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Tim Geithner Admits "Too Big To Fail" Hasn't Gone Anywhere (And That's The Way He Likes It)

Tyler Durden's picture




 

Submitted by Mike Krieger of Liberty Blitzkrieg blog,

But it is now clear that Geithner never believed his own talking points. To him, too-big-to-fail and the so-called moral hazard, or safety net, that it would create can’t really ever be fully taken away. During his lecture to Summers’s class, one student asked a question about “resolution authority,” a provision of the reform laws that is supposed to let the government wind down a complex financial institution without creating a domino effect. The question prompted Geithner onto a tangent about too-big-to-fail. “Does it still exist?” he said. “Yeah, of course it does.” Ending too-big-to-fail was “like Moby-Dick for economists or regulators. It’s not just quixotic, it’s misguided.”

- From The New York Times Magazine article, What Timothy Geithner Really Thinks

Never in a million years did I think I’d ever use an article by Andrew Ross Sorkin as the basis of a blog post, but here we are. While probably entirely unintentional, his article serves to further solidify as accurate the prevailing notion across America that former head of the New York Federal Reserve and Obama’s first Treasury Secretary, Timothy Geithner, is nothing more than an addled, crony, bureaucratic banker cabin boy.

There are so many choice nuggets in this article, all of which make Geithner look worse and worse as you read on. It’s almost as if he is some sort of lab created, android bankster butler sent back to earth from the future in order to ensure Wall Street bonuses never experience a downtick. It’s truly remarkable. Early in the article, we learn a little bit about Timmy’s family history, and how, shocker, it overlaps quite nicely with Obama’s own family history.

The following lines from this day forth should be forever referred to as “the paragraph that launched a thousand conspiracy blogs.” We learn that:

But Geithner and Obama had a somewhat natural rapport. Geithner, like Obama, had an itinerant childhood. His father worked for U.S.A.I.D., and the family lived in India, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Thailand. In the conversation, they discovered that Geithner’s father ran the Ford Foundation’s Asia grant-writing program in the 1980s at the same time that Obama’s mother was at its office in Indonesia. It was a nice coincidence, Geithner says, but it still didn’t make him want the job.

Well yes, quite the coincidence indeed. Also interesting that Geithner’s father worked for U.S. A.I.D., which is the organization recently revealed to have launched the fake Cuban Twitter in an attempt to overthrow the government there. In case you missed that, you can get caught up in my post: Conspiracy Fact – How the U.S. Government Covertly Invented a “Cuban Twitter” to Create Revolution. Meanwhile, Democracy now did an expose titled, Is USAID the New CIA?

While the above is certainly interesting and deserves more research on many fronts from folks far more qualified than me, let’s move on to the meat of the article and Geithner’s unique form of bankster worship. Moving along…

But Geithner’s refusal to condemn the bankers became a recurrent theme during his time at Treasury. According to Bernanke, “I didn’t and Tim didn’t go very far in lambasting individuals in Wall Street, maybe partly because we were more focused on the problem than on the politics.” Others, however, have suggested that Geithner was simply too cozy with Wall Street. He had never worked as a banker himself, but he grew up inside the bubble of elites. (Before going into government, his first job was working for Henry Kissinger at Kissinger Associates.) He was tutored at Treasury by Summers, who later worked for the hedge fund D. E. Shaw & Company, and Rubin, who came up through Goldman Sachs and eventually joined the board of Citigroup, where he has been blamed in some circles for its taking on excessive risky debt that nearly caused the firm to collapse. Each man played a significant role in deregulating the financial industry in the 1990s by supporting the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act, which separated commercial and investment banking; they also pushed to limit future regulation of derivatives.

There you have it. Geithner and Bernanke never saw the bankers and their practices as a problem. Rather, they seemed to believe that Poseidon came out of nowhere and splashed a once in a million year tidal wave upon the system and only trillions in free money to financial criminals could save the world.

