US Organized Labor Humiliated After Volkswagen's Tennessee Workers Vote Against Unionizing

Tyler Durden's picture




 

While US organized labor has been in a state of steady decline for several generations, never had it suffered as crushing a blow as it did last night, when in a 712 to 626 vote, Volkswagen's hourly workers in Chattanooga, TN, rejected joining the United Auto Workers labor union. What makes the defeat even more bitter is that a win would have marked the first time the union has been able to organize a foreign-owned auto plant in a Southern U.S. state, and would have been particularly meaningful, because the vote was set in a right-to-work state in the South, where anti-union sentiment is strong and all past UAW organizing drives at automobile plants have failed. What is most shocking, however, is that the defeat came even though the UAW had the cooperation of Volkswagen management and the aid of Germany's powerful IG Metall union, and yet it still failed to win a majority among the plants 1,550 hourly workers.  As the WSJ notes, "the defeat raises questions about the future of a union that for years has suffered from declining membership and influence, and almost certainly leaves its president, Bob King, who had vowed to organize at least one foreign auto maker by the time he retires in June, with a tarnished legacy."

Frank Fischer, the chairman and CEO of the Volkswagen plant in
Tennessee, left, and Gary Casteel, a regional director for the UAW
hold a press conference at the Chattanooga, Tenn., facility on Feb. 14. AP

"If the union can't win [in Chattanooga], it can't win anywhere," said Steve Silvia, a economics and trade professor at American University who has studied labor unions.

Under an agreement the UAW has with Volkswagen, it now must cease all organizing efforts aimed at the Chattanooga plant for at least a year.

And while the UAW could not blame the company, it still found a scapegoat: "The UAW said that "outside interference" affected the outcome of the vote. "Unfortunately, politically motivated third parties threatened the economic future of this facility and the opportunity for workers to create a successful operating model that that would grow jobs in Tennessee," Gary Casteel, the union official in charge of the VW campaign, said in a statement."

Then again, it's not as if the workers did not know what they had to lose:

The Chattanooga workers had been courted steadily for nearly two years by both the UAW and the IG Metall union, which pushed Volkswagen management to open talks with the UAW and to refrain from trying to dissuade American workers from union representation.

 

Mr. King made forging alliances with overseas unions the centerpiece of his strategy after he was elected in 2010. The union now must come up with a way to halt its decline. It once represented 1.5 million workers, but now has about 400,000, and diminished influence, as a result of years of downsizing, layoffs and cutbacks by the three Detroit auto makers General Motors Co., Ford Motor Co. F +1.06% and Chrysler Group.

So even with the stakes all too clear, the workers themselves voted against union representation: a step which many consider may be the beginning of the end for once all too powerful unions.

"The union needs new members. They have to organize the transplants or they don't have much of a future," said Sean McAlinden, chief economist at the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich.

 

The election was also extraordinary because Volkswagen choose to cooperate closely with the UAW. Volkswagen allowed UAW organizers to campaign inside the factory—a step rarely seen in this or other industries.

 

"This is like an alternate universe where everything is turned upside down," said Cliff Hammond, a labor lawyer at Nemeth Law PC in Detroit, who represents management clients but previously worked at the Service Employees International Union. "Usually, companies fight" union drives, he added.

Or maybe this time even the workers decided to give efficient labor supply and demand a chance? It certainly wouldn't be the first time when workers have realized that there is more downside than upside to joining a labor union:

The union's loss adds to a long list of defeats for organized labor in recent years. States like Wisconsin enacted laws that cut the power of public-employee unions, and other states, including Michigan, home of the UAW, adopted right-to-work laws that allow workers to opt out of union membership if they choose.

Than again, instead of political influence, the primary reason for the huge disappointment was the union's own internal strife and political bickering as it seeks to remain relevant in a divided world in which labor representation is increasingly equated to political affiliation.

More workers were persuaded to vote against the union by the UAW's past of bitter battles with management, costly labor contracts and complex work rules. "If the union comes in, we'll have a divided work force," said Cheryl Hawkins, 44, an assembly line worker with three sons. "It will ruin what we have."

