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America's Make-Work Sectors (Healthcare & Higher Education) Have Run Out of Oxygen

Tyler Durden's picture





 

Submitted by Charles Hugh-Smith of OfTwoMinds blog,

We can no longer afford the expansion of healthcare/education or their out-of-control costs.

If we strip away obscuring narratives, we can clearly see that the two employment sectors that have expanded rain or shine for decades have functioned as gigantic make-work projects. I refer of course to healthcare and education, specifically higher education.

We can see the outsized gains in these sectors by comparing total population growth to the number of full-time jobs and the number of jobs in education/healthcare since 1990. Here is total population: a 27% increase since 1990:

To separate out the wheat (jobs that support households) from the chaff (part-time work that cannot support a household--even a job with one hour a week is counted as a P-T job), let's use full-time employment as a baseline. Full-time employment rose about 20% since 1990, less than population.

Education/healthcare employment rose by 81% since 1990--three times the population growth rate and four times the percentage increase in full-time employment.

For more on these sectors' growth, please read Mish's recent entry, Ominous Looking Picture in Healthcare and Education Jobs.

If education and healthcare had expanded to meet the needs of a larger population, employment in the sectors would have increased about 30% since 1990, not 81%. So 50% of the sectors' expansion is above and beyond population growth.

Have education and medical services improved by 50% since 1990? In many cases, it can be argued the yield on our investments in these sectors has declined even as employment in the sectors has soared. Consider the study Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses which concluded that "American higher education is characterized by limited or no learning for a large proportion of students."

While student loans have soared to over $1 trillion, with direct Federal loans ballooning from $115 billion to over $700 billion in a few short years, only 37% of freshmen at four-year colleges graduate in four years (58% finally graduate in six years), and 53% of recent college graduates under the age of 25 are unemployed or doing work they could have done without going to college.

Why has employment soared in higher education? Look no further than bloated administration and non-teaching staff: New Analysis Shows Problematic Boom In Higher Ed Administrators:
 

In all, from 1987 until 2011-12--the most recent academic year for which comparable figures are available—universities and colleges collectively added 517,636 administrators and professional employees, according to the analysis by the New England Center for Investigative Reporting.“There’s just a mind-boggling amount of money per student that’s being spent on administration,” said Andrew Gillen, a senior researcher at the institutes. “It raises a question of priorities.”

The ratio of nonacademic employees to faculty has also doubled. There are now two nonacademic employees at public and two and a half at private universities and colleges for every one full-time, tenure-track member of the faculty.

The number of employees in central system offices has increased six-fold since 1987, and the number of administrators in them by a factor of more than 34.

As for healthcare in the U.S.: despite soaring employment and expenditures, life expectancy in the U.S. since 1990 has fallen well below that of the United Kingdom (U.K.), a nation whose healthcare system is widely criticized in the U.S. (World Bank, Life Expectancy at Birth)

Yes, there are many metrics of overall health, but the U.S. has not experienced a 50% increase since 1990 in any of them. If anything, the overall health of the populace has arguably declined, even as the nation pours almost 20% of its gross domestic product (GDP) into healthcare.

This is not a slam on those earning a living in these sectors; it is simply a description of sectors that have functioned as "make-work" sources of jobs.Consider the appallingly perverse dynamic of student loans: now that tens of millions of students need student loans to pay sky-high tuition and fees, colleges need huge administrative staffs to manage the student loan process.

The yield (in earnings) on the increasingly unaffordable college degree is declining sharply:

The enormous sums of money needed to pay for these make-work sectors is coming out of household incomes that are stagnating for 90% of all households.

If we subtract healthcare and debt service from household earnings, we find that wages/salaries are in recession territory:

In other words, the nation can no longer support these enormous make-work sectors, where employment and expenditures rise while the yield on those gargantuan investments actually declines--a classic case of diminishing returns.

Consider the percentage of healthcare employment that is paper-shuffling resulting from America's dysfunctional pastiche of private cartels and Federal programs; I have seen estimates of 30%, but this doesn't include the staggering sums lost to fraud, embezzlement, over-charging, useless or even harmful procedures, duplicate or needless tests, and so on.

As I have often noted, if we compare our per-person expenses for healthcare with other advanced democracies such as Australia and Japan, we find those nations spend roughly 50% of what the U.S. spends per-person, with better and more evenly distributed results. This strongly suggests that healthcare should cost half of what it currently costs, if the U.S. sickcare system wasn't so wasteful, ineffective and dysfunctional.

As for tuition costs: I have demonstrated in my book The Nearly Free University and The Emerging Economy: The Revolution in Higher Education that the tuition for a four-year bachelor's degree could (and should) cost $5,000, not $100,000 or $200,000. The technology and tools already exist to accredit the student, not the institution and provide distributed courses, adaptive learning and real-world, workplace-based workshops for a tiny fraction of the ineffective, unaffordable system of higher education we are currently burdened with.

Once costs decline 95%, there is no need for student loans or the bloated bureaucracies needed to manage the parasitic student-loan system.

Why is employment in these sectors finally slowing? For the simple reason that they've run out of oxygen: we can no longer afford their expansion or their out-of-control costs. Much cheaper and more effective systems are within reach, if only we look past failed models and politically powerful cartels and fiefdoms.

