This page has been archived and commenting is disabled.

Group Claims Elevated Radioactivity Levels At Tokyo 2020 Olympic Venues

Tyler Durden's picture





 

Measurements taken at 39 sporting venues earmarked to stage the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games have elevated levels of radioactivity according to a citizen's group. The South China Morning Post reports that the group "found caesium-137 at almost every place [they] carried out tests, and there was no caesium here before the accident at Fukushima." Tests were made at the Olympic Village, Media Center, and the highest radiation reading, 0.484 microsieverts per hour, was detected in undergrowth close to Yumenoshima Stadium - significantly higher than the level of 0.23 microsieverts per hour set by the government as the standard for decontamination work going on in the exclusion zone around the nuclear plant. In response to a request, a spokesman for Tokyo 2020 insisted: "Radiation levels in the air and water of Tokyo are safe." So all good then...

 

Via The South China Morning Post,

A citizens' group in Tokyo has found elevated levels of radioactivity at sporting facilities that will be used in the 2020 Olympic Games and is warning that competitors and the hundreds of thousands of people expected to flock to the city for the event will be putting themselves in danger.

 

The Citizens' Group for Measuring Radioactive Environment at Facilities for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics claims wind-borne radiation from the four crippled reactors at the Fukushima nuclear plant has contaminated a number of future venues.

 

...

 

The tests were also carried out at the planned site of the Olympic Village and the media centre, with the highest radiation reading - 0.484 microsieverts per hour - detected in undergrowth close to Yumenoshima Stadium, where the equestrian events will be held.

 

Soil samples collected at the site had 3,040 becquerels of caesium per kilogram.

 

...

 

While the readings do not pose an immediate threat to human health, members of the group say they are still significantly higher than the level of 0.23 microsieverts per hour set by the government as the standard for decontamination work going on in the exclusion zone around the nuclear plant.

 

"We found caesium-137 at almost every place we carried out tests, and there was no caesium here before the accident at Fukushima," Mitsuo Tanaka, a member of the group, told the South China Morning Post.

 

...

 

In response to a request from the Post, a spokesman for Toyko 2020 insisted: "Radiation levels in the air and water of Tokyo are safe.

 


- advertisements -

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Sat, 10/12/2013 - 21:53 | Link to Comment screw face
screw face's picture

 

(((((((((Zerohedge@Fukushima))))))))))

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:07 | Link to Comment Skateboarder
Skateboarder's picture

TEPCO Tank Jump!!! (a la wb7)

\m/

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:17 | Link to Comment JohnnyBriefcase
JohnnyBriefcase's picture

I look forward to seeing this story on the nightly news. Maybe Anderson Cooper will do a special on it.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 01:13 | Link to Comment MeMadMax
MeMadMax's picture

Seriously ZH...

 

Thats in japan, who gives a shit...

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 03:09 | Link to Comment Manthong
Manthong's picture

I want tickets for the 25 meter SFP freestyle event.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 03:34 | Link to Comment Short Memories
Short Memories's picture

ZH needs to do some study it seems:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Background_radiation

Even if the numbers in Tokyo are 5 times what they were before Fukushima, they are still lower than many cities in the world.
ZH normally prides itself on knowing about numbers (remember the finance theme of this site?) well, go an learn if 0.4 microsieverts is worrying compared to the normal 0.2!

The world has bigger problems. Japan has bigger problems, Fukushima however has a problem. It might become tokyos problem but these numbers tell me that it isn't tokyos problem at the moment.

But then, I'm believing the numbers, not the commentry

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 04:36 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

With all respect - I get the impression that it's you who ought to do some study:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioactive_contamination

For a start learn that a "Sievert" is a quite great unit of measure. Which means that 0.4 mSv compared to the (way to high) "normal" 0.2 mSv is worrying. If you indeed believe numbers, you should be worried. Very worried!

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 04:50 | Link to Comment old naughty
old naughty's picture

I wonder if parents of olympic athletes would send their kids to Tokyo...

unless the kids are over 18 by 2020 so will be free to choose !?

 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 04:57 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

Personally, I'd threaten my children with sudden disinheritance, should they ever dare to set foot on that contaminated soil. Just my advice - worth what you paid for it ;-)

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 07:28 | Link to Comment GetZeeGold
GetZeeGold's picture

 

 

No worries, they should have everything hammered out by 2019.....they hope.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 07:31 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

Yeah, hope and change ... that rings a bell ...  ;-)

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:07 | Link to Comment Short Memories
Short Memories's picture

Bearwagon,

Agree that a sievert is a huge dose of exposure

Agree that a millisievert in a small time period is a large dose

We are talking about .2 of a *micro* sievert. You get a bigger dose from passing though airport security scanners once!

Trust me on this, I live in Japan, I own a gieger counter, I measure for myself and I have studied this a lot.

The lies from the fear mongering media is almost as bad as the lies from the government.

People need to be more informed, they need to learn what numbers are worrying in what time periods and what are not. I guess you would have disinherited me though :P

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:45 | Link to Comment Canoe Driver
Canoe Driver's picture

Sieverts measure cumulative dose. The rates cited in the article would result in the equivalent of a chest-x-ray after about 5 weeks of continuous exposure.  The caesium is accumulating, and will continue to accumulate, and is quite toxic. There will be many bone and blood cancers caused. By 2020, it's reasonable to assume the dose rate will be perhaps the equivalent of 2 chest x-rays per day. And this all discounts the inhalation of radioactive dust and partculate, which is indeed far more dangerous. There will be no Olympics in Tokyo, absent the largest disinformation campaign in human history.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:53 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

No, I would not have disinherited you. If you live in Japan, my best wishes are with you. Nonetheless, a Sievert being such a huge dose is exactly the reason why 0.2 µSv is still a large dose. And as far as I know it roughly equals the dose you get from airport scanners. The point is not if that's a huge dose or not. You are correct in stating that time is of importance. While a dose of 0.2 µSv may indeed be bearable, a dose-rate of 0.2 µSv/h would sum up to a hazardous dose rather quickly. And see my comment below regarding the risks of measuring with geiger counters. I have studied this, too - at university. Of course fear mongering lies are bad - but what about frightening truth? I did learn what time periods and numbers are worrying, and these numbers do worry me. Does that make me a fear-mongerer? 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 09:59 | Link to Comment Keyser
Keyser's picture

It's immaterial that we are discussing milli vs micro Sieverts as you have to trust the authorities in their reporting, which we know is inacurrate. Anecdotal evidence from Japan is more serious with thousands of people reporting uncontrolled nose bleeds, most likely from radiation exposure. 

http://nuclear-news.net/2013/10/02/thousands-in-japan-suffering-massive-and-recurring-nosebleeds-in-recent-days/

In other words, how can you trust the readings when you can't trust the reporting authority? 