 

Other UAW opponents said they dislike the union's support of politicians who back causes like abortion rights and gun control that rub against the conservative bent of Southern states like Tennessee. Still others objected to paying dues to a union from Detroit that is aligned with Volkswagen competitors like GM and Ford.

 

"I just don't trust them," said Danielle Brunner, 23, who has worked at the plant for nearly three years and makes about $20 an hour—about $5 an hour more than new hires at GM, Ford and Chrysler plants.

 

The no-UAW vote raises questions on how the union proceeds now in separate efforts to organize other foreign-owned plants in the South, and whether international cooperation can provide any additional leverage for labor unions.

 

The UAW's alliance with IG Metall was forged over the last several years by Mr. King, who traveled to Germany, Japan, Brazil and South Korea in hopes of getting unions around the world to combine forces.

No matter the long-term future of labor unions, one thing is certain: yesterday's defeat will make the UAW's role and leverage in US manufacturing even weaker, and in turn - lead to some very big question marks about the future of organized labor.

The UAW's loss in Chattanooga also seems likely to complicate contract talks it will have with the Detroit auto makers in 2015. Right now, GM, Ford and Chrysler pay veteran workers about $28 an hour, and new hires about $15 an hour, and the UAW wants to narrow that gap.

 

But without the ability to push wages higher at foreign-owned car plants, the UAW is likely to have little leverage in Detroit, said Kristin Dziczek, director of the Labor & Industry Group at the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich.

 

"They have to organize at least one of the international auto makers in order to attempt to regain bargaining power with the Detroit Three," she added.

The one sure winner from last night's outcome: corporations, who will be delighted to know that they can take advantage of the ongoing US depression and pay appropriate wages in an economy filled with labor (and demand) slack, and instead of spending more on wages, hiring and capital expansion, can continue doing more of the kind of "capital allocation" that has sent the S&P to all time highs: stock buybacks.

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Sat, 02/15/2014 - 11:39 | 4439333 Hopeless for Change
Hopeless for Change's picture

Cue the protests in 5...4...3...2...

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 11:46 | 4439347 Looney
Looney's picture

Awww… So many familiar feces… errr… faces?  ;-)

Looney

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 11:51 | 4439362 onewayticket2
onewayticket2's picture

"in related news, sales of replacement tires are spiking in the area after thousands of customers reported their tires slashed."

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 11:58 | 4439382 Stackers
Stackers's picture

I love my new made in Tennessee TDI Passat. Cant beat 700 miles on a $60 fill up.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 12:15 | 4439413 boogerbently
boogerbently's picture

I wonder if Detroit being a bankrupt, car jobs shipped out of country, desolate wasteland, may have affected their decision?

WalMart employees vote down unions every opportunity they get.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 13:11 | 4439581 Troll Magnet
Troll Magnet's picture

That's what these unions get for backing the left.

Oh yeah. Forget these fuckers. Public employees should be BARRED from unionizing.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 13:46 | 4439677 Payable on Death
Payable on Death's picture

Interesting. How coincidental that I watched On the Waterfront last night. Unions are for pussies.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 14:36 | 4439808 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

Or maybe this time even the workers decided to give efficient labor supply and demand a chance? 

Lol weekend Tyler is in from his day job at fox news. 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/25/Union_membership_in_u...

 

Yep, it's really worked beautifully, wages / employment have gone through the roof!

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 17:19 | 4440295 DOT
DOT's picture

Stop being a tool, James, the Capitol vs. Labor dichotomy is false. Both are organized to achieve a result for a defined constituency. Red team vs. Blue team, Republican vs. Democrat- it's all too convenient don't you think? Unions are people, Corporations are people, and don't forget We the People, there is much more in common to our interests than you allow. You have bitched mightily for far too long. Show us the glorious future that you envision and, of course, the ways and means to get there.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:04 | 4440424 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

Stop being a tool, James, the Capitol vs. Labor dichotomy is false. Both are organized to achieve a result for a defined constituency. 

Yeah except the capital (executive class) side of the equation has all the money, all the media organizations, bought all the politicians..to predictable results. 

