5 Things To Ponder This Weekend

Tyler Durden's picture

Submitted by Lance Roberts of STA Wealth Management,

 

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ramacers's picture

there should not be a "weekend". it's weakness.

kushmere's picture

Come visit us on Bitcoin, where the party never ends. (Until the most recent bubble pops!)

http://bestbitcoinsites.wordpress.com

SafelyGraze's picture

pondering how birds appear in court and win lawsuits against corporations

http://www.wunderground.com/news/wind-energy-company-pleads-guilty-eagle...

 

icanhasbailout's picture

Also on the ponder list for the weekend, if you should so desire: healthcare.gov as an identity theft machine, with exclusive info unearthed from a primary source by yours truly.

http://thebullelephant.com/healthcare-gov-is-an-identity-theft-machine/

spdrdr's picture

Nothing wrong with that at all.

If I was a life or disability insurer, I'd certainly pay top dollar to anyone who could produce verified medical records of the putative insured parties.

If a person claiming a benefit was found to be engaging in unsafe lifestyle practices (such as regularly purchasing cigarettes, alchohol, or unhealthy food products (McD, KFC, etc), then I as an insurer would sure want to know about it!

I don't know what your problem is - no bennies for fatties, cheaper premia for the rest of us!

Reap what you sow!

 

 

 

fonestar's picture
"5 Things To Ponder This Weekend"

 

Why are Bitcoiners always right?

The_Prisoner's picture

Well, the birds are real, not fictions like corporations.

SafelyGraze's picture

"Well, the birds are real, not fictions like corporations or courts"

exactly!

+100

plus the birds pay taxes and vote. unlike etc etc.

and write laws. unlike etc etc.

kabuki birds.

Dick Buttkiss's picture

Oh, the baby's just crying, kushmere.

Wait 'til it's a big strong boy.

nmewn's picture

Forward estimates...lol...its as stupid a metric as it gets.

"Hey look, who could have ever expected our exceptionally well engineered and highly sought after cars would ignite into a flaming ball of death when the airbag deploys? Our "team" is working around the clock to figure out who supplied these defective airbags!"

Yeah.

Yenbot's picture

Man, I almost bought it.

Just For Fun - Stupid Things That Finance People Say via Morgan Housel/Motley Fool

That was a close one, Tyler...


-this announcement brought to you by People(?) for a Bigger Gov't. moar Regulations, and Fake Money... (POAR)

it aint easy's picture

One thing to Ponder this weekend is how to get over the shame of losing to the Vikings. :(

prains's picture

don't Vikings generally kill all the males then ass rape all the women, take the goats, burn the buildings then ass rape your women again??

 

 

you're a long way from home little friend, make believe with a synthetic rubber ball and large men in tights is more a homo erotic thing than anything else.... real vikings eat babies and fuck your wife till dead,

 

get over it

spdrdr's picture

Probably confusing the Vikings (red hair, full-on manly red beards) with the Maoris (black hair, sporadic black beards, cannibals).

Just sayin'

 

FredFlintstone's picture

The maori's have casinos now, don't they?

Zero Point's picture

Maoris would have got on pretty well with vikings actually I reckon.

Similar tribal culture and even mythologies.

They would have had some fuckin awesome fights too.

The Maori would only ass rape your mother if she asked nicely I think. Fuck stick.

it aint easy's picture

Guess people here don't watch football.. :)

wisehiney's picture
Encyclopedia Virginia: Munford, Robert (d. 1783) nearly broke my whole body getting to his gravesite, I cleaned it off so's that you could see it. Heavenly place for them to find my skeleton, way back in the beautiful hardwoods. Had an especially good day. 
RaceToTheBottom's picture

Challenges are good.   Was this chap a financier?  a Economic maestro?  A wallstreet criminal (sorry for the redundancy)?

I hope he wasn't just a playwrite.  No only financial mucky mucks count in the world...

sarc

disabledvet's picture

"pro forma earnings." those were the days. there's no way we get a "reprise." in other words good luck recreating the three one trillion dollar securitization markets that Alan Greenspan deemed appropriate for total annihilation...and did indeed do so i might add. Everything else has gone pretty much per the Paulson Plan (react--to the liquidity crisis, replensish--via TARP, TALF, cash for clunkers, first time home buyer credit, HAMP, HARP...never did get my "bikini beach volleyball on the moon" though), restore (QEternal)...but not those things. Since so much credit is extended in...ahem..."modern banking"...well, let's just say "recovery risk looms large." the Bank of North Dakota appears to have solved the "demand for credit problem." via "massive oil production, double digit economic growth and 2 percent unemployment" i might add. for everyone else? ooops. sorry!

q99x2's picture

No need to ponder. If Hugh Hendry was forced to participate due to Bankster fraud the end is nigh. Man they are going to put the crash on, break the markets, let the panic spread and buy that shit up pennies on the dollar. That's the way they do it. They are banksters. That's what banksters do.

TPTB_r_TBTF's picture

break it, buy it, fix it, sell it

break it again, buy it again, fix it again, sell it again, break it...

 

TPTB have that process down pat.

TPTB r TBTF.