Oh, and Geithner’s first job was working for Henry Kissinger. Wow. Quite the pedigree…

What is certain, however, is that for all the malfeasance of the biggest banks, Geithner had a predisposition that Wall Street, even as it was, remained essential to the functioning of the U.S. economy in just about every sector. “I did not view Wall Street as a cabal of idiots or crooks,” he writes in “Stress Test.” “My jobs mostly exposed me to talented senior bankers, and selection bias probably gave me an impression that the U.S. financial sector was more capable and ethical than it really was.” During his first few months in the job, Geithner fought with Summers, who felt that his protégé had become overly solicitous of the banks. Geithner dismissed Summers as espousing “the hedge-fund view.” (“Hedge-fund executives tended to see the banks as dumb, lumbering giants,” Geithner writes.) He disagreed when Summers suggested to Obama that the administration pre-emptively nationalize banks like Citigroup or Bank of America or even to try to embarrass them into changing their compensation structures. “I feared that the tougher we talked about the bonuses, the more we would own them,” Geithner writes, “fueling unrealistic expectations about our ability to eradicate extravagance in the financial industry.”

Geithner is so bad, he actually makes Larry Summers look good.

As such, it has left him open to endless criticism that he was a prisoner of “cognitive regulator capture” by Wall Street or suffered so greatly from “Lehman Syndrome” that he became soft on the industry. Simon Johnson, an economist at M.I.T., has argued that bailouts were necessary but executed in the form of a great giveaway. He has compared Geithner to Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord, the French statesman “who served the Revolution, Napoleon and the restored Bourbons — opportunistic and distrusted, but often useful and a great survivor.” Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts senator and creator of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, has written in her new book, “A Fighting Chance,” that Geithner “believed the government’s most important job was to provide a soft landing for the tender fannies of the banks.” It’s an opinion shared by Neil Barofsky, the former special inspector general of TARP. He told me in an email that Geithner, Bernanke and Paulson “consistently put the interests of the banks over those who were supposed to be helped, like struggling homeowners.” While Barofsky acknowledges that TARP “undoubtedly helped save the system,” he also says, “it was supposed to do so much more.”

 

On some level, though, data cannot settle the argument. During our time together, Geithner spoke about the “collateral beneficiaries” of the bailout, by which he meant the inconvenient fact that certain investors and institutions came out of the crisis better off. And for some, that is direct proof of another counterfactual argument. To believe that the bailout worked, they would argue, you would have to believe that the system itself was worth saving in the first place.

That’s the question very few people are willing to ask, but which is at the root of the whole debate.

But it is now clear that Geithner never believed his own talking points. To him, too-big-to-fail and the so-called moral hazard, or safety net, that it would create can’t really ever be fully taken away. During his lecture to Summers’s class, one student asked a question about “resolution authority,” a provision of the reform laws that is supposed to let the government wind down a complex financial institution without creating a domino effect. The question prompted Geithner onto a tangent about too-big-to-fail. “Does it still exist?” he said. “Yeah, of course it does.” Ending too-big-to-fail was “like Moby-Dick for economists or regulators. It’s not just quixotic, it’s misguided.”

Yep, so “Too Big To Fail” has gone nowhere and society continues to be held hostage by the criminal financial oligarchs more than ever before. How about this chart on how 37 banks became 4 in just 20 years:


 

After much back and forth, Obama eventually appointed his chief of staff, Jack Lew, to the job. Geithner returned to Larchmont as an empty-nester, in the same house he could not sell, where he has spent the last year writing his book, working out of the Council on Foreign Relations and giving speeches for six-figure sums. While he claims he is through with government, he still maintains an intimate relationship with Obama, who was rumored to have recruited him to succeed Bernanke as chairman of the Federal Reserve.