 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 11:21 | Link to Comment Sparkey
Sparkey's picture

Poor Japan, these folks have had some discouraging days in the last couple of years, now when they have been awarded the Olympics, which should be a time of happiness and looking forward to a better future, what do we actually have? Nay sayers and trouble makers turning over every rock and bush trying to keep the agony alive as long as they can, it is all very sad, I guess they will just never be forgiven for Pearl Harbor, that is what this is all about, isn't it? right? ?

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 11:53 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

The only harbour we would be interested in, is IMHO the harbour from which the next fellow ZHer sets sail, because his PMs have arrived. And for the radiolympics ... do you by chance remember the Lodnon Oimplycs 2102? That did really something for the local community, didn't it? If the community would be the (three times cursed) "City Of London", that is, of course. Otherwise, you'd better get lost before some well-paying customers get annoyed by your sight, right? That's indeed a future worth looking forward to ...

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 06:03 | Link to Comment outofideas
outofideas's picture

mili and micro are completely different units of measure. Like almost 1000 times different :)

Not go back to those tables and the article and do some math.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 09:12 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

Oh, I see what I did there. Sorry. But nonetheless it is not a harmless dose. And while we are at it: REM (Roentgen Equivalent Men) and Sievert are completely different units of measure. Like hundred times different :) (That means 0.4 µSv = 40 µREM -> anything but harmless).

But thanks for the correction of my slip of the pen, you are correct, regarding the units of measure.

edit: Anyways - one should think about dose rate, not just dose. That's where it's getting interesting ...

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 13:04 | Link to Comment Anusocracy
Anusocracy's picture

0.484 microsieverts per hour is about 4 millisieverts per year.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2477708/

Abstract

The conventional approach for radiation protection is based on the ICRP's linear, no threshold (LNT) model of radiation carcinogenesis, which implies that ionizing radiation is always harmful, no matter how small the dose. But a different approach can be derived from the observed health effects of the serendipitous contamination of 1700 apartments in Taiwan with cobalt-60 (T1/2 = 5.3 y). This experience indicates that chronic exposure of the whole body to low-dose-rate radiation, even accumulated to a high annual dose, may be beneficial to human health. Approximately 10,000 people occupied these buildings and received an average radiation dose of 0.4 Sv, unknowingly, during a 9–20 year period. They did not suffer a higher incidence of cancer mortality, as the LNT theory would predict. On the contrary, the incidence of cancer deaths in this population was greatly reduced—to about 3 per cent of the incidence of spontaneous cancer death in the general Taiwan public. In addition, the incidence of congenital malformations was also reduced—to about 7 per cent of the incidence in the general public. These observations appear to be compatible with the radiation hormesis model. Information about this Taiwan experience should be communicated to the public worldwide to help allay its fear of radiation and create a positive impression about important radiation applications. Expenditures of many billions of dollars in nuclear reactor operation could be saved and expansion of nuclear electricity generation could be facilitated. In addition, this knowledge would encourage further investigation and implementation of very important applications of total-body, low-dose irradiation to treat and cure many illnesses, including cancer. The findings of this study are such a departure from expectations, based on ICRP criteria, that we believe that they ought to be carefully reviewed by other, independent organizations and that population data not available to the authors be provided, so that a fully qualified epidemiologically-valid analysis can be made. Many of the confounding factors that limit other studies used to date, such as the A-bomb survivors, the Mayak workers and the Chernobyl evacuees, are not present in this population exposure. It should be one of the most important events on which to base radiation protection standards.
I.?INTRODUCTION

An extraordinary incident occurred 22 years ago in Taiwan. Recycled steel, accidentally contaminated with discarded cobalt-60 sources (T1/2 = 5.3 y), was formed into construction steel for more than 180 buildings containing about 1700 apartments, and also public and private schools and small businesses, in Taipei City and nearby counties. About ten thousand people occupied these buildings for 9 to 22 years. While this construction occurred during 1982–84, most of the buildings were completed in 1983.[1, 2] In this preliminary assessment, we consider 1983 to be the first year of the incident. The radioactive state of the buildings was gradually discovered, beginning on July 31, 1992.[2] Less than 100 contaminated apartments were identified in 1992. The number increased to more than 200 in 1993; then to a total of 896 in 1995, 1206 in 1996, and 1277 in 1997. An intensive research program was conducted in 1998, and more than 1600 apartments were finally documented by the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) of Taiwan. After approximately four cobalt-60 half-lives, most of the apartments now have relatively low levels of radiation, less than 5 mSv (500 mrem) per year, and are still in use today. Half of the residents in apartments with high radiation levels have been evacuated, starting in 1996. They all lived in these buildings for at least nine years, with some staying as long as 22 years.
II.?MEASUREMENT OF APARTMENT DOSE RATES

Dose-rates were measured with very accurate GM survey meters calibrated in dose-equivalent units, ?Sv/hr. Doses were carefully determined using an AEC procedure specifically designed for this project. For evaluating the average dose to the residents, their average occupancy time was conservatively taken as 12 hours in living rooms, 8 hours in bedrooms, and 4 hours at other locations (i.e., half of the residents assumed to be outside 8 hours/day).[1] The dose evaluations were used to classify the apartment dwellers into three cohorts, based on contamination level (average dose rate), for government remedial measures and care:[3]
• High contamination cohort (~11%): > 15 mSv/y
• Moderate contamination (~9%): 5–15
• Low contamination cohort (~80%): 1–5

ESTIMATE OF DOSES IN APARTMENTS

An estimation of the integrated doses to the residents was necessary to assess the health effects of the radiation exposures. Several dose reconstruction studies have been carried out and reported in national and international journals. Some used thermo luminescent detectors (TLDs) at different positions of the body;[4] some used suspended TLDs in air;[5] some relied on TLD necklaces,[6] and some used Rondo phantoms.[7] Our evaluation used a simplified method to approximate the doses received by the residents and to modify the AEC doses, estimated by the task team from the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), with reasonable factors.