 


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Mon, 02/10/2014 - 09:54 | Link to Comment Johnny Cocknballs
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er, what about the financial sector?

 

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 09:55 | Link to Comment LawsofPhysics
LawsofPhysics's picture

"what about the financial sector?"-  Better ask Hank "tanks in the streets" Paulson or John Corzine...

Let me be clear, roll the motherfucking guillotines, nothing changes otherwise.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 09:57 | Link to Comment GetZeeGold
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they've run out of oxygen

 

Oxygen panels?

 

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 09:58 | Link to Comment mayhem_korner
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Total Recall.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:09 | Link to Comment Uncle Remus
Uncle Remus's picture

"Consider that a divorce."

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:03 | Link to Comment Clint Liquor
Clint Liquor's picture

President Urkel is committed to 'investing' in education and healthcare, so everything should be fine.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 16:19 | Link to Comment hobopants
hobopants's picture

For some reason I thought this was hilarious. I'm waiting for the day when everything goes to hell and he just gets up to the podium and says "Did I do that?!" with a canned laughter track rolling.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:12 | Link to Comment BLOTTO
BLOTTO's picture

The guillotine is only good when you sever the right beasts head.

.

Thats why we keep going around in circles.

.

We aren't snuffing out the right monster.

.

Wake me up when the Royals are brought down, Rothschild, etc...not just sock puppets.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:14 | Link to Comment Mad_max
Mad_max's picture

"Let me be clear, roll the motherfucking guillotines, nothing changes otherwise."

 

too quick

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanged,_drawn_and_quartered

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:23 | Link to Comment eclectic syncretist
eclectic syncretist's picture

If you want to go Medieval nothing beats impalement for making a lasting impression.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impalement

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:37 | Link to Comment Hubbs
Hubbs's picture

Now yer talking my my language.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:09 | Link to Comment Ban KKiller
Ban KKiller's picture

Some of the major criminals AT THE TOP..Northern Trust. Complete crooks and traitors whose god is power.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:16 | Link to Comment dtwn
dtwn's picture

Nice phrase to start the week:

"roll the motherfucking guillotines"

when I read that, I hear Samuel L. Jackson saying it. . . . . .

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:03 | Link to Comment Mister Kitty
Mister Kitty's picture

I don't care about the financial sector.  I'm an ignorant pauper.  What I really want is socialized medicine.  My teeth need fixing, and I want Uncle Sam to pay for it. 

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:10 | Link to Comment ArkansasAngie
ArkansasAngie's picture

If ignorant paupers wanting good teeth were the problem, we could have solved that trillions ago.

It's the layers of disintermediation that prolifierate in all directions that allow the few to rule the many.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:24 | Link to Comment LawsofPhysics
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Yes, too many over compensated paper-pushers who's labor is of no real value.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 16:17 | Link to Comment Offthebeach
Offthebeach's picture

Early '70s I go to town hall with my father with his hand drawn plans for a building permit for a ranch house. 30 minutes, maybe 50$.

Now? Same house is illegal. Dictated 50% cost increase. Fully done Architect plans. Plus one or more engineer stamps. Approval might take a year on a taxed buildible lot. Or not. If not forget getting tax money back. You'll need a lawyer too. By and large more money is spent on gov and "helpers" then the laborers and trades that do the actuall work work.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 16:31 | Link to Comment hobopants
hobopants's picture

It's amazing how the species has survived so long without building inspectors and architects! We should have all been crushed under blue-print free wigwams and adobe buildings long ago... 

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:49 | Link to Comment negative rates
negative rates's picture

Tooth fairy insurance aint cheap ya know, especially after that excellent education you got from uncle sam in the first place.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:05 | Link to Comment toady
toady's picture

Shhhhh... They're doing Gods work, don't ya know.

It's every other sector, group, party, etc. Not the global ponzi known as the financial sector.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:14 | Link to Comment Hubbs
Hubbs's picture

Wrong department. Try looking under theft and embezzlement.

Back to the topic:I get criticized at the hospital when I state, Do you think we are really paying for all this largesse?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:28 | Link to Comment Jannn
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Guest Post: The Gold Market, Part 2 http://www.ingoldwetrust.ch/guest-post-gold-market-part-2

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 13:47 | Link to Comment Offthebeach
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So long as there is a nickle to be vacumed, a gold tooth or organ to be harvested, or a freeman to be serfed, there's opportunity for the hungry.

There is, at least, a hundred years of sheeple shearing.

Scale man, scale! The world is a big place and there's lots of thieving to be done. Not all of it will go smoothly nor successfully. After the easy kills, the sheeple get progressively craftier.

In short, plenty of work .

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 18:43 | Link to Comment hobopants
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Don't forget prisons!...oh wait that is part of the healthcare and education thing huh?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 09:54 | Link to Comment LawsofPhysics
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Don't worry, their lobbyists on K-street will make sure your "representation" steals more of your wealth.

see the real problem yet?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:14 | Link to Comment asteroids
asteroids's picture

When the theft stops, expect to see a total collapse of both systems.  When? Don't know, but the sooner the better.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:16 | Link to Comment ArkansasAngie
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The theives are not going to have a v-8 moment and say "wow ... we should stop doing that."

