Chris Christie Booed At Times Square By "We Hate Traffic"-Chanting New Yorkers

Tyler Durden's picture

Philadelpia may have booed Santa Claus, but last night it was New York's turn to boo a not so jolly, calorie-challenged man, embattled NJ governor Chris Christie, during the ceremonial Super Bowl “handoff” at Times square. However, in the aftermath of Friday's NYT revelations that evidence exists that Christie was aware about the real reason behind the bridge closures as they happened, onlookers only had a brief 30 seconds during which to boo Christie before he promptly departed the stage on his own.

The Post describes Saturday's event as follows:

Amid a chorus of boos, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie took a Times Square stage Saturday for the ceremonial Super Bowl “handoff” — then ran for daylight from “Bridgegate” questions.

 

The usually loquacious governor spoke for just 30 seconds at the event, during which one detractor jeered, “We hate traffic! We hate traffic!”

 

The ceremony, during which Christie and Gov. Cuomo passed on Super Bowl responsibilities to next year’s host, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, came a day after a disgraced Christie crony claimed “evidence exists” to show Christie knew about the George Washington Bridge traffic snarl as it unfolded.

 

“We look forward to handing it over to Arizona,” Christie told the crowd. “I was proud to be in New Orleans last year to accept the handoff on behalf of the region.”

 

As he scrambled to leave, Christie ignored a Post reporter’s questions on the new “evidence” mentioned in a letter released Friday by former Port Authority official David Wildstein.

Guess the governor should have handed out some more Christiephones with which to buy the affection of the great unwashed in advance. In the meantime, Christie defended himself with the following 700 page email leaked yesterday:

 

The above summarized as to the reasons suggested by the Christie camp for Wildstein's allegations:

Because as a “a 16-year-old kid” he filed a lawsuit over a school board election and was “publicly accused by his high school social studies teacher of deceptive behavior.” Because he was, according to Christie, a “tumultuous” person (not the correct usage of that word, Governor, but whatever). Because he was “a political animal” who had “a controversial tenure” as the mayor of Livingston. Because he “made moves that were not productive.”

Sadly for Christie, at this point few are buying it, as yet another politician is dragged right back into the same maelstrom of petty cronyism and corruption from which he fought so hard to show he is not part of, ahead of a presidential campaign that is now all but finished.