In December 1996, the AEC estimated that 20% of the residents received an annual (1996) dose in the range from 5 to 160 mSv, therefore, 80% of the residents received a dose of less than 5 mSv.[1] A crude estimate of the average 1996 dose for each cohort is: • High cohort (~11%): (160 + 15)/2 = 87.5 mSv
• Medium cohort (~9%): (15 + 5)/2 10
• Low cohort (~80%): (5 + 1)/2 3

Therefore, in 1996, the mean annual dose received by all the residents was about 13 mSv (i.e., 87.5 × 0.11 + 10 × 0.09 + 3 × 0.80), and the maximum dose was 160 mSv.

For the year 1983, we calculate the mean dose to be about 74 mSv and the maximum to be about 910 mSv. Adjusting the mean dose for a residency factor of 0.7 and a correction of 0.95 to TLD doses gives 49 mSv. The individual mean dose from 1983 until 2003 was 0.40 Sv for all cohorts. For the high cohort, the mean dose was 4 Sv, with a maximum of 6 Sv, assuming half of the residents moved out in 1996. The doses are summarized in Table 1.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 13:50 | Link to Comment NaN
NaN's picture

Interesting study, but no dust is involved.

Mon, 10/14/2013 - 01:00 | Link to Comment Trampy
Trampy's picture

0.484 microsieverts per hour is about 4 millisieverts per year.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2477708/

Give me a jingle, Anusocracy.  Very few people here are capable of understanding why radiation hormesis was found operative in many places, while the only study I know of that detected harm from dose near background levels was in the rad workers at Sizewell.

Cesium has a nasty habit of gettiing mixed in with steel, like happened at Juarez in 1984.

My email is embedded in the PGP key posted under Bio here. 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 07:12 | Link to Comment Reptil
Reptil's picture

The issue is that these measurements show that there's radioactive DUST in Tokyo (which was in the plume of the reactor 3 fallout).
What you're regurgitating is an industry myth, namely that radiocativity from the soil (where the uranium or radium or whatever), which is incapsuled in rock, is equal in effect as (small particles of radioactive substances).

The dust is dangerous because it gets into everything, including people's lungs, to reek havoc 5 or 10 years later.
It's the difference between EXTERNAL (not as dangerous) and INTERNAL (very dangerous) exposure. As a part of this fallout was in alpha emitters which cannot be detected with a geiger counter evern, the situation is even more grave that the measurements show.
So how did anyone know there's these fine dust particles that are alpha emitters? They looked at car filters.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRLfPM73FA0

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 07:31 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

I'd like to add that a great amount of said dust is composed of elements with a relatively short half-life. As should be obvious, the shorter the half-life the stronger the radiation. And because of their short half-life, these elements do not occur in nature: They all decayed completely, billions of years ago. As a consequence, we now have to deal with materials that have never been a part of our natural environment!

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:56 | Link to Comment Canoe Driver
Canoe Driver's picture

The crisis at Fukushima is also ongoing, and is widely expected to worsen. Cleanup is estimated to take decades, at least. Thus, ground contamination in Tokyo will increase. And if there is an open-air fission event during fuel pool dismantling, it'll be much, much worse.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 13:27 | Link to Comment worbsid
worbsid's picture

I believe the wiki document is millisieverts per year while the tests in Tokoyo are millisiervents per hour. 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 03:05 | Link to Comment jeff montanye
jeff montanye's picture

you may have something here, mr. briefcase.  if there is a sports tie-in, the potentially greatest man-made disaster in human history might get some news coverage.  a little like the porno aspect of the non-enforcement of the securities laws story, though it moved the story only from utterly ignored to mentioned in passing with snicker.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 21:56 | Link to Comment ebworthen
ebworthen's picture

OMG - marketing opportunity!

"Radiation absorbing bracelets" with the TEPCO symbols alternated with Maneki-neko's (good luck cat) and infused with powdered lead and catnip!

In rainbow colors and blessed by a priest of your chosen religion.

Kosher too!

Cha-ching!

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:17 | Link to Comment philipat
philipat's picture

Don't forget the pink "Hello Kitty" radiation suits..

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:18 | Link to Comment ebworthen
ebworthen's picture

LOL...exactly, and "Do not worry" written across it.

Just wait, someone will sell it or something(s) like it.

The people will come, there will be reassurances that "everything is safe", the money must flow!

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:30 | Link to Comment delacroix
delacroix's picture

shikata ga nai

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 07:30 | Link to Comment GetZeeGold
GetZeeGold's picture

 

 

Don't forget the pink "Hello Kitty" radiation suits..

 

No worries if you do.....you can get damn near anything from a Japanese vending machine.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:36 | Link to Comment Running On Bing...
Running On Bingo Fuel's picture

That you Kyle?

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 12:33 | Link to Comment Reptil
Reptil's picture

Someone beat you to it: "Coppelion" anime just released.
Three genetically modified girls wearing school uniforms enter a forbidden zone (the old capital) where even guys in hazmat suits croak.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fm_IflUKc7U

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 21:56 | Link to Comment stateside
stateside's picture

After Tokyo, in the 2024 games, there will be a new competitive event - the three-legged race.

 

stateside

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:18 | Link to Comment philipat
philipat's picture

So that's still one leg per eye for the spectators??

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:48 | Link to Comment Bunga Bunga
Bunga Bunga's picture

Paralympics are going to get a lot bigger too.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 21:55 | Link to Comment fonzannoon
fonzannoon's picture

They should have the bilderbergh meeting (however the fk you spell it) next year just to illustrate how safe it is.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:04 | Link to Comment BlackChicken
BlackChicken's picture

Once the radiation games are over, the Olympic site should be turned into a prison for the bankers, politicians, and media heads.

Then use THAT venue to generate revenue by selling pay-per-view (in HD) of the slow motion death of these monsters.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:50 | Link to Comment Bunga Bunga
Bunga Bunga's picture

No prison needed, they just assign them to the Fukushima cleanup crews.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 21:57 | Link to Comment remain calm
remain calm's picture

I know the times in  track don't count if the wind speed is greater than 2 mph. Does anyone know if their are limits to nuclear propulsion energy levels?

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 21:59 | Link to Comment nmewn
nmewn's picture

Just trust it...the show must go on.