Different countries approach the capital / labour equation differently. Destroying unions in the US has not benefitted the majority, yet the propaganda (blue & red team) has long argued for less labour protections. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_hiEvTNV5k

^Clintons propagandist effectively arguing against labour protections.

You have bitched mightily for far too long. Show us the glorious future that you envision and, of course, the ways and means to get there.

I bitch about it because it's the same shit that was being debated 2 decades ago, when the fuck are people going to wake up?? It's not even about solutions, it's about correctly diagnosing the problem. People can sort out the solutions on their own. 

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:24 | 4440464 DOT
DOT's picture

"Yeah except the capital (executive class) side of the equation has all the money, all the media organizations, bought all the politicians..to predictable results.'

 

They don't have you and they don't have me. Now I can't agree that " ALL" is the appropriate quantifier, I will, however, agree that all of the corrupt organizations are very aware of who is paying for the caviar. And they know very well what is really being paid for.

 


Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:48 | 4440504 mjcOH1
mjcOH1's picture

If the VW workers would like to unionize and 'demand' wage increases regardless of labor market conditions, there are plenty of other potential workers in other states who'd be happy to perform the same unskilled work they're performing at their current wage.

Congratulations to them for figuring that out.   To the union organizers who don't get their cut before their victims become unemployed.....boo hoo.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 19:14 | 4440580 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

there are plenty of other potential workers in other states who'd be happy to perform the same unskilled work they're performing at their current wage

That's the good thing about 'unskilled' labour, there are plenty of folks in other countries happy to perform the same work at pennies on the dollar. The good news is with a little luck soon you'll be gainfully employeed at $.10 an hr too! Will be wonderful for corporate profits. 

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 22:13 | 4441045 Vooter
Vooter's picture

LOL...so true. These morons actually think you're supposed get paid more if you're an American...

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 02:09 | 4441531 CheapBastard
CheapBastard's picture

Globalization. It'll gain moar momentum with time.

 

 

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 12:45 | 4442156 RKDS
RKDS's picture

Unskilled?  Most of the people who go on about "unskilled" labor are probably thieves.  I doubt more than a tiny fraction of them could perform the "unskilled" labor that they're so fond of ridiculing.

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 15:07 | 4442509 Pizza man
Pizza man's picture

Your not figuring in productivity. Those cats earning 10 bucks a day are not as productive as 1st world workers. Blame overtaxation and regulation for pushing jobs overseas, not wages. At 100 bucks/bbl..transport costs are very real. There are huge advantages to mfg here if we didn't tax and regulate way beyond necessary. German study. America ranks 94th in corporate tax. Competitive? Don't believe so.

You want higher wages for the poor/unskilled? Stop killing investment/demand (again taxes and regs) and stop increasing supply by importing millions more poor/unskilled (illegal) laborers.

It's not a very complicated issue people. 

Unions stopped being about "fairness" 40 years ago. Now, they simply misprice labor. Ditto the increases in minimum wages. In the end, both practices hurt workers.

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 00:34 | 4441351 Chuck Walla
Chuck Walla's picture

Yep, it's really worked beautifully, wages / employment have gone through the roof!

Yep, them fuckin' Progressives have really delivered. Delivered to themselves, the union brothers, not so much...

 

FORWARD SOVIET!

 

(Former UAW local 865)

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 10:27 | 4441904 Agstacker
Agstacker's picture

You know, James Cole gets shot at the end of the movie.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MMRqVyAak4

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 13:53 | 4439700 Anusocracy
Anusocracy's picture

Unions are the corporations of the left, corporations are the unions of the right.

Both are legal creations of government and both exist to benefit a specific group at the expense of others.

And, of course, government benefits from the existence of both.

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 00:32 | 4441356 Chuck Walla
Chuck Walla's picture

Dear Anus:

 

Brilliantly stated. + 1,000

 

FORWARD UNION ASS NAPKINS!

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 14:06 | 4439732 devnickle
devnickle's picture

+1,000!

 

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 20:02 | 4440709 mumbo_jumbo
mumbo_jumbo's picture

"WalMart employees vote down unions every opportunity they get"

 

and why not? the US taxpayer picks up the difference between what they get paid and what it costs to live......what's really funny is the union of lobbyist that descend on Washington to make sure that NEVER FUCKING CHANGES!!