Theives stop when they get caught and forced to face the consequence.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:20 | Link to Comment FredFlintstone
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The theft will stop when there is nothing left to steal.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 09:57 | Link to Comment Sudden Debt
Sudden Debt's picture

Here's a Asperine for that braintumor of yours!!

THAT WILL BE 250.000 BUCKS PLEASE!!!

broke?...

WE'LL TAKE YOUR HOUSE! GOOD AS MONEY!!

SEE YA TOMORROW!

 

AND KEEP EATING "NATURAL" FOOD!! IT'S GOOD FOR YA! 

http://youtu.be/AftZshnP8fs

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 13:08 | Link to Comment TBT or not TBT
TBT or not TBT's picture

Health care costs would go WAY down if we just shot sick and injured people DEAD, right then and there. No fukkin health care costs anymore. Bada bing bada boom.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 09:58 | Link to Comment mayhem_korner
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Sustainable. 

/s

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:01 | Link to Comment Duc888
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Government is the biggest "make -work" program in existance.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:28 | Link to Comment NoDebt
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Amen.  Everything they touch (take over) becomes a make-work program.  And then you get this little gem:

"In other words, the nation can no longer support these enormous make-work sectors, where employment and expenditures rise while the yield on those gargantuan investments actually declines-"

Obviously, they MUST be supported and they WILL be supported until such point as the government can no longer borrow/print to cover the largesse.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:05 | Link to Comment devo
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Healthcare is growing and will continue to grow.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:09 | Link to Comment toady
toady's picture

It's all part of devolution.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:34 | Link to Comment cro_maat
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Great comment. Few realize that the vast majority of us are devolving and that evolution is not automatic. We have to leave the matrix to evolve. All the Statist apparatus is designed to put us to sleep and deactivate any connection with our own inner Divine. The AMA is a perfect tool of the black lodge as they can mandate harmful chemicals (vaccines, psych meds, etc.) and put up barriers to entry ensuring monopoly status of sanctioned healthcare. Meanwhile they will villify anyone who attempts to live naturally (in harmony with Nature) and spiritually evolve.

Of course if you really want to grow spiritually you need some petty tyrants to stir up your defective egos. Petty tyrants we have in spades so all in all it is a good time to do the Work.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 13:16 | Link to Comment TBT or not TBT
TBT or not TBT's picture

The film "Idiocracy" proposes a far simpler, already pervasive mechanism for devolution. I'm going with that, as opposed to various conspiracy theories requiring thousands of bad smart people to act in concert, yet with hermetic secrecy and no credible motivation. Occam and all that.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 19:58 | Link to Comment RafterManFMJ
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You do realize Occam was a treasonous agent of the Lizard People, right?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:31 | Link to Comment Winston of Oceania
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As planned people are starting to go without.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:51 | Link to Comment Emergency Ward
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And being forced into back-alley treatments when the front doors are shut.....Wait: I thought that was only for, uh..........what will be the hidden death toll of the ACA?  It will not be publicized.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 13:20 | Link to Comment TBT or not TBT
TBT or not TBT's picture

There was no unemployment in the USSR, just as there are no gays in Iran, and no vicious political operatives in our civil service(such as the unionized, 100% democrat IRS).

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:08 | Link to Comment Debt Slave
Debt Slave's picture

How do you starve a parasite? Kill the host!

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:13 | Link to Comment Calculus99
Calculus99's picture

US health care costs are a fucking joke.

I'm English, was in Florida a year back and forgot some run-of-the-mill pills that need a subscription. I went to the local hospital, sat down with a nice lady Doctor, explained my needs and she wrote out said sub. Pay over there she said.

When I was going to pay I naively though the pills would be no more than $30.

Guess what the bill was, $350!

The only solace I can find is that at least they weren't ripping off the limey foreigner, US citizens seem to take it up the arse as well.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:32 | Link to Comment Winston of Oceania
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That is because American drug companies are forced to sell at a loss to countries with socialized medicine like GB or Canada and the US customer pays full fare and enough to cover the cost of the foreign subsidy.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:41 | Link to Comment Debt Slave
Debt Slave's picture

Yeah I went to my Dr last week and got an Rx for some antibiotic ear drops. Went to the pharmacy and found out they wanted $250 for a 7.5mL bottle. Are you effin kidding me? No way I'm not paying for that even with my company's insurance. I told them forget it and I'll get what I need that is more REASONABLE, like $15.

What a joke. No wonder the Dr is always asking if I have Rx insurance. Next time I am gonna say NO, I don't.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:55 | Link to Comment Big Corked Boots
Big Corked Boots's picture

Go back to your doctor and ask him what he got in exchange for writing that perscription. Those pharma reps get around....

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 13:21 | Link to Comment TBT or not TBT
TBT or not TBT's picture

Pharma reps are kinda hot, very often.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:08 | Link to Comment WillyGroper
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Welcome to the party!

It's my understanding from my limey friend that your NHS is in the process of being privatized also.

we're screwed.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:17 | Link to Comment Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

Pretty sure the cost of everything changes if you get rid of government and the law. Solves that pesky entitlement problem as well. Might have to carry a gun and form communities that are supportive, but is that so bad?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:36 | Link to Comment shovelhead
shovelhead's picture

Ask the people in Afganistan.

They're currently working with a govt. overreach problem.