"Look! They're recycling!" - Diane Sawyer, noted MSM pundit & humanitarian.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:19 | Link to Comment philipat
philipat's picture

I'm still waiting for some clueless MSM shithead to opine that "By 2020 the radiation levels will have significantly declined".....

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:20 | Link to Comment IridiumRebel
IridiumRebel's picture

Cesium has a half life of 4 months, right?

 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 03:53 | Link to Comment philipat
philipat's picture

Close. It's about 30 years....

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:37 | Link to Comment Running On Bing...
Running On Bingo Fuel's picture

I think that was rhetorical with a touch of sarcasm and a pinch of irony.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 09:16 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

I think that was outright cynical. (And rightly so.)

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 06:25 | Link to Comment Dodgy Geezer
Dodgy Geezer's picture

...I'm still waiting for some clueless MSM shithead to opine that "By 2020 the radiation levels will have significantly declined".....

Well, the decline is asymptotic, so by 2020 the levels will have dropped to around 0.8 of current levels. Which, of course, are quite safe already. It's up to you if you consider that significant or not.

 

Many countries around the world have that level of radiation naturally. The highest have around 10 times that level as normal. It was rather funny to see diplomats being advised to leave Tokyo when the radiation scare was on, and to realise that they were being advised to return to their homes where there were higher levels of natural radiation than the threat they were fleeing.

Still, there is some good from this panic. Many parts of the world are quite safe from having nuclear reactors built there, because the background radiation levels are already higher than the mandatory maximum figures for radiation workers.

Panic over radiation results in stupid situations like this...

 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 06:50 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

Spare us the irregular comparison of naturally occuring radiation with heavy transuranic elements and fission prdoucts! The level of radiation is not everything that counts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioactive_contamination 
Irradiation is NOT the same than contamination, damn, is that so hard to understand? Also, it makes a huge difference if the particles get excreted quickly, or if they remain in the body - which has absolutely nothing to do with shieldable background radiation. For example Strontium gets incorporated into bones, where it radiates tissue all day, and all of the night. So the relatively low dose rate of a small amount of Strontium adds up to a massive dose over time.
Underestimating the hazards of ionizinig radiation results in cancer and premature death.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 10:28 | Link to Comment Dodgy Geezer
Dodgy Geezer's picture

Bearwagon, Caesium is not transuranic. You do not know what you are talking about, and are simply spreading misinformation in an attempt to start a scare.

You seem to be implying that naturally-occuring radiation is somehow different from radiation derived from a nuclear power station. This is on a par with claiming that electricity from a wind turbine is different to that coming from a coal-fired power station!

None of your sentences say anything unsurprising - 'Underestimating the hazards of radiation results in death' is a good example. You have actually provided NO data at all about any increased threat, merely mouthing cliches and platitudes, but you are insinuating that Tokyo has become a dangerously irradiated place place.

 

This is untrue, and you are trying to spread malicious propaganda.    

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 10:49 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

I did nowhere say that Caesium 137 is transuranic. It is a fission product (the only stable isotope would be Cs 133). You seem eager to divert from the difference between radiation and contamination. Radiation from a nuclear plant indeed is different from naturally occuring radiation, because it mostly derives from elements with a half-life that is to short for them to occur in nature. Cs 137 has a half-life of about 30 years, which is the reason why it does not occur in nature. Your statement is on par with claiming that electricity from a 1.5 Volt battery is no different from 15 kV high-voltage. I don't care to provide anyone with data who doesn't pay me, and I have not stated that Tokyo has become a dangerously irradiated place - I state that it is a contaminated place, and time will tell how dagerous that will be. So, you imply that I said something I never did say, and subsequently accuse me of lying - yeah, that makes lot's of sense. Question is, who's the one spreading malicious propaganda here? Reading comprehension would be a clear advantage.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 13:34 | Link to Comment 11b40
11b40's picture

Thank you.  I have no background in science beyond courses taken decades ago, bu I can still understand the difference between being scanned at an airport and ingesting radioactive material.

I have a son who was once a world class athelte, a world champion.  His sport was never approved for the Olympics, but came close.  He had 5 stints at the Olypic Training Camp in CO. and is still heavily involved in fitness.  He would not go to Japan were he invited as an Olympian.  Before this is over, there are going to be plenty of other athletes and their families who come to that conclusion.

What if they have an Olympics and nobody comes?

Mon, 10/14/2013 - 07:56 | Link to Comment Dodgy Geezer
Dodgy Geezer's picture

You seem eager to divert from the difference between radiation and contamination.

1 - learn to use English properly

2 - From the original article:

Some experts point out that the context in which the tests were carried out is crucial.

"It is difficult to have this debate unless we know for sure whether this radiation is from Fukushima or whether it is naturally occurring background radiation," said Pieter Franken, founder of the Japan office of the environmental monitoring organisation Safecast." 

So at the moment the environmental monitors onsite do not know the difference. But you think you do.

Your posts have all been cod science with scary mentions of all sorts of dangers - why talk about Strontium, for god's sake? You are a green scaremonger, and I am glad to see that the main news media are finally ceasing to print these hyped-up Halloween scams.

One question. Assume that those currently reported radiation levels in Tokyo are true, and there is a slight increase in background. We do not know what that is, because the only figure the activists have publicised is their highest spot reading. Let's assume background is up, say, 30%. Would you then be 'safer from radiation' living in Toyko, or Denver, Colarado?

 

 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 17:59 | Link to Comment Reptil
Reptil's picture

responding to 4049581

Panic? I don't see a panic.
Maybe you got the word "concern" mixed up with the word "panic".

I see a small percentage of the population grabbing all relevant information about the worst industrial fuckup of our civilisation. I see the media aping the nuclear industry, I see politicians behave like sockpuppets of the militairy industrial complex, I see regulators blacking out notes of meetings they don't want us to see, I see radiological measuring/warning stations close (for the public) right when there's a huge planetary release of Iodine 131 and these are most needed, I see presidents lying through their teeth, while sending their family off to vacation as far away as possible. I see the Secretary of State urge the japanese government to protect business interests (and not panic). That's what I see.
Many japanese are now aware that it's all about "saving face", but disciplined as they are, remain in their society role, they don't panic, very good, no panic. Nosebleed, thryriöd disfunctions, fine, but THANK GOD, or Buddha, no panic.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEw93ov25ys

And you can rest assured, you won't see a panic ever. In 3-8 years when the cancer epidemic will hit (just like atmospheric bomb testing caused in the seventies), most won't be able to panic, that's how sick they'll be. Just like those in Belarus they'll only be able to accept the situation as it unfolds. Nevermind that the gene pool will be all fucked up.
Bloody hell, the nuke industry KNEW that the BWR-1 design was flawed, but they built it anyway. Put a spent fuel pool right on top of a pressurised reactor vessel, and then stack 30+ years of hot, radioactive waste in it. Hand the keys to the whole incredibly complicated gizmo to some guys that smile and say "yes" to everything, and walk away? And have them put it on top of an aquifer, on a slab of mud, next to a tsunami and typhoon ridden oceanic coast, on the "earthquake" capital of the planet. Upwind from where you live.