 

Geithner admitted that he struggled over what to do next. He didn’t want to go back into government, and he wasn’t inclined to go into academia, but he worried about the optics of going into finance. “I think the perception problem — first of all it’s very damaging to me as I was trying to do some tough things, and I think it’s kind of very damaging to the country at the moment because it sees this basic loss of faith in government,” he said. “I thought the only thing I could really do about that was to make sure I didn’t go work for a bank or a firm that we’d regulated or that we’d rescued directly.”

 

Last month, Geithner officially began a new job as president of a modestly sized private-equity firm, Warburg Pincus. It may not be investment banking, but it’s possibly finance’s second-most-vilified industry, given how Mitt Romney’s Bain Capital experience played out in the 2012 presidential campaign. It’s very unlikely that Geithner will be using TurboTax anytime in the near future, though; he is likely to make millions if not tens of millions of dollars over the next decade if he stays in the business.

He was hesitant to join a financial firm, but he did it anyway! Didn’t take too long. Meanwhile, I think private equity will be seen as the primary villain in the next crisis, as I pointed out in the post: Leaked Documents Show How Blackstone Fleeces Taxpayers via Public Pension Funds.

I asked if the job meant that he had finally given up socialism, which his more severe detractors had accused him of, and embraced capitalism.

 

“No,” he said, with a laugh. “I wouldn’t claim that yet.”

To Geithner’s credit, he seems incapable of telling a really good lie, so through him at least we see the prevailing mentality of the corrupt sociopaths in charge of this country’s policies.

Moving along to another New York Times article, this one by former U.S. Senator Ted Kaufman, we learn more about the societal destructiveness of not going after bankers. He writes:

After the failures that led to the financial crisis, many taxpayers expected that the government would take a hard stance against those who had committed egregious violations.

 

The department first strayed from the correct path when it began years ago to resort to non-prosecution and deferred prosecution agreements with banks, focusing on enhancing bank compliance programs. Instead, it should have stayed focused on investigating senior managers and holding them accountable for lawbreaking, however difficult the consequences may be.

 

What’s far more troubling, however, is that the recent inspector general’s report and accounts from former department insiders show that the Justice Department never made mortgage origination fraud – much less the financial crisis-related investigations of high-level Wall Street executives – a priority.

 

The department’s Southern District of New York, for instance, chose instead to focus on insider-trading cases. The two task forces that the Obama administration formed (which never had a significant investigative capacity) were more for public show than substantive criminal investigations.

 

And according to the inspector general’s report, the F.B.I. ranked complex financial crimes as “the lowest of the six ranked criminal threats” and ranked mortgage fraud as “the lowest subcategory threat” within that category.

Yep, the F.B.I., good at going after peasants and protecting the oligarchs.

It is true that congressional appropriators substantially shortchanged FERA, providing only a portion of the promised $165 million. But the inspector general’s report also found that the F.B.I. diverted FERA funds to other priorities. The report said that “significant mortgage fraud cases were being closed due to the diversion” of these resources.

 

It’s also concerning that conversations took place between Justice and Treasury officials about whether it was appropriate to proceed criminally against particular banks. Under the department’s guidelines, prosecutors are supposed to consider “collateral consequences.” Again, I consider that to be a false issue, as the focus of the investigations should have been on individual executives, not institutions.

 

But the fact that the Justice Department has failed to even try to adequately hold individual Wall Street bank executives accountable has deeply eroded trust in equal justice under the law.

Just in case you haven’t yet figured out how America works.

 

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Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:33 | 4744986 Yen Cross
Yen Cross's picture

     Another bankster trying to avoid the inevitable >

  Thanks for the junk.  I'll ware/wear it proudly. 

   I'm sure you voted for the appointed commitee that vetted one Timothy Geithner?

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:44 | 4745034 cifo
cifo's picture

Wake me up when he goes to jail.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:51 | 4745047 Yen Cross
Yen Cross's picture

  WWF-XAU.   Will work for- gold.