Unfortunately, it's not their own.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:42 | Link to Comment Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

We're bringing slavery to the masses and making them pay for it. Nice work if you can get it( and you don't mind that whole luciferian thingy).

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 13:27 | Link to Comment TBT or not TBT
TBT or not TBT's picture

Three Cups of Tea! Ah NATO, what an unholy clusterfuck. Coulda been worse...a UN clusterfuck.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:22 | Link to Comment Doubleguns
Doubleguns's picture

As for tuition costs: I have demonstrated in my book The Nearly Free University and The Emerging Economy: The Revolution in Higher Education that the tuition for a four-year bachelor's degree could (and should) cost $5,000, not $100,000 or $200,000. 

 

I'll bet that degree does not come with the proverbial brain washing so its highly doubtful that its as valuable to the "System" as far as degrees go. Krugman would be livid I am sure claiming you have to spend MOAR money to make the education system work. /s

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:38 | Link to Comment juangrande
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What! How are you going to get your "live and breathe" favorite collegiate football team from an online U???? Preposterous!!!!

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:03 | Link to Comment GeezerGeek
GeezerGeek's picture

Perhaps all collegiate sports teams (not just football) should be paid for and provided by corporate sponsorship. Rather than simply calling them the Florida State Seminoles, call them the Florida State Disney World Seminoles. It works for NASCAR, right? While some athletes are exceptionally birght, others are, well, less so. Why pretend that they're all student athletes? Besides, why are so-called institutions of higher learning (now teaching at remedial high school levels anyway) paying football coaches more than professors?

 

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:21 | Link to Comment fijisailor
fijisailor's picture

My sister said, "Fuck healthcare.  I'm not paying for it.  I will die instead".  She died last May.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:31 | Link to Comment Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

And that means heathcare would have prevented her death? Medical care is the biggest killer in America. I haven't paid for or used heathcare for 20 years, I'm sixty. I self treat, stay acive and eat well. I might need a doctor sometime, but I can afford to pay for that- here or in another country.

The problem with systems is entropy. This is why government, finance/currency, law, medicine, education and all the rest fail. The system that holds together the best is slavery and Elite power structures- think about that. Perhaps that is the reason for all the "systems".

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:43 | Link to Comment Debt Slave
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Yeah but at least they would have made a few thousand $$ before they killed her.

It isn't hard to understand why they are forcing health insurance on us.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:46 | Link to Comment Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

What, and leave the masses with something to pass on to their children? It is all about zero sum gain. You work your whole life, they feed and entertain you at the lowest level of value and you die with nothing or debt. Slavery 101.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:03 | Link to Comment toady
toady's picture

"Yeah but at least they would have made a few hundred thousand $$ before they killed her."

There, fixed it for you.

Healthcare is the biggest death tax there is. My experience has been that a persons entire net worth, plus an additional write off for the hospital, will go to medical bills if they spend their last few days in a hospital.

My grandma locked herself up in her house and avoided any visitors for her last few months. She left a note saying she did it so she could leave her estate to her sons, not some damn healthcare scumbags.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:54 | Link to Comment fijisailor
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I think she knew that healthcare could not save her.  She wanted to leave something to her sons.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:08 | Link to Comment Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

May she rest in peace Fiji, my condolences.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 15:26 | Link to Comment fijisailor
fijisailor's picture

Thanks for the kind thoughts

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:09 | Link to Comment WillyGroper
WillyGroper's picture

"Death by Injection" - Eustace Mullins

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 14:09 | Link to Comment pupdog1
pupdog1's picture

Hey, I've got the same plan!

"Nature heals and the doctor collects the fee."  --Benjamin Franklin

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 20:49 | Link to Comment RafterManFMJ
RafterManFMJ's picture

She died last May.

Had she used the US 'sickcare' system she likely would have died last January. I am sorry for your loss.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:24 | Link to Comment Mrs. Haggy
Mrs. Haggy's picture

Increased employment in health-care is only part of the problem.  Increased regulation and the amount of unnecessary crap (procedures, exams, supplies) is also out of control.  I work in this sector so I see it first hand.  The full-time employment is up by 80% since 1990, but I would like to see percentage of the total cost of health-care (employment included).  I bet it's a lot higher than 80%.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:22 | Link to Comment Mrs. Haggy
Mrs. Haggy's picture

Increased employment in health-care is only part of the problem.  Increased regulation and the amount of unnecessary crap (procedures, exams, supplies) is also out of control.  I work in this sector so I see it first hand.  The full-time employment is up by 80% since 1990, but I would like to see percentage of the total cost of health-care (employment included).  I bet it's a lot higher than 80%.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:18 | Link to Comment aerojet
aerojet's picture

Me too--the healthcare system has reached a level of peak complexity.  Determining eligbility has practically become an NP-complete problem.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 13:34 | Link to Comment IMACOINNUT
IMACOINNUT's picture

You may look  increased employment as a problem but it may be seen differently as well. Fifteen years ago my patient load was 10 - 11 patients a night in an acute care setting. Now its mandated to be 6 and rarely a 7th, however, the acuity level has skyrocked and the overall health of the typical patient has diminished progressively and abuse has become unbelieveable..