Right now, right there in the US of A there's the same crap design plants. Right next to the fresh water supply of millions, and the most densely populated areas in the USA. (Indian Point) Without a valid, workable evacuation plan. Oh but that's not needed since some industry paid jerkoff at MIT said (against all relevant studies) that a little radiation is good for you.
And you might panic if you knew how fucking fucked everything about these plants is.
Which would be bad. Can't have people panic, very bad.
Many 'mericans don't even have a clue what a nuclear plant is, does, or could do, let alone write about it. So they won't.
phew
dangerous crisis averted!

Tell it to the 'injuns'. They're to suffer the consequences of not panicing. Maybe you could teach them a thing or two about how smart that was.
http://truth-out.org/news/item/16752-americas-secret-fukushima-poisoning...

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 20:15 | Link to Comment The Burning Planet
The Burning Planet's picture

That rant should be framed.

One typo nitpick. I think you meant PWR-1.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:02 | Link to Comment wisehiney
wisehiney's picture

Incredible Hulk wins Twerking Gold!

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:06 | Link to Comment Totentänzerlied
Totentänzerlied's picture

Blobbing-up radioactive contamination cover-up - it is japanese citizen citizenism eternal nature...

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:06 | Link to Comment williambanzai7
williambanzai7's picture

TANK JUMP

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:38 | Link to Comment LeisureSmith
LeisureSmith's picture

A lot of exitement about who will win the Daiichi no.4 Spent fuel pool Synchronized swimming and lost fuel pellet recovery event.

Ukraine and Belarus are favorites, but Japan is hot and getting hotter.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 09:08 | Link to Comment JamesBond
JamesBond's picture

well sine the tanks are leaking, this would have to be part of a triathlon event...

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 21:41 | Link to Comment The Burning Planet
The Burning Planet's picture

TEPCO and Japan have definitely "jumped the tank."

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:04 | Link to Comment Yen Cross
Yen Cross's picture

I don't even want to think about the dollar/yen exchange rate in ( twenty twenty)...

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:31 | Link to Comment seek
seek's picture

The value of 0/0 is undefined.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:08 | Link to Comment JustObserving
JustObserving's picture

Finally we can have a Spiderman event at the Olympics.  Releasing a few spiders now will be a good start.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:20 | Link to Comment TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

.

Finally we can have a Spiderman event at the Olympics.  Releasing a few spiders now will be a good start.

Don't forget the beach towels.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:13 | Link to Comment Kiwi Pete
Kiwi Pete's picture

Will the three-legged race finally become an Olympic event?

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:17 | Link to Comment joego1
joego1's picture

The Olympic games are a no show. Give it up Japan.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:21 | Link to Comment stateside
stateside's picture

Notice the story was in a Chinese paper. The Japanese newspapers have been instructed to mothball any negative news.

stateside

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:14 | Link to Comment Non Passaran
Non Passaran's picture

Of course. And the Chinese haven't been instructed to do the opposite.
Genius.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:25 | Link to Comment holdbuysell
holdbuysell's picture

In all fairness, the sourced article reads: "

Elevated radiation claimed at Tokyo 2020 Olympic venues

Citizens' group carries out tests at sites for key Tokyo Games facilities, but expert cautious about findings and organisers see no problem"

However, it's entertaining that the different groups (citizens, experts, organizers) are all standing by their interests.

IMO, the wisdom of the (informed and vested-interest) crowds (citizens in this case) will win every time. And in this specific case, they are the ONLY ones who have been remotely credible.

Small group of (groupthink) experts? Data doesn't support it. See http://www.amazon.com/dp/0385721706/?tag=mh0b-20&hvadid=1675373084&ref=p...

Organisers? Sheezus, of course they see no problem.

 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 13:48 | Link to Comment 11b40
11b40's picture

Bingo!  The 'crowds' will be staying away from Japan in droves.  In my opinion, so will the athletes.  These kids tend to be high acheivers in all aspects of their lives, and their families tend to be well informed.  Pulling the wool over the eyes of highly health-consious people will not be easy, and this situation is only getting worse.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:27 | Link to Comment ziggy59
ziggy59's picture

Think how much energy they will save come 2020 when 1/3 of Japan glows in dark...

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:27 | Link to Comment ziggy59
ziggy59's picture

"If you irradiate it, people will come"

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:30 | Link to Comment GOLD AND SILVER...
GOLD AND SILVER NATZI's picture

Odds on the 2020 Olympics even happening?  Not even taking into account the ongoing catastrohpe and Fukyoushima, I imagine there will be a world war in the next six years due to the impeding global economic collapse.  It's going to be difficult having an Olypmics when every male from the age of 18-36 is going to be fighting in the trenches.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:35 | Link to Comment TrulyStupid
TrulyStupid's picture

There already is a world war going on...in its 12th year. There are no trenches... only computer games.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:31 | Link to Comment apberusdisvet
apberusdisvet's picture

Time to re-read "On the Beach" by Neville Shute, which describes a bunch of Aussies waiting for the radiation from a nuclear armageddon to reach them.  This novel was written in the 1950s, and is quite prescient.

Those of us in North America will experience this first hand over the next 20 years.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:37 | Link to Comment seek
seek's picture

It was made into a very anti-nuke movie as well. Depressing as hell.

However I don't think it'll be quite so bad in the US. I am sure it will cause issues but there's no real mechanism for inland to get contaiminated too severely.

Certainly enough to be detected though, I've already done that.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:39 | Link to Comment TrulyStupid
TrulyStupid's picture

Whew, what a relief,,, let's move the Olympics to Kansas..