  A little humor.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:56 | 4745061 Stackers
Stackers's picture

Oligarchy :  is a form of power structure in which power effectively rests with a small number of people. These people could be distinguished by royalty, wealth, family ties, education, corporate, or military control

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:00 | 4745075 remain calm
remain calm's picture

How many nut sacks do you Geitner have habitated his mouth? Too many to count would be my guess.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:01 | 4745081 Yen Cross
Yen Cross's picture

  For a "fat bastard' you're pretty well spoken Stackers.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:10 | 4745105 Fredo Corleone
Fredo Corleone's picture

"...former head of the New York Federal Reserve and Obama’s first Treasury Secretary, Timothy Geithner, is nothing more than an addled, crony, bureaucratic banker cabin boy."

You omitted Goldman fluffer.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 21:20 | 4745391 kliguy38
kliguy38's picture

Douchebag sums it up

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 13:06 | 4746206 Dollarmedes
Dollarmedes's picture

It's a funny thing about Obama's cabinet picks: they are always partisan hacks first and foremost. I already knew that. But it seem as if Obama must be picking them specifically for their incompetence, as well.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:59 | 4745074 Relentless101
Relentless101's picture

Hang him in the streets.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:06 | 4745200 Ignatius
Ignatius's picture

I appreciate the confirmation that the Timothy Geithner is the shit-stain I took him for.

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 08:24 | 4745838 max2205
max2205's picture

Dont worry , it'll get much worse before it gets better

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 11:50 | 4746092 mc225
mc225's picture

--serves to further solidify as accurate the prevailing notion across America that former head of the New York Federal Reserve and Obama’s first Treasury Secretary, Timothy Geithner--

 

how many 'americans' are even aware of this man's existence? 1 in 50?

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:28 | 4744994 RaceToTheBottom
RaceToTheBottom's picture

TBTF bankster chart is excellent

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:30 | 4744997 booboo
booboo's picture

Bevis is so despised they needed to get him out of the publics view. Just looking at him makes you want to round house kick him right in his cocksucker.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:37 | 4745019 Confused
Confused's picture

He was born into this. His family has been around awhile (head of the Ford Foundation during the Reece committee). Just doing his part to keep the new age royalty in power. 

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:54 | 4745044 cowdiddly
cowdiddly's picture

a kiss ass tribe member under Kissinger and, a brand new job with the Warburgs. That's all I need to know-explains everything about this maggot.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:43 | 4745168 Chief Wonder Bread
Chief Wonder Bread's picture

Some people can do no wrong it seems. It's almost like they have been 'anointed'.

'O pointy birds, o pointy pointy, anoint my head, anointy-nointy.'

Moving on, butthead says he couldn't file his tax returns 'cause he was using Turbo-Tax? You have to load the software in first, fuck-twit.

Sun, 05/11/2014 - 11:16 | 4748042 Monty Burns
Monty Burns's picture

I know Timmay ticks all the boxes but in fact he's not a tribe member. I often wondered how he got the job in the light of that...

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:31 | 4745001 kchrisc
kchrisc's picture

NTBFG: "Not too big for the guillotine."

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:32 | 4745004 Seasmoke
Seasmoke's picture

Tick Tock, Tiny Tim, Tick Tock. 

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 02:07 | 4745697 intric8
intric8's picture

the irony here is that tiny tim, all 5'5" of himself, is too big to fail.

Tiny tim will hit the roof if he comes across this piece. It may take him awhile, but he'll hit the roof.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:33 | 4745006 wisefool
wisefool's picture

no snarc. I bought turbotax for this years taxes. Timmay vs. Timmay?

snarc: But should I let it all go, be like jack lew,  and design a "sequester" that would be so painfull that exactly one federal job was eliminated?

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:34 | 4745010 Seasmoke
Seasmoke's picture

Anyone remember his first day in full view of the public. It's a Classic. 