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 12:49 | 4439501 Black-Man
Black-Man's picture

I had a made in Mexico Jetta which was a piece of junk. Cabin trim fell off, both driver and passenger side windows broke, and I ended up trading it at 80k because I didn't feel the car could get to 100k. 

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 13:52 | 4439695 Jlasoon
Jlasoon's picture

Sure you can, $30 fill up Honda Civic Hybrid Avg. 51mpg x 10 gal. tank = over 1000 miles on $60 reg unleaded fuel. 

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:54 | 4440530 FredFlintstone
FredFlintstone's picture

How do fit in a freaking Passat?

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 12:00 | 4439384 derek_vineyard
derek_vineyard's picture

O is being recruited by the UAW for his after-president gig...or did O do an internship there?  either way

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:50 | 4440513 mjcOH1
mjcOH1's picture

"O is being recruited by the UAW for his after-president gig"

Fluffer?

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 14:01 | 4439719 Bangin7GramRocks
Bangin7GramRocks's picture

Hooray! Now the automakers can pay the workers $8 per hour. God Bless America! But somehow these same companies pay $30 per hour in Germany and Japan AND make a profit. Idiotic Ideology.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 14:42 | 4439826 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

Germany hasn't learned about the amazing job creation / wage benefits found in letting 'the market' decide. Every gawddam thing there is labour protected! Naturally their wages are terrible, products are junk and unemployment through the roof. Er..

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 16:02 | 4440085 Tortfeasor
Tortfeasor's picture

Germany doesn't have the UAW. And I'm sure everyone in Germany is better off because of it.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 16:13 | 4440108 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

Germany doesn't have the UAW. And I'm sure everyone in Germany is better off because of it.

 

Um maybe you missed the bit where it mentioned Germanys primary auto union (IG Metall) was working with UAW?

 

No need to be braindead bitchez, learn something:

 

http://www.remappingdebate.org/article/tale-two-systems

 

In 2010, over 5.5 million cars were produced in Germany, twice the 2.7 million built in the United States. Average compensation (a figure including wages and employer-paid benefits) for autoworkers in Germany was 48.97 Euros per hour ($67.14 US), while compensation for auto work in the United States averaged $33.77 per hour

 

Workers in the German auto industry maintain high wages and good working conditions through two overlapping sets of institutions. First, in the auto industry, virtually all workers are unionized members of IG Metall, the German autoworkers’ union. With such union density, workers have considerable power to keep wages high.

 

According to Mund, however, “The accusation that American unions are more radical and destructive…definitely has to do with the hostile environment in which the unions have to act. How can they be constructive and friendly if their asses are kicked all the time?” Maibach told a very similar story: unlike in Germany, where unionization and high wages are normalized by law and custom, “the U.S. has a different tradition” and “companies have a choice to make” about where to locate their facilities, often deciding on places where the risk of unionization is lower.

 

When asked why German firms operate so differently with respect to labor in different countries, Claude Barfield, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute where he studies international trade and globalization, told Remapping Debate that they do so, in part, “because they can get away with it so far.”

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 22:23 | 4441071 Jeff Cosford
Jeff Cosford's picture

I haven't checked in awhile but a few years ago I got curious about unions and Germany. Turns out that the average unemployment rate there from at least the 70's is 10%. Heh.

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 00:41 | 4441369 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

I haven't checked in awhile but a few years ago I got curious about unions and Germany. Turns out that the average unemployment rate there from at least the 70's is 10%. Heh.

Uh no.

http://intereconomics.eu/downloads/ausgaben/IE_2012/ie1205/schettkat-fig...

http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/chapter...

Germany also had this little thing in the 1990s where they absorbed a place called "East Germany" which was very much stuck in the 1950s and filled with people who weren't exactly A+ job  candidates.. 

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 15:27 | 4439968 Offthebeach
Offthebeach's picture

UAW, Inc. membership has crashed and they are desperate to get new ponzi cash flow to pay off pension guarantee (who knew union leadership overhead would be so high, and investing with felonious friends so disapponting?)