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:15 | Link to Comment IridiumRebel
IridiumRebel's picture

I grew up in Kansas and I used to say that if drinking were an Olympic sport, Kansans would medal. 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 04:27 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

Talking of a very anti-nuke movie ... I'd provide a link. To "On The Beach":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mxvx9gQ8k0

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:37 | Link to Comment delacroix
delacroix's picture

trustee from the toolroom published after neville shutes death.   complete with precious metals, and boating accidents.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:41 | Link to Comment Yen Cross
Yen Cross's picture

I'm all over the "central bankster" waterboarding event. Hell I'll camp out for seats to that event!

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:13 | Link to Comment IridiumRebel
IridiumRebel's picture

If only Corzine could take the gold....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

there's the pitch....

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:53 | Link to Comment Seer
Seer's picture

"Radiation levels in the air and water of Tokyo are safe" for Godzilla...

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:43 | Link to Comment Running On Bing...
Running On Bingo Fuel's picture

Next up, bingdu epidemic jumps border, and Sea of Japan, and lands in Tokyo.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 22:57 | Link to Comment Bagbalm
Bagbalm's picture

Best not go root around in the underbrush where they found it then...

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:11 | Link to Comment Non Passaran
Non Passaran's picture

1) if anything, we should see faster-running athletes. The faster you run the sooner you go home
2) the article is crappy - for a sec I thought GW wrote it. Of course there is SOME radiation, for fuck's sake the country recently had a nuclear accident. What matters is where do those readings stand in relation to harmful levels?
3) I doubt this whole story. Thousands of geeks in Japan own and operate radiation meters and many are available online, in real time. Yet suddenly there comes a Hong Kong journalist who discovers all this shit. Give that man a Nobel prize!

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 01:19 | Link to Comment Peter Pan
Peter Pan's picture

Your first point is funny but I think you may have missed the Japanese prime minister's public call for international experts to help in solving the Fukushima disaster. In other words they have not and cannot bring it under control.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 13:55 | Link to Comment 11b40
11b40's picture

Read it again.  It was a local citizens group who made their findings public.  It was simply reported in the China Post.

Are you simply saying 'no problem'?

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:19 | Link to Comment Element
Element's picture

 

 

OT:

Now we finally begin to see, really, why it was that all the MSM expert and political voices were calling for a intervention and attack (BUT NOT WAR! ... GAWDAMIT!!!) in Syria after August 21st 2013.

The US MSM and US MIC, knowingly and systematically, attempted to stampede us into a larger regional conflict, but unfortunately for them, it largely failed to escalate in the ways they'd hoped it would, and the way it had been scripted:

--

At Least 22 Defense Industry Stakeholders Used as ‘Pundits’ by US Media to Sell Syria War
 
October 12, 2013 - By 21wire

 
Before the White House’s Syrian War flop, networks like CNN, MSNBC, Fox News and Bloomberg TV wheeled out at least 22 different men who they claimed were “pundits” and “commentators”, but in actuality were merely bomb and missile salesmen – who held director, board and shareholding positions with military giants like Raytheon, DC Capital Partners and BAE Systems.
 
Yes, you heard that right.
 
Watchdog organisation, the Public Accountability Initiative, a non-profit research group, details this and many more disclosures in its recent and damning report on US media coverage to hype a war in Syria [linked below]. ..."

 

http://21stcenturywire.com/2013/10/12/at-least-22-defense-industry-stake...

 
Now have a close look at this graphical network of who were the US 'experts', pushing for a WWIII kick-off in Syria:
http://public-accountability.org/wp-content/uploads/Think-Tank-map.png

And look at this mini expose video of the massive White House propaganda machine effort re an attack and overthrow in Syria:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZv-MM9iWtA&feature=youtu.be

--

And this more detailed source report on what and how the US and European media and US military Industrial Estate worked in-depth specifically to try and push us into a major war against Syria, Iran, Hezbollah, Russia and of course China;

Conflicts of interest in the Syria debate - An analysis of the defense industry ties of experts and think tanks who commented on military intervention - October 11, 2013
http://public-accountability.org/2013/10/conflicts-of-interest-in-the-sy...

So much for Kerry, and for the Obama Nobel peace prize! He's been a warmongering peice of shit for beginning to end.

The 'Iran-Project' presented a few salient points regarding that 2013 peace-prize choice:

"... This year’s recipient, the inspection team belonging to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, have only begun their work last week to dismantle stockpiles in Syria. This is part of the arrangement that Russia proposed last month to avert an illegal war of aggression being planned by the Nobel Peace Laureate Barack Obama. The Syrian government of President Bashar al-Assad has fully signed up the disarmament process.
 
However, it is precocious, to say the least, to award the OPCW with the Nobel prize, just like it was for the Oslo-based committee to give the award to Obama in 2009, only within months of his first election and before he went on to prove himself one of America’s most warmongering presidents since World War II.
 
How do we know that the OPCW will be effective in disarming the chemical weapons of the Western-backed mercenary groups fighting to overthrow the Assad government? How do we know that the OPCW will not mischievously misuse its remit and Nobel Laureate status to advance the Western propaganda narrative against the Syrian government?
 
      "The awarding of a peace prize based on no track record conjures suspicion that the institution and its benign connotations are being used to inculcate a reprehensible political agenda." ..."
 
http://theiranproject.com/blog/2013/10/11/nobel-prize-part-of-wests-prop...

 
N E V A H !

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:20 | Link to Comment Seer
Seer's picture

And then there's this damning picture of them all together:

http://www.veteranstoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/hot-tub-syria2.jpg

Looks like they need to be tossed a line, the end of a plugged in power cord...

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:31 | Link to Comment Tinky
Tinky's picture

Excellent update.

Utterly predictable, but still. Using corruption as a barometer of the state of our society, it's hard to argue against getting the hell outta Dodge, if you can.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:18 | Link to Comment LeisureSmith
LeisureSmith's picture

No fooli'n?...."found caesium-137 at almost every place [they] carried out tests, and there was no caesium here before the accident at Fukushima." 

Mind blowing stuff, almost as if there had been several core meltdowns or something.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:20 | Link to Comment q99x2
q99x2's picture

Don't worry. Be happy. In 2020 the radiation levels in Tokyo may be low compared to the rest of the world.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:27 | Link to Comment tony wilson
tony wilson's picture

kissinger,prince phillip,soros ,bush and rothschild know that injecting childrens blood into worn out veins will only delay death a little.

so why not fuck over everyone else.

you must die you are plague it is official

what what.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:40 | Link to Comment grunk
grunk's picture

Eliigible for another Olympics in about 30,000 years.