Case in point.. had a patient Friday night in for Etoh abuse with stroke symptoms ---- full workup and cost probably 30K, add in overnight stay and 40K. Patient leaves next day at 11am, returns Saturday night 11pm intoxicated with more symptoms of stroke. Full workup and admission, another 30K +, and the staff has to tend the asshole with freq. stroke checks and pain meds at the patients delight and we fed the fucker til he was content.  So tell me whats broke.....

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 20:53 | Link to Comment RafterManFMJ
RafterManFMJ's picture

First of all what's ewok abuse, and secondly, did he have insurance?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 22:02 | Link to Comment FredFlintstone
FredFlintstone's picture

Insurance or not, we all paid.

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 03:55 | Link to Comment John_Coltrane
John_Coltrane's picture

EtOH = Ethyl Alcohol = Ethanol = C2H5OH.  Pays to stay awake in Chemistry class.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 22:00 | Link to Comment FredFlintstone
FredFlintstone's picture

Why'd he get downvoted? He just told you we paid $70k in one weekend to keep an ahcoholic from dying twice. Leave him in the gutter. Sounds harsh, but shit this is a rwason we are a bankrupt nation.

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 14:30 | Link to Comment Cthonic
Cthonic's picture

You'd be surprised to know how many broke people consider a stay in the hospital (or jail) to be 'vacation'.

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 14:26 | Link to Comment Cthonic
Cthonic's picture

Most people define acuity as "keenness of perception".  My wife's an RN who kept using medical jargon 'high acuity' and 'acuity level' around me.  After hearing about high acuity for over a year, we finally decided to agree that it meant intentionally understaffed and chronically overworked.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:28 | Link to Comment Caracalla
Caracalla's picture

Where's this morning's waterfall in the COMEX market???  I always go short when gold hits 1270 and have done well up to now.  Don't tell me they are going to make me cover this morning.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:28 | Link to Comment ejblues
ejblues's picture

I would just like to compliment the author, Charles Hugh Smith. Another great study/article backed up with the most salient facts with no smoke and mirrors. Brilliant journalism in my opinion.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:34 | Link to Comment Miffed Microbio...
Miffed Microbiologist's picture

Thanks Tyler for this. I have been in the healthcare field for nearly thirty years. Yes, there have always been ebbs and flows in our sector. I've been laid off in downturns 2 times. However, today I have NEVER seen such terrible indices. Our budgets are massively over cost projections in the last few years. Many emergency meetings are being held to plan cost containment. Full time hiring is frozen. Other hospitals in our region are announcing planned layoffs. Management is reorganizing over and over. I feel like I'm living with a crowd of penguins on an iceberg shuffling around trying not to fall off. Unfortunately we don't see Titanic approaching on the horizon.

Miffed;-)

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:41 | Link to Comment Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

Hey Miffed,

How are your classes going? 

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:59 | Link to Comment Miffed Microbio...
Miffed Microbiologist's picture

Absolutely LOVE it!! I missed my calling. I can't wait to learn more. This is true foundational healing and I'm finally around true healers who are like minded. Funny thing, they welcome me with open arms.Walking into the lab now seems so sadly pointless.

Miffed;-)

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:10 | Link to Comment Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

Glad to hear it. I think it does change your whole attitude about healing and the process. There is a place for both, perhaps you can use one to enhance the other? Best regards.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 20:55 | Link to Comment RafterManFMJ
RafterManFMJ's picture

This is true foundational healing and I'm finally around true healers who are like minded

Explain, please.

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 13:25 | Link to Comment Miffed Microbio...
Miffed Microbiologist's picture

Dear FMj

This is really requires a lengthy explanation. The short version is the herbalists I've been training with look at the whole person rather than focusing only on the disease. They use highly concentrated herbs in pharmacological strength. Many of these herbs are originally the basis for drugs used today but they have been refined to one compound and used at such high doses they can be extremely toxic. They use the entire herb so the cofactors that provide synergy are still present. Plus big pharm can patent a drug but not the herb. I have seen just in the few months I've been studying incredible results. I've used them on myself with good success.

I'm in no way advocating dumping modern medicine. Hell, if I'm in a car accident I'm not going to demand herbs to fix me. I'm saying they should be used in conjunction with allopathic medicine. But big Pharm and the AMA don't like someone horning in on their gig. They suppress it under the guise it's snake oil. I have always believed this. But what I've seen now I've come to see the true reason.

If you want more concrete examples I'd be happy to provide them.

Miffed;-)

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:48 | Link to Comment ArkansasAngie
ArkansasAngie's picture

Our local hospital has announced similar measures.

Jurassic park chaos anybody?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:54 | Link to Comment LawsofPhysics
LawsofPhysics's picture

Thermodynamics and the laws of physics are a bitch.  Population growth is following an exponential equation.  There are 7+ billion (and growing) all competing for a better standard of living.  That standard of living requires substantial consumable energy and resources simply to maintain, let along grow. 

The writing is on the wall folks, hedge accordingly.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:09 | Link to Comment GeezerGeek
GeezerGeek's picture

One of the things I like about the laws of physics (there are several, which is why I got my degree in it) is that Barry cannot decide he doesn't want to enforce them, nor can he simply make more up on his own.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:20 | Link to Comment aerojet
aerojet's picture

It's not exponential, it is logistic.  There is only an exponential component, then it rounds off at some peak and begins to drop off. 