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:35 | 4745014 Bill of Rights
Bill of Rights's picture

I yearn for a flying shoe.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:38 | 4745020 ArkansasAngie
ArkansasAngie's picture

Leave no incumbant in office

 

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:44 | 4745032 the wet spot
the wet spot's picture

We're fucked.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:51 | 4745048 Robinhood
Robinhood's picture

When I was young I worked on farms. This article inspires reflection of working the headgate, or running them down the chute, during young bull castrations. Once locked in the headgate the vet cut off the bottom of their sack, reached up and pulled down one nut at a time and cut and cortorized.  It was always painful as youg man watching and being a part of this process because...well you know. But I would be happy to run Timmay down the chute or slam the gate on his neck. 

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:56 | 4745066 cowdiddly
cowdiddly's picture

wouldn't work, there would be nothing to cut, he's already been emasculated.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:31 | 4745277 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

.

wouldn't work, there would be nothing to cut, he's already been emasculated.

Always a good thing to have a backup plan. For this situation, I'd recommend a red-hot iron to brand his taint with the word "gelding".

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 18:53 | 4745049 Kaiser Sousa
Kaiser Sousa's picture

until we withdraw from their debt based currency paradigm by divesting of debt coupon dollars and accumulating real money  - Physical Gold and Silver nothing will change...

until they r made to pay physically for the crimes they commit on the daily nothing will change...

to have the power to render them irrelevant and to continue not to do so is on the citizenry...

the sociopaths will never change until they r forced to...voting doesnt mean shit...

 

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:14 | 4745235 rum_runner
rum_runner's picture

The little slivers of metal you and I might roost on are of total inconsequence relative to the trillions of dollars sloshing around out there.  We're living a fantasy every bit as far afield as believing humanity will get its act together and aboilsh crime, inequity and fat-assery.  

"until we withdraw from their debt based currency paradigm.."  People can't connect the dots between the garbage they put in their mouths and what they look like.  You want them to comprehend a "debt based currency paradigm"?   And actually, like, do something about it?

Yeah, I still collect my trinkets just as a small hedge and vote of no confidence in the machinations of this well-dressed cabal but in the end if SHTF your gold is going to be worth a lot less than your lead OR the system will reset with a new form of fiat and our Au and Ag will be worth more or less the same.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 21:19 | 4745388 rum_runner
rum_runner's picture

The little slivers of metal you and I might roost on are of total inconsequence relative to the trillions of dollars sloshing around out there.  We're living a fantasy every bit as far afield as believing humanity will get its act together and aboilsh crime, inequity and fat-assery.  

"until we withdraw from their debt based currency paradigm.."  People can't connect the dots between the garbage they put in their mouths and what they look like.  You want them to comprehend a "debt based currency paradigm"?   And actually, like, do something about it?

Yeah, I still collect my trinkets just as a small hedge and vote of no confidence in the machinations of this well-dressed cabal but in the end if SHTF your gold is going to be worth a lot less than your lead OR the system will reset with a new form of fiat and our Au and Ag will be worth more or less the same.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:00 | 4745079 Amish Hacker
Amish Hacker's picture

Why does bankruptcy have to be the end of the world? It's an orderly process, even for a large company, and an integral part of capitalism. What made it unacceptable to Geithner & friends---besides the annihilation of the derivative world--- is that incompetent management would have been replaced. Can't have that. So, instead, now the TBTF banks are bigger than ever, and the same crooks who recklessly gambled away their companies are still sitting in the corner offices.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:19 | 4745125 knukles
knukles's picture

An orderly process...

Of course, unless we move into the post modern era, the New Days of WhooHooStompyNomics, when the government, in "bankruptcies" such as GM treated everybody fair and equitably...  How orderly could it be to be a senior secured debt holder and get fucked before the UAW pension funds, FFS?

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:03 | 4745085 kill switch
kill switch's picture

What the fuck is new about this??? This is infomative???? Tyler let's cut the shit!!!

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:07 | 4745095 ebworthen
ebworthen's picture

"...an addled, crony, bureaucratic banker cabin boy."