Sat, 10/12/2013 - 23:48 | Link to Comment Bunga Bunga
Bunga Bunga's picture

Guys, I smell new world records.

 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 00:25 | Link to Comment ILikeBoats
ILikeBoats's picture

Official Japanese response:  "Do not worry."

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 01:11 | Link to Comment Peter Pan
Peter Pan's picture

Let's see Abe print his way out of this one.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 01:10 | Link to Comment Peter Pan
Peter Pan's picture

The raditation readings will only be of concern in 2020 when they have tripled, quadrupled or perhaps are off the charts.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 01:31 | Link to Comment CPL
CPL's picture

Like the last eight times, they'll just change acceptable standards on the chart and call it normal.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:53 | Link to Comment Running On Bing...
Running On Bingo Fuel's picture

Or like the first time, do not buy equipment that measures beyond `acceptable levels`. And only purchase equipment from HeadInSand.com eqwip-ment marketpwace.

Over.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 03:26 | Link to Comment andycrazn
andycrazn's picture

awesome. this means they gonna show off the new glow in the dark medals.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 03:48 | Link to Comment _ConanTheLibert...
_ConanTheLibertarian_'s picture

I wonder whether or not the athletes are going to perform better on a nice dose of radiation...

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 04:34 | Link to Comment Brixton Guns
Brixton Guns's picture

[adjusts tinfoil hat] folks... try to wrap your puny brains around this one...

imagine just for a second, that US and most developed nations each have a "death star" weapon, a series of ground-based antenna arrays [ie. HAARP etc] capable of projecting so many gigawatts of targeted scalar energy tuned to just the right resonant frequency, then bounced across the earth via the ionosphere to its target destination a few miles below the surface off the coast of Japan, so that at the press of a keystroke the operator could willfully create a giant 9+ earthquake and resultant tsunami.  imagine the same transmission system could also remotely interfere with fly-by-wire braking and acceleration systems of toyota priuses and mercedes benzes carrying british princesses and whistleblowing journalists.  imagine also that just prior to the pressing of this keystroke, by as many as a few hours even, that a "flame" or "stuxnet"-like computer virus which had infected the fukushima power plant computer systems caused multiple reactor cooling systems to fail.  yes, before the quake.   imagine that the orders to press that keystroke are given from centcom in sarasota florida to a geek with a joystick underground usgs hq in boulder colorado, in part of likely the most massive underground city on the planet, centered around falcon co some two miles below the surface.  no you cant take a tour, and anyone you ask will deny its existence.  imagine that arecibo is emitting scalar pulses which are energizing and directing massive cyclones hitting the southwest of US, and that similar ones elsewhere are directing even bigger ones on the asian continent.  imagine those in the know refer to all this as weather warfare, weaponized weather.  imagine that one of the many facets of the chemtrail agenda is indeed "geoengineering" by means of widespread spin-resonant particles which both collect raindrops and react to certain scalar frequency pulses from these systems.  imagine these systems are so widespread and powerful they are capable of much, much more than just these few things described here.

[anyone can buy a used but in shape field-standardized geiger counter on ebay for about fifty bucks that works like a charm, and folks if youre out buying seafood at your local costco, i suggest taking it along with.  you make look a bit foolish to others, but think how stupid Letterman looked as he tried to prove seafood was safe after Fuku live on his show, and the geiger counter started ticking and screaming as the needle pegged - and then as if to say the instrument was wrong, they all dove in and took a healthy bite of the prepared fish.  nothing to see here, move along.  http://blogs.browardpalmbeach.com/cleanplatecharlie/2011/06/eric_ripert_...]

now, forget all this and return to your normal brainwashed state of thinking that this was all unplanned; one giant accident.

and have a nice day.

 

for the latest energy news including fukushima updates, I read http://www.enenews.com

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 07:46 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

Well, people, be warned: While it is not a bad idea at all to get yourself a geiger counter, these are not appropriate for the investigation of food. They can provide a hint, shirley, but if one for example wants to analyse a fish, only the surface can be inspected, while the inner parts of that fish will not be measurable due to the self-shielding by the fish's tissue. Gamma radiation can be detected (and if you find some: don't eat the fish!), but alpha- and beta-radiation will be mostly shielded, so your counter won't measure them sufficiently. (The fish would have to be dried (in vacuum, the evaporated water has to be measured, too), grinded to powder, and that powder could then be measured. Of course, one loses the fish this way. And depending on the contamination of the fish, you'd likely end up with radioactive waste you'd have to dispose of according to heavy regulations.)

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 18:41 | Link to Comment Element
Element's picture

Or you sell it to Findus to make fish fingers.

 

 

 

sorry ... just horsing around

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:56 | Link to Comment nowhereman
nowhereman's picture

As outragious as your post may sound to the sheeple congregation, all one need do is look into the work of genius Nicola Tesla and ask yourself why the government stole his designs and made his research findings top secret.  When  wiki links you to occultists and conspiracy theorists you now somethng is there en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikola_Tesla    

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 14:21 | Link to Comment NaN
NaN's picture

Hey Brixton, are you working on a movie script?

(When they kick out your front door...)

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 07:35 | Link to Comment papaswamp
papaswamp's picture

For those having trouble understanding the issue with the radiation levels...( I had to look it since I did). ~0.25 uSv is equivalent to airport security X-ray. The new glowing all night Olympic stadium is kicking out ~ 0.4 uSv/hr. In other words....you are getting x-rayed twice every hour. Now just imagine an athlete staying for 2 weeks....

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:17 | Link to Comment BigInJapan
BigInJapan's picture

Yes... but... Japanese radiation is the best in the world because... Abenomics!!!

Radiation inflation.

Jump higher, run faster, throw further, than ever before. Gold medals and world records will be crushed by gamma exposed Japanese super-athletes! Truly Japan's moent of ascension as world leader is just around the corner!

GANBARE NIPPON!!!