Anyway VW workers are getting $20/hr, full bens, low tax state.

Meanwhile the UAW sold out new, young workers in existing big three plants for $15 and poor benifits. No wonder VW management wanted the union to come in and strong arm the workers. Union leadership's gets new cash flow, management lower enforced costs, workers the shaft.

They will be back. Too much money in workers hands. In a way it is like the country. The union leadership is like the Democrat leadership. The Management is like the GOP, and the workers are like the small, middle and professional classes. The wealth to be divided up.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 16:02 | 4440069 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

Anyway VW workers are getting $20/hr, full bens, low tax state.

Yeesh the bar is set low.. $20/hr? What's that adjusted for inflation versus $20/hr doing the same job twenty years ago?

Meanwhile the UAW sold out new, young workers in existing big three plants for $15 and poor benifits. No wonder VW management wanted the union to come in and strong arm the workers. Union leadership's gets new cash flow, management lower enforced costs, workers the shaft.

This reminds me when I was in my teens working at a grocery store, management was organizing with a consortium of other grocery chains to break the union, union basically controlled all the labour. Used the same sort of arguments brought up here, greedy union / bad for workers / bad for employment / we'll pay you more anyway. 

At the time I was friends with a guy who'd been there long time, was earning the top hr wage ($30). One day he said to me 'See all these people here? They don't know it yet, but they're all fucked.' He ended up taking a buyout.

Anyway, management won and the union was basically decimated in time. Now a decade and a half later almost none of the grocery chains have any union representation, wages hover around minimum and the people I had worked with.. well God knows what happened to them. 

Unions have their own agenda and everyone is subject to greed, but sort of the last line of defence against having your wage taken converted into this:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/34/US_Corporate_Profits_...

Or this:

http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/files/2012/01/fig6.png

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 17:55 | 4440399 jwoop66
jwoop66's picture

I worked in a grocery store (waldbaums) in NY when I was in high school.  I was in the union; had to be, I think.  The pay was ok for a high school student, but not many of us planned on working there as adults - it didn't pay enough.   Its mostly a job for unskilled kids/students etc.   

The union didn't do shit for anyone except take part of our pay, and add a level of burocracy(sp?) to our lives that otherwise would not have existed.   Unions are nothing but a shakedown rackett in a business like that.    The best possible thing for anyone CHOOSING to look for work in that type of industry; or any unskilled labor, is to let the market set the wages.  

You can mock if you want, but in another coversation you would probably tell me about all those jobs out there that Americans wont do!   (even though those industries are predominantly staffed by American workers)

The market has a knack- is the best possible way -  for deciding what an appropriate wage should be.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:35 | 4440479 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

The best possible thing for anyone CHOOSING to look for work in that type of industry; or any unskilled labor, is to let the market set the wages.  

What do you mean 'choose,' like you 'choose' to eat? A jobs based economy means if you want to get by you'll need a job. Or are you suggesting folks go on the .gov dole until they find a job they like? 

The market has a knack- is the best possible way -  for deciding what an appropriate wage should be.

In a world of magical thinking, but not in the real world. It's absurd to suggest that a global supply will set appropriate local labour unit costs for goods sold on an open market. Or that a capital based system would compensate those without access to capital in a equitable manner without strong 'incentives', see: third world countries. 

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:48 | 4440509 TheMeatTrapper
TheMeatTrapper's picture

Funny thing about a union we do have here in Alabama. Walter Energy is a coal mining company. They are, of course, unionized. 

Let's see, the miners have completely separate bathrooms and locker rooms. Suits can't take a piss in the union bathrooms and the miners can't piss in the suits bathrooms. 

Thank God for the hard stance of the unions; otherwise everyone could piss in the same bathrooms. 

Two elections ago the Union backed Obama. Every truck in the damn parking lot had an Obama bumper sticker on it. Alabama rednecks had Obama stickers and UMW stickers plastered all over the trucks - cause they had to. 

Obama won and declared war on them. Their stock (WLT) went from over a hundred bucks a share to about 10. 

Second time around there weren't so many Obama stickers in the parking lot. 

Dumb fuckers in the mines have it a lot worse off than the guys in the Volkswagen plant - but the guys in the mine have a union. 

