The IMF's Emerging Confusion On Emerging Markets

Tyler Durden's picture

The IMF's woeful forecasting record, chronicled extensively before, has just taken yet another hit, following the latest flip flop on emerging markets. Try to spot the common theme of these assessments by the IMF.

IMF Chief economist Olivier Blanchard, April 11, 2011 (source):

"In emerging market economies, by contrast, the crisis left no lasting wounds. Their initial fiscal and financial positions were typically stronger, and the adverse effects of the crisis were more muted. High underlying growth and low interest rates are making fiscal adjustment much easier. Exports have recovered, and whatever shortfall in external demand they experienced has typically been made up through increases in domestic demand. Capital outflows have turned into capital inflows, due to both better growth prospects and higher interest rates than in the advanced economies. The challenge for most emerging market economies is thus quite different from that of the advanced economies—namely, how to avoid overheating in the face of closing output gaps and higher capital flows."

IMF Chief economist Olivier Blanchard, July 9, 2013 (source):

"If you look country by country it seems to be specific . . . so in China it looks like unproductive investment, in Brazil it looks like low investment and in India it looks like policy and administrative uncertainty. But you wonder whether there is not something behind. I think behind this is a slowdown in underlying growth – not the cyclical component but just the average rate. It’s clear that these countries are not going to grow as fast as they did before the crisis.”

IMF Chief economist Olivier Blanchard, January 23, 2014 (source)

"Finally, we forecast that both emerging market and developing economies will sustain strong growth"

A few days later, EMs around the globe crashed, and central banks virtually everywhere had to step in to bail out their crashing currencies, and hit the tape with even more impressive verbal intervention every several hours.

Finally, today we get IMF economist Alejandro Werner, January 30, 2014 (source)

"Conditions in global financial markets will stay tighter than they were before the U.S. central bank’s “taper talk” in the first half of 2013, translating into higher international borrowing costs, particularly with the recent volatility in emerging markets.... sustained turbulence in emerging markets could tighten global financial conditions further.... Rebuilding fiscal buffers, and using monetary policy and flexible exchange rates to absorb shocks where possible, remains the order of the day."

In other words, going from a forecast of "high underlying growth", to "not going to grow as fast as they did", to "sustain strong growth", to violent EM crash, to "turbulence", "volatility", and urging EMs to "using monetary policy to absorb shocks", what is clear is that nobody knows what is going on, nobody has any handle on the future of Emerging Markets, but let's all just pretend that the MIT central-planners in control, are in control, and all shall be well.