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:33 | Link to Comment djsmps
djsmps's picture

This should be spectacular for the night time synchronized swimming.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:41 | Link to Comment overmedicatedun...
overmedicatedundersexed's picture

exposed to radiation at 30,000 feet, just the flight there gives you a chest x rays worth, don't know how much backround exposure going thru TSA security, so why go ?? why fly?? japan keeps getting into atomic events must be that karma thing for WWII

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 09:03 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

The radiation from the flight would last as long as the few hours to reach your target. The radiation from ingested particles may stay with you for the remainder of your lifetime, thus slowly providing you with a steady dose-rate, absolutely independant of any background radiation.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:44 | Link to Comment Downtoolong
Downtoolong's picture

Look on the bright side. Perhaps like Radioactive Man of Marvel Comics fame some competitors will develop superhuman capabilities. The next Olympics in Tokyo could be the greatest record smashing event of all time.

Well know for sure if someone runs the mile in 38 seconds. Hell, that might even be a spectator just trying to flee the place.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:51 | Link to Comment 10PastMidnight
10PastMidnight's picture

when in doubt, ask a non biased Japanese resident, one who is not a gubbment\tepco employee.

i would say read it and weep, but that would not be an analogy and very sad.

http://fukushima-diary.com/

 

there wont be any games in japan that aren't already being played on us all, question is how soon will you find out the truth and also the athletes, i'm thinking cumulative strontium, cesium and iodine aren't something to enjoy.

 

 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 08:57 | Link to Comment Haager
Haager's picture

I'm only visiting Japan through Youtube and television. Will I be in danger, too?

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 09:10 | Link to Comment shinobi-7
shinobi-7's picture

The South China Morning Post is definitively where you should get your news about Japan. Pravda also had "interesting" things to say about Washington in the good old days. Not that it was untrue of course, just a slight bias here and there...

Tokyo was very briefly affected by the nuclear cloud from Fukushima so there is some remnants of radioactivity almost everywhere. (There are many sites mostly in Japanese with hundreds of daily readings. Private, not TEPCO sponsored!) The few areas of concern like the city of Kashiwa are well known. But concern is not exactly "panic".

The ambient radioactivity in Tokyo is very low, as some readers mentioned, lower than many other cities in the world. These are the microsieverts. What is not discussed enough in Japan are the Bekerels: The radioactivity you ingest. The reason being that it requires complex machines and is difficult to measure. It should be done systematically for everything (food mostly) coming from the Fukushima Prefecture and it is not. This said, it is well known that the year of the wine bottles from the 1960s and 1970s can be precisely identified thanks to the nuclear fallouts from the atmospheric tests of those years and it doesn't seems to have a major negative effect on the price of Chateau Petrus 1961!

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 09:11 | Link to Comment Running On Bing...
Running On Bingo Fuel's picture

All I know is the last Chicken of the Sea that I purchase in bulk was from Sams Club on Saturday March 12th, 2011. And that's going to be it.

Over.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 14:32 | Link to Comment NaN
NaN's picture

True, the Chinese have a grudge against the Japanese (and rightly so), but http://www.enenews.com/ has also documented soil contamination in Tokyo.

Testing air filters is a proxy for lung contamination.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 09:50 | Link to Comment LawyerScum
LawyerScum's picture

All of this radiation will surely increase the rate of tentacle attacks on schoolgirls.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 11:04 | Link to Comment Bearwagon
Bearwagon's picture

You mean, like Urotsukidoji ?

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 10:45 | Link to Comment sgorem
sgorem's picture

kinda looks like the 'ZILLA movies i watched growing up as a kid are turning out to be quite prophetic. wonder what it's like living on an island reactor where the inhabitants are not only endangered by the enviroment of radiation, but the blatant fucking lies of the ptb.......and after having TWO Atomic bombs dropped on Her by the Western Saviors.

 

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 10:48 | Link to Comment Fix It Again Timmy
Fix It Again Timmy's picture

Just wear lead shorts and shirts - problem solved!...

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 11:19 | Link to Comment UrbanBard
UrbanBard's picture

How dangerous this is?

Let's say that you go to Tokyo from Los Angeles and stay two weeks. How much of a radiation dose would you get? 0.484 micro Sieverts per hour times 24 hours times 14 days equals 162 micro Sieverts. What would that compare to in daily life? This is equivalent to two round trips from LA to New York City or one round trip from LA to Tokyo. Both the trip and the stay at the Olympics would equal 13% of what you normally receive in radiation each year.

This trip would not be dangerous at all. Go and have a good time.

What about the residents of Tokyo? 0.484 x 24 x 365 = 4240 micro Sieverts. This is equal to the background radiation before the accident. How dangerous is a doubling of radiation? Not very. The residents of Leadville, Colorado have a higher radiation count than that, yet they have no higher cancer rates than in LA.

This is a needless concern. This is panic-mongering.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 11:28 | Link to Comment shinobi-7
shinobi-7's picture

Absolutely! And don't forget that these high readings are ALWAYS found in the gutters where radioactivity tends to accumulate which is of course not where most people spend their days. There are plenty of reasons why the olympics should have gone elsewhere: risk of a major earthquake or even sooner a major default. But radioactivity in Tokyo is not one of them!

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 12:32 | Link to Comment Hohum
Hohum's picture

Urban Bard,

We'll know soon enough if it's panic mongering and you're probably right about two weeks being okay.  I think your analysis, though, forgets the time factor for, well, the people who live there.  

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 14:39 | Link to Comment NaN
NaN's picture

Bzzzzt. You cannot compare irradiation while flying to ingestion from food or dust inhalation.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 18:01 | Link to Comment red_pill
red_pill's picture

You are confusing external radiation exposure to internal.... Since radiation intensity falls off with the cube of the distance from the source, internal emitters, positioned as they are right next to other body cells, cause much more damage than external sources of the same magnitude. Plus, specific radionuclides are attraced to certain organs...Iodone to the thyroid, cesium to muscles...especially the heart, and strontium to bone, therefore concentrating them even more in certain locations of the body.

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 11:36 | Link to Comment orangegeek
orangegeek's picture

steroids cure radiation poisoning

 

no issue here

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 12:37 | Link to Comment PennilessPauper
PennilessPauper's picture

Free Cesium-137 induced heart attack with every event!

Or Strontium 90 induced brain aneurism.

Don't worry though the corrupt fucking Japanese doctors will list Aneurism or Heart attack as the cause of death.  Not the radio active isotopes as the root cause.

What a sick joke Humans have become!

Sun, 10/13/2013 - 14:32 | Link to Comment world_debt_slave
world_debt_slave's picture

the gov propaganda "it's good for you, trust us."

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!