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:54 | 4440528 mjcOH1
mjcOH1's picture

"Two elections ago the Union backed Obama. Every truck in the damn parking lot had an Obama bumper sticker on it. Alabama rednecks had Obama stickers and UMW stickers plastered all over the trucks - cause they had to. 

Obama won and declared war on them. Their stock (WLT) went from over a hundred bucks a share to about 10. "

 

Good.   Stupid ought to hurt.   Then there's less of it.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 19:13 | 4440586 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

Funny thing about a union we do have here in Alabama. Walter Energy is a coal mining company. They are, of course, unionized.

You're right, coal mining was a much better industry for workers before unions came in and fucked it all up. 

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 13:05 | 4442204 jwoop66
jwoop66's picture

Yes, choose..  

I had to choose to go to the store to fill an app.  I had to choose to go in an talk to them when they responded to the app.  I had to choose to accept their offer of employment.   I had to choose to show up the first day. 

I had to choose to modify my schedule every day thereafter to accomodate my work schedule, and had to choose to show up and do my damn job.  

I chose ALL of these things freely.

Until I chose to give them notice that I would no longer be making the same choices, because I chose to sever our mutual agreement of my  time and labor for their $. 

 

After that, I chose to go in the Navy.   Now THERE was a whole  bunch of choices.     Not all of 'em good, I might add, but choices nonetheless.

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 14:48 | 4442459 James_Cole
James_Cole's picture

'Choice' isn't anywhere near as clean an issue as lots of people pretend it is. The first obvious thing is you choose among options, if you're wealthy you have lots of options if you are poor you have few. If you are wealthy you have the opportunity to make many bad choices, if you're poor - again few. Pretty basic shit. In caste system (which America really is for most) sure there are choices, but within a narrow range.  

Americans love to desperately cling to the notion that they are so free with so many choices/ opportunities and if that's your fantasy good on you, not going to try and convince people around their delusions. 

Carlin put it pretty well:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yt49DsfKDMc

Ariely also has an interesting take on choice, I posted elsewhere zh:

http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_ariely_asks_are_we_in_control_of_our_own_de...

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 20:09 | 4440723 mumbo_jumbo
mumbo_jumbo's picture

"is to let the market set the wages"

 

and that would be whatever the wage in China is....which means more workers who don't make enough to pay taxes, which then means where does the money come from to have a fireman? a teacher? and police officer?

the magical "market" seems to be the answer for everything BUT INTEREST RATES AND THE VALUE OF MORTGAGE BACKED SECURITIES.

and yet the sheep keep chiming in about the "market" while they get fleeced daily, the brainwashing in this country is truly something to behold!!!

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:39 | 4440487 TheMeatTrapper
TheMeatTrapper's picture

You should lay off the rocks. The union wasn't there before and they made a hell of a lot more than $8 an hour. The workers had a free and fair election and they voted it down. 

Why are you against workers deciding for themselves what they want? 

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 00:54 | 4441399 Oldwood
Oldwood's picture

Because free people are stupid people and therfore need unions and other liberal elites to TELL them what to do. Is it surprising to you that liberals would take exception to free choice?

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 07:43 | 4441736 Lednbrass
Lednbrass's picture

Idiot, they don't pay $8- they pay very good money. $20/hour will get you farther in Tennessee than $30 will in Japan or Germany as the cost of living is dramatically lower. 

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 15:14 | 4442533 Pizza man
Pizza man's picture

Dude,

Germany reformed a number of tax and labor issues a number of years ago. Their corporate tax system is better than ours.Why do corporations ever pay taxes? It's stupid. All the costs are footed by the consumers who buy the product.

 

But German is heading down the tubes with their own nanny state obligations to the growing boomer retiree populations. Will be interesting to see how it plays out there.

Sat, 02/15/2014 - 18:21 | 4440455 ZombieHuntclub
ZombieHuntclub's picture

From sunny Chattanooga, I say FUAW

Sun, 02/16/2014 - 11:57 | 4442076 DblAjent
DblAjent's picture

Power to the People!!! (to fight against union thugs)

oops...is that racist nowadays?

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