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 13:53 | Link to Comment TBT or not TBT
TBT or not TBT's picture

The developed world is well under replacement birthrates, so FAIL. Big swaths of the third world have deathbed demographics as well. Sure there are some shitholes out there with 7 births per woman, but that isn't a problem in western countries. Quite the contrary. In other news, the 1970's called and wants its peculiar brand of Malthusianism back.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 14:49 | Link to Comment LawsofPhysics
LawsofPhysics's picture

Keep believing that progressive lie shill.  Troll harder, this is not the 70's.  Let me guess, you probably think interest rates can rise (like they did in the 70's)?  FAIL.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 16:50 | Link to Comment MEAN BUSINESS
MEAN BUSINESS's picture

Gapminder statistician Hans Rosling on population growth, 2012

When discussing energy and resources for the future, plan on 10B people. THE question is how to achieve a decent standard of living for 10B AND, at a minimum, hold CO2 to 450ppm. The writing on the wall will be in the three remaining IPCC Assessment Report (AR) 5 Working Groups (WGs) set to publish this year.

Paris 2015.

Tick Tick Tick

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 04:07 | Link to Comment John_Coltrane
John_Coltrane's picture

What's so magic about 450 ppm?  I hope you understand that the first 20 ppm of CO2 added to the atmosphere causes 90% of the earth emission reabsorption effect and T raise.  Its called the Beer-Lambert law of radiation absorbance.  The atmosphere acheived nearly maximum absorbance of emitted radiation by CO2 at pre-industrial levels of 200 ppm.  Its like coloring a completely black surface with more black paint and expecting it to get darker.    To believe it will get darker requires faith and religion.  In your case, the religion of AGW.  Like the earth centered universe the notion that humans can alter and control the climate is the height of egotism.  One good episode of volcanism (see Kracatoa eruption) should convince anyone we're not in charge of either light absorbance or surface termperture.

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 04:30 | Link to Comment akak
akak's picture

Well, Venus' atmospheric CO2 content managed to rise well above 450 ppm (950,000 ppm, to be exact), and it seems that it also managed to concurrently (and just coincidentally?) reach IR absorption levels well above those of 200 ppm ---- rather well above, in fact, as its atmospheric temperature is approximately 700 F degrees warmer than can be accounted for solely by its closer proximity to the sun.

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 12:56 | Link to Comment Cthonic
Cthonic's picture

venus has no magnetic field, is closer to the sun, has an atmosphere that is 90 times denser than earth's and is composed of 95% carbon dioxide.  wtf akak, surely you aren't trying to do some sort of linear extrapolation!?

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 13:09 | Link to Comment akak
akak's picture

1) A planetary magnetic field has very little if any meaningful impact on lower atmostpheric temperatures;

2) Yes, I already acknowledged that Venus is closer to the sun, but that factor alone can hardly account for its radically high atmospheric temperature; planetary scientists have calculated that if the earth were moved into Venus' orbit, the rise in temperature due solely to the the increased solar influx would only be on the order of 30 degrees F.;

3) Atmospheric density, in and of itself, should have relatively little influence on average planetwide temperatures ---- that is, unless one or more of the gasses comprising that atmosphere promote a significant greenhouse effect, most particularly if there is a direct relationship between the percentage of that gas, or those gasses, comprising the atmosphere and overall temperature, which is the pertinent point that I was trying to make regarding Venus' abnormally high surface temperature;

4) That kind of makes my point once again, does it not?

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 13:20 | Link to Comment Cthonic
Cthonic's picture

Yes, you pointed out point 4.  I'm not going to bother arguing about points 1 or 2.

I disagree completely with your conjecture in point 3.  Let's focus on that.

"Atmospheric density, in and of itself, should have relatively little influence on average planetwide temperatures... "

 

Check out the denominator of the equation for thermal diffusivity:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_diffusivity

 

Wed, 02/12/2014 - 15:17 | Link to Comment MEAN BUSINESS
MEAN BUSINESS's picture

Thanks for the Beer John_Coltrane. The Beer-Lambert Law and how it plays in climate is hotly debated from what I see. Groovy. Meanwhile, with yoy co2 emissions continuing to rise there is little chance the economy will be de-carbonized before we hit 450ppm CO2, a level not experienced by humans or pre-humans going back a really long long time, right? By having 450 as the magic number and hoping T won't exceed +2C, I think the non-magical # is that it's a shorter trip back to 350 (and beyond) than say 500ppm or 550. Ya know just in case SHTF at 450 and we still have a hope in HELL of doing anything about it.

 

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:37 | Link to Comment OC Sure
OC Sure's picture

Strip away obscuring narratives, please.

The article argues against the effect and not the cause.

Wrestling tenacles will not do.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:40 | Link to Comment SmallerGovNow2
SmallerGovNow2's picture

CHS, you nailed it again Sir...