That's our boy Turbo Timmy all-right.

There is enough evidence to hang these guys for crimes against the people - for treason, but instead they are celebrities.

Yes, this is how the New Rome works.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:07 | 4745098 Yen Cross
Yen Cross's picture

  Two paragraphs into the article > Elizabeth Warren and Kissinger< in one piece?

  JFC, that's like trying to create an symbiotic relationship between the "Pocahontas" and a GIANT SQUID!

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:19 | 4745127 Pareto
Pareto's picture

Thats what I thought!!

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:36 | 4745157 Fredo Corleone
Fredo Corleone's picture

Squaw Warren ? Make that, "Fauxcohontas."

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:10 | 4745102 CaptainSpaulding
CaptainSpaulding's picture

Heeeee's back

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:15 | 4745114 fxrxexexdxoxmx
fxrxexexdxoxmx's picture

I know that when we start using the gulitines I want little Timmy to be the first.

I volunteer to let the blade fall.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:26 | 4745126 Atomizer
Atomizer's picture

Sell us the dream Sonny, Err Timmy. I digress.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:23 | 4745131 buzzsaw99
buzzsaw99's picture

i marvel at how easy it was. if i didn't know about the looting and pillaging i'd be happy as a clam. i have scores of chinese slave laborers working for me, gasoline is under $4/gal, my retirement accounts are loving it. people in the usa just aren't that mad about it because really things are pretty good. i'm still outraged, but it's pretty funny actually.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:35 | 4745145 Dewey Cheatum Howe
Dewey Cheatum Howe's picture

Last month, Geithner officially began a new job as president of a modestly sized private-equity firm, Warburg Pincus. It may not be investment banking...

 

No it isn't but sure is noteworthy for who owns it. The family that is one of the key founders of the Federal Reserve and a family most certainly sits on the board of directors as a majority shareholder if not outright owners of the FED still as Bernake's former and Yellen's current boss.

Can you say crony misdirection payoff for favorable treatment for their central bank.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:52 | 4745187 Dewey Cheatum Howe
Dewey Cheatum Howe's picture

Some more color from the FED on the Warburg's specifically Paul Warburg and more on how little things change.

http://www.federalreservehistory.org/People/DetailView/84

...

Warburg was born in Hamburg, Germany, in 1868. He graduated from high school in Hamburg in 1886 and began working for an exporting firm there. He then moved on to positions at shipping and banking companies in London and Paris. He returned to Hamburg in 1895 and became a partner in the banking firm M.M. Warburg and Company, founded by his great grandfather.

  Warburg was a partner in the family firm until 1907. However, in 1902, he moved to New York City and joined his father-in-law’s (Loeb) company (Kuhn, Loeb & Co.) as a partner overseeing international loans to several governments. In 1911, he became a naturalized U.S. citizen.   Warburg was considered one of the top authorities on central banking both in Europe and the United States. He was active in the monetary reform movement taking place in the United States in the early 1900s and advocated for the establishment of a U.S. central bank. He and several other bankers helped draft the Aldrich bill of 1910. Although the bill was never brought before Congress, many of its provisions were added to the 1913 Federal Reserve Act, which created the Federal Reserve System. President Woodrow Wilson appointed Warburg to the new entity’s first Board in 1914.   Although Warburg left the Federal Reserve Board in 1918, he continued to serve the Federal Reserve as a member of the Federal Advisory Council (1921–26). He resumed his activities in business and philanthropic circles as well. For example, he founded and was the first chairman of the Executive Committee of the American Acceptance Council in 1919. In 1921, he organized the International Acceptance Bank to promote U.S. government financing of reconstruction in Europe following the war.   Warburg was also a director of the Council on Foreign Relations (1921–32), a trustee of the Institute of Economics (1922–27), and a trustee of the Brookings Institution after it merged with the Institute of Economics in 1927. He also helped establish the Carl Schurz Memorial Foundation in 1930. He served at various times as a director of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Union Pacific Railroad, and Western Union Telegraph Company. Warburg was also a director of the Julliard School of Music and a trustee of Tuskegee College. ...  