 

Teach your kids how to do that.  Teach your grandkids how to do that...

and build up a multi-millenial Family Dynasty

(be the 1%).

Cursive's picture

@TBTF_r_TBTF

Would this scheme be possible without money?  Most (All?) of our macro-economic problems are the result of money maniulation (He who controls the money supply....).  Most people have focused on money reforms as the solution.  If money is the problem, we should at least begin contemplating a world without money as one possible option. 

Cursive's picture

Oh, for the love of money!  Sell your soul to the rentiers!

TPTB_r_TBTF's picture

> we should at least begin contemplating ...

 

except, "we" have no say in the matter.

"They" will provide any necessary monetary reform.

 

btw, the neg is not from me...

+1 for contemplating.

LetThemEatRand's picture

If your stock market returns exceed fundamental values for more than four months, call your doctor.  You may have a medical condition known as The Bernanke.  

Cursive's picture

@max2205

Thx for the clip.  Can't wait for the solar-powered high-altitude drone that stays aloft for years.  Why is it that people will pay upwards of $10 for a movie ticket to see a plot similar to what's happening in real life, but the vast majority of people could care less about the reality that the surveillance/police state is tightening its grip every day?  Oh, and about that movie - better if it's in 3-D to simulate the reality that we're trying to ignore.

smlbizman's picture

cursive, my wife loves to read...but when i tell her the greatest story ever told is happening now, i get the , meh....

Cursive's picture

@smlbizman

I thought the greatest story ever told was about two thous - oh, nevermind.... :D

Cursive's picture

Well, here it is, folks.  Glenn Hubbard is widely considered a "conservative" from the Chicago School/Milton Freidman mold (think laissez-faire markets and/or limited government).  In other words, not a big government Adlai-Stevenson-type liberal.  And here is what he believes should have happened post-2009.  Is there any doubt that people like Glenn Hubbard are nothing but useful idiots for the international cabal of rentiers that suck the wealth and vitality from the rest of the populace?

But Mr. Hubbard is unsure if the current bond-buying program is having much positive effect on the economy, saying it does create the risk of asset bubbles.

 

He lays the blame on the government rather than Fed policy makers.

 

'The problem is not the Federal Reserve, the problem has been the government,' said Mr. Hubbard, the dean of the Columbia Business School. Rather than buying $85 billion a month in securities, the more appropriate policy response would have been a big government investment in infrastructure and other needs, he said.

 

Congress, which would need to approve that type of investment, has instead moved to curtail government spending in the past year.


 

 

 

observer007's picture

 

Bitcoin $ 2000 by year end?

Today $ 900 ---

Realtime quotes and news:

http://btcpost.net/index.php

Dan The Man's picture

Ponder this  (pointing at crotch)

RaceToTheBottom's picture

Stocks have reached a permanently high plateau.....

Sarc

the grateful unemployed's picture

1) what happens when the money supply shrinks (real deleveraging)?

2) what happens when POTUS leaves office early?

3) what happens when the forever war ends (and government spending contracts)?

4) what happens when noncompliance of the ACA act is revealed to be higher than the flipside of Obamas approval rating?

5) what happens when world population peaks, and those fibonacci (economic) numbers reverse, as the number of new consumers being born to shop, goes parabollically lower?

moneybots's picture

" But, now the stock market is back to fully or fairly priced, at a P/E ratio of 16 or 17."

 

A recent posting said CAPE is a 24 P/E.

moneybots's picture

"Stanley Fischer, former governor of the Bank of Israel, agrees that the Fed's early action helped avoid an even deeper crisis. He added that the Fed can successfully unwind its stimulus programs."

 

The FED's actions are deepening the crisis.  Math is additive.  More debt is piling up. 

Apparently Fischer would rather have chronic 10% real unemployment, than seen unemployment jump to 15% or so with real unemployment being down to 6%now, with the market having been cleared in 2009.

Worse then would have been much better for now.  Fischer should study the 1921 recession and its aftermath.

moneybots's picture

'The problem is not the Federal Reserve, the problem has been the government,' said Mr. Hubbard, the dean of the Columbia Business School. Rather than buying $85 billion a month in securities, the more appropriate policy response would have been a big government investment in infrastructure and other needs, he said."

 

Infrastructure would have required debt.  The FED would still be buying 85 billion a month in securities. 

 

"Congress, which would need to approve that type of investment, has instead moved to curtail government spending in the past year."

 

That is becasue debt is piling up to total 17 trillion to date.

devo's picture

Just wait to see the market's reaction when they increase QE and buy other assets, like stocks and bitcoins.

Goldilocks's picture

Nothing But Trouble: "Mr. Bonestripper"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enUo-1TjdEs (2:39)

StychoKiller's picture

6th thing to ponder:  debt-ceiling kabuki returns for the last time again!  It's gonna get rave reviews again (or is it electrolytes?)

Bernankenstein's picture

Show me 1 share of stock anywhere that is not owned. What the heck does underowned mean to some people?

dunce's picture

Investors have little or no control over any of the points mentioned. It is simply que sera,sera. These matters will be handled those geniuses in residence in DC. Obama the omniscient. Getting really drunk won't help but you will not have to think about your fate for a while.