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:00 | Link to Comment fijisailor
fijisailor's picture

In Bolivia there are people dressed up as doctors going house to house on a flu vaccine campaign.  They give you your flu vaccine, you fall asleep and they rob your house.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:34 | Link to Comment cro_maat
cro_maat's picture

How is that different than what doctors do in the U.S. ?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:43 | Link to Comment Emergency Ward
Emergency Ward's picture

They don't make house calls in the US.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:12 | Link to Comment GeezerGeek
GeezerGeek's picture

I remember when they did. I also remember the beatles coming to the US, and was reminded last week that it's now been 50 years since they came. This stuff keeps up, I'm going to start feeling old.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 10:58 | Link to Comment Rockfish
Rockfish's picture

Make work.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:16 | Link to Comment rsnoble
rsnoble's picture

"As for healthcare in the U.S.: despite soaring employment and expenditures"

 

Do what!  The expenditures part is correct anyway.

Fuck the traditional hospital.  We need more health shops set up the way a vet clinic or dentist office is ran.  No more $10,000 hangnail surgeries.

The bullshit these motherfuckers get away with is insane.  I was in the hospital one time for about 2 months.  I had on average 3 doctor visits daily that at most amounted to 'how are you today'.  On the bill these vists cost anywhere from $300 to $700 each.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:24 | Link to Comment aerojet
aerojet's picture

Dentists, really?  Dentists have always been toeing the ethical line and many are rip-off artists.  How about chiropractors?  Might as well go total quack medicine!

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:17 | Link to Comment Spastica Rex
Spastica Rex's picture

"American higher education is characterized by limited or no learning for a large proportion of students."

I thought higher education's purpose was to deliver a federally insured debt stream to banks and universities.

Am I missing something?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:40 | Link to Comment cro_maat
cro_maat's picture

Yes, you forgot:

- Provide a safe environment for sons and daughters to have lots of sex.

- Introduce students to the wonderful world of illicit drugs that only the CIA can deliver

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:23 | Link to Comment aerojet
aerojet's picture

Not sure how safe any of it was...

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 21:29 | Link to Comment RafterManFMJ
RafterManFMJ's picture

The funny is I've talked to a few women who actually admitted, in so many words, that they were sending their daughter off to skool so they could marry well, meet a husband who would have a good job.

Swell, get married, wife decides to play homemaker and then saddles Hubby with her 100K in debt. Nice.

I suggested in both cases, why not get the daughter a job as a barista at the campus Starbucks and save 150K in debt and interest...

...blank, vacant stares.

Used to be you wanted to get your daughter married off you grub staked the husband with some land, maybe 20 head of cattle.

Today the cattle display their daughters like meat and endow the rapacious University with a dowry that would pay for a nice starter home.

What a ****ed up world.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:22 | Link to Comment Cymore Duttz
Cymore Duttz's picture

The median income for a college graduate is $47,000.

Didn't we just have an article yesterday that said welfare benefits top out at 60k-ish?

So staying home stoned and breeding pays better than going to college and getting a job.

Only in Obama's America.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:28 | Link to Comment Spastica Rex
Spastica Rex's picture

IIRC, Bush's America was pretty similar. And Clinton's. And don't get me started on Bush I. And my God, do you have any idea what income tax rates were under Reagan?!

American white males - punished mercilessly since 1863

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:20 | Link to Comment GeezerGeek
GeezerGeek's picture

American white males - punished mercilessly since 1863

So are you saying that Lincoln's goal of making descendents of Caucasians and Africans equal was achieved by making everyone a slave?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:33 | Link to Comment Spastica Rex
Spastica Rex's picture

I was being an asshole.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 13:07 | Link to Comment acetinker
acetinker's picture

Rex didn't, but I will.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 14:48 | Link to Comment LawsofPhysics
LawsofPhysics's picture

Funny how it worked out like that.  Conspiracy?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 11:43 | Link to Comment RaceToTheBottom
RaceToTheBottom's picture

America needs a Muppetoctamy

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:02 | Link to Comment DOT
DOT's picture

When it comes to "make work" nothing on this planet beats the MIC.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:18 | Link to Comment aerojet
aerojet's picture

I draw your attention to the credit expansion chart, which got its launch in the mid-1990s and correlates perfectly with the repeal of Glass Steagall.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:22 | Link to Comment Straw Dog
Straw Dog's picture

<rant>
My daughter has just completed a Polictal Science bachelors degree at one of the major universities in the Washington DC metro area. It has been a painful experience. She tells me that over the course of the degree she has learned almost nothing, most classes being vacuous outpourings by incompetents with heavy left wing radical leanings.
As an active Republican, Homeschooled Christian she has been subjected to what can only be called persecution. She disliked the whole experience and complained about it daily. It made her life a misery many times. My wife complained to Admin and Professors on several occasions. She completed her degree with high honors.
To add insult to injury, fees used to be $2500 per semester, but here in MD Governor Martin O'Malley pased the "Dream Act" (whose dream), which provides free university education to the children of illegal aliens (hispanics). As a result grants to in-state students, the legal residents, were reduced to zero, consequently her fees rose to $4500 per semester.
Anecdote: In one of her PolySci classes the professor conducted a staw poll of the students, "What do you believe is the best system of government": Capitalism of Communism.
Result 95% of students voted for Communism - we are doomed!
</rant

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 15:13 | Link to Comment Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

I have a degree in Polysci. You daughter would have been better off taking basket weaving.

Her choices are limited: government/tyranny, law/tyranny through coercion, law enforcement/trained attack dog or graduate work. The reason 95% of the students chose communism is simple, there is zero difference beyween crony capitalism+social entitlements and communism.