 

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 00:14 | 4745621 Treason Season
Treason Season's picture

How about a twofer! While Paul always gets the limelight poor Max is always ignored. But get this. While his brother was running the Fed in America, Max was running the equivalent of the C.I.A. in Germany.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:17 | 4745247 One of We
One of We's picture

Warburg, Rothchild, Satan, what's the fucking difference?

 

None Dare Call it Conspiracy

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 08:20 | 4745836 Milton Waddams
Milton Waddams's picture

While anyone that has ingested amanita muscaria will tell you that the alien fungus provokes a deep connection to the world; you also see the false connections

Sun, 05/11/2014 - 11:26 | 4748070 Monty Burns
Monty Burns's picture

The family that is one of the key founders of the Federal Reserve .... And the family that was one of the paymasters for the Bolshevik takeover of Russia in 1917.  Czar and family duly murdered. Job done.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 19:48 | 4745174 Bangin7GramRocks
Bangin7GramRocks's picture

He needs to be pummeled in the dark while one assailant whispers "what's the frequency Kenneth?"

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:02 | 4745206 kurt
kurt's picture

Here's What!

Remember those '30's Johnny Weismuller Tarzans? There was a couple episodes which featured these blood thirsty tribesmen who would take their victim and tie them between a very springy tree, or two, and suddenly release them. The tree would energetically spring vertical. Being that the victim was tied to a stump or rock, they would be swiftly torn, ripped savagely in half.

Was it seeing Timmy? Is it pent up rage? Why did I think of that when viewing his smirking face?

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:07 | 4745218 Colonel Klink
Colonel Klink's picture

Tim Geithner is a weasle of the lowest order.

Off with his head!

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:13 | 4745233 pupdog1
pupdog1's picture

Weasle lawyers will be in touch shortly.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:34 | 4745285 Colonel Klink
Colonel Klink's picture

Hahaha, weasel defamation.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:11 | 4745227 One of We
One of We's picture

If I never have to see the hobbit turbo timmy's face again unless its right before I run over him in a crosswalk it will be too soon.....

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:11 | 4745230 pupdog1
pupdog1's picture

Eddie Haskell on fucking steroids.

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 00:17 | 4745624 Treason Season
Treason Season's picture

Or trauma training. Or both!

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:14 | 4745236 Bemused Observer
Bemused Observer's picture

So nice that the tea party, through the GOP, had us all focused on important things like Obama's birth certificate while all this was going on...of course it suited the GOP just fine to steer attention away from Geitner and other shit, because BOTH parties at that level are working for the same cause. And it ain't us.

So, we all got to watch this kabuki theater with Orly Taitz and the weird candidates and the bizzare accusations, and little Timmy and his friends were busy busy busy!

Now we can read his book years later to find out how he screwed us while we were all watching the clown show.

 

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:18 | 4745250 nmewn
nmewn's picture

lol...Birtherism was started by supporters of Hitlary.

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 08:21 | 4745822 roadhazard
roadhazard's picture

And it is the right wing that ate it up and looked/looks stupid in the process. Wingers crack me up. And how can they not look like a bunch of dumb asses when there hero's include D. Trump. I love how he uses the right wing dime to promote nothing but himself. Repubicans= bigger suckers even than democraps. What's next, a Bengazi repubican fund raiser... oh wait.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 20:45 | 4745312 MrBoompi
MrBoompi's picture

I think it's probably a good bet that any organization involved in any foreign country, profit or nonprofit, has bee infiltrated by the CIA.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 21:13 | 4745349 samsara
samsara's picture

Warburg-Pincus

So, He now works for Saron Directly.