I suggest she consider a groundwork in economics and history (specially revisionist)and lose the party philosophy (there is no difference), because everything she has been taught has been filtered to achieve results at odds with her personal philosophy ( if I understand you correctly). This should be acquired through research, not schools.

To enter into their arena, she will have to sacrifice her soul on an alter of totalitarian control. Will she want to do this? Best of luck to an obviously intelligent and well meaning lady.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 14:46 | Link to Comment Urban Redneck
Urban Redneck's picture

Political Science is the the pseudo-science of macro self interest. Even hardcore Marxism advocates the omnipotence of economic self-interest (at the national level). The only alternative I am aware of is the long discredited kumbayah fucktard notion of liberalism (whose only current and historical advocates with any gravitas self (and national self) interests' stood to benefit by others buying into their con job, so even that school for the "special/retard" kids isn't in practical conflict with the various false paradigms of the realists' schools. But if you're stuck in O'Malley's People's Republic of Hell you would be hard pressed any decent professors in any discipline capable of passing on real knowledge or useful skills.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 16:22 | Link to Comment RaceToTheBottom
RaceToTheBottom's picture

Why did you not council her to study something useful?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 18:29 | Link to Comment MagicMoney
MagicMoney's picture

LOL at the last sentence...

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 12:41 | Link to Comment SystemOfaDrown
SystemOfaDrown's picture

But how Universities going too continue recruiting 5-star high school athletes to their programs wiithout outrages tuitions on rest of student body?

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 14:48 | Link to Comment whidbey-2
whidbey-2's picture

If one works in the educational field, the first goal is to obtain the sabatical leave to write something that will lead, eventually to a full professorship.  To hell with the damned students, they do not know anything or they would not be in college paying the tuition, or worse, signing notes necessary to stay. It is a con game on all sides including the public.  My class at Harvard had a number of idiots who frankly just wanted to get it over with and knew less when they graduated than when they arrived - which is some sort of an achievement I guess.  We do have problems, but we must hope in the medical field that things are different.  Probably they are no different. Take care of your self, your doctor may have been uninterested in cardiac care and skipped the classes.

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 21:08 | Link to Comment Mrs. Haggy
Mrs. Haggy's picture

I do believe there is competence in the medical field; many intelligent people trying to do the right thing.  As I see it, there is a huge CYA problem that leads to a maximum waste of resources.  Couple that with a billion rules and regulations that make every health care professional less efficient and you have a system that is unsustainable.  Fat will have to be trimmed somewhere...  

Mon, 02/10/2014 - 19:02 | Link to Comment MagicMoney
MagicMoney's picture

People going to college for a degree. It's the degree they are going for. It's not so much if they actually learn anything that has much utility in the real world. Colleges, and universities know this, it's the degree, not the quality of education, that's why they spend money on gynasiums, pools, exercise rooms, jungle jims, etc. These things don't require academic employees. It's a like a vacation away from home.

Another point is that people think that "ANY" education is good enough to land that top notch job. This is not true. Living in academia disconnects you from the market, or the real world. The market does not operate on the merits of who is more educated in miscellaneous things, they need skills that achieve an ends, ability to find solutions to problems that get in the way of achieving an ends. Government and academia convinced people that education is key. Any education. A lot of kids get educated in Liberal Arts, sociology, political science, etc, these are not highly sought  productive skills. They use generalized statistics to prove it, or macro statistics, problem is those statistics doesn't accurately tell you whether a college education was a the prime reason for higher income. It's a simply a correlation.  Many people been successful without much being attributed to their education. I am sure you probably heard about them. Many sucessful people became rich, yet are college drop outs.

 

Student loans is a heavy burden on people. There is people who can't be successful entrepreneurs, or  invest on their own financial standings, because their student loan burden gets in the way. Too much debt, and there is people who living well into their old age, say 50's or 60's paying student loans. It's pretty ridiculous. You now if it smells like a scam, it probably is. Alternatives is learn job skills another way that don't involve you getting suckered into expensive education. Go a community college rather than a university, it should be cheaper. Go to a trade school, be an apprentice. What has been done to US higher education is short of sad. Yet we have politicians peddling on, we need to increase student loans, get people into more debt.

 

As for healthcare, well Medicare doesn't necessarily reign in costs of healthcare spending. Old people use their medicare like it's free stuff, which in a way it is. Problem with US health care on the insurance side is that insurance doesn't operate like insurance. It operates purely as a cost pooling, we band together our payments, so we can use more healthcare, which naturally leads to higher premiums & more unnecessary usage. Real insurance operates on hedging against future possible outcomes based on probability, and the magnitude of that risk. Sorry to say, drug coverage for people who need them for a lifetime, or pre-existing conditions are not really insurable classes. It's fundamentally not insurance. As I said insurance is about future events, pricing them with probability, and risk, using past histories of prices, and liklihood of events while understanding causation, or cause and effect.  Obamacare does nothing to encourage people to economize thier healthcare spending. Just more of the same, and pray on the youth, and health of young people to pay for expensive healthcare. There could be stringent price controls, but that can also have other unintended consequences like reduced access, or timely access, or less healthcare for example. Nationalized healthcare systems operate on cutting cost with price controls, government bargaining, and increasing wait times. There is a trade offs to take into considerations. 

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