No,that would be Rockefeller, Make that Morgoth(Melkor)

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 21:04 | 4745355 10mm
10mm's picture

Car Jack Victim.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 21:28 | 4745404 shovelhead
shovelhead's picture

Why do CIA employees feel the need to inflict their wastrel children on us?

 

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 22:06 | 4745448 Elliptico
Elliptico's picture

Since when is pointing out crime political?

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 22:31 | 4745487 Ned Zeppelin
Ned Zeppelin's picture

Let's be clear and be done: Bernanke, Geithner and Sorkin are despicable whores. Not worthy of any further mention on ZH or anywhere else.

Thank you.

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 23:12 | 4745542 Radical Marijuana
Radical Marijuana's picture

That chart on previous bank mergers suggests that, if things keep on going the way that they were, then eventually those five big banks will merge into ONE BIG BANK, which together will then hold something like 80% of all assets?

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 23:25 | 4745564 williambanzai7
williambanzai7's picture

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 23:52 | 4745599 Sock Monkey Posse
Sock Monkey Posse's picture

Timmy does have a rather large forehead. That's gotta count for something.

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 00:14 | 4745620 Freewheelin Franklin
Freewheelin Franklin's picture

T-t-t-t-t-----TIMMAHHHHHHHHHHH

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egefdTzUkBM

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 00:53 | 4745655 BeetleBailey
BeetleBailey's picture

FUCK YOU TIM GEITNER YOU PRICK!

 

..all that's need to be said to this drat....

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 02:32 | 4745707 WTFUD
WTFUD's picture

Like Barry, Teaboy Tim is a Class A OPPORTUNIST.
Two head parasites on every freshly laid steaming pile of dog shit.

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 05:17 | 4745759 russwinter
russwinter's picture

Geithner and Obama overlap =  deep state CIA. 

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 06:19 | 4745775 22winmag
22winmag's picture

Geithner isn't half the man Summers is.

 

Summers had the balls to say women belong barefoot in the kitchen.

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 07:56 | 4745819 Milton Waddams
Milton Waddams's picture

From January 1981 to November 1984, Dunham was the program officer for women and employment in the Ford Foundation's Southeast Asia regional office in Jakarta.[41][47] While at the Ford Foundation, she developed a model of microfinance which is now the standard in Indonesia, a country that is a world leader in micro-credit systems.[49] Peter Geithner, father of Tim Geithner (who later became U.S. Secretary of the Treasury in her son's administration), was head of the foundation's Asia grant-making at that time.[50]

 

Aristocracy. Next up to the plate... Killary!

 

Woot Woot

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 08:34 | 4745848 Notsobadwlad
Notsobadwlad's picture

Ummm ... the standard of finance in Indonesia is corruption, but more on a personal level as opposed to a systemic "too big to jail" model.

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 08:32 | 4745845 Notsobadwlad
Notsobadwlad's picture

It is not so much the presence of the demonically possessed that bother me. It is their coordination and apparent desperation. What exactly is it that they fear that they have found such a great need to come out of the shadows and flaunt their psychopathy.

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 09:39 | 4745897 moneybots
moneybots's picture

"How about this chart on how 37 banks became 4 in just 20 years"

A new age of monopoly.

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 09:47 | 4745904 Freewheelin Franklin
Freewheelin Franklin's picture

TBTF? Too Big To Fap? 

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 11:53 | 4746097 boozo
boozo's picture

Timothy, you had the opportunity, intelligence, training and network to enhacne life on earth for all ethnicities, which was the mandat that the Name assigned to your people. You, however, have abused the nations, empoverished the weak, and lied to the Name. You have been weighed in the balance and been found wanting.

Sun, 05/11/2014 - 09:37 | 4747886 AdvancingTime
AdvancingTime's picture

The line, "Geithner is so bad, he actually makes Larry Summers look good" Is spot on.

How did we ever fall to such a state that we would allow  a tax cheat to rise to the highest levels of Government when they should be in jail?

Please note, I know the answer, but it still shocks me whenever I ponder the subject.

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