Merkel Slams Obama's "Cold War" Espionage "Doesn't Belong In 21st Century"

Tyler Durden's picture

On the heels of John Kerry's accusation that Russia's behavior does not belong in the 21st century, Germany's Angela Merkel has come out swining against the escalating spying scandal with the US (which saw allegations that the US had recruited two Germans to sell secrets this week). During an interview with ZDF, the German leader blasted “that we have different perceptions on the work of intelligence services," adding that "we don’t live in the Cold War anymore." The White House's response, so far, a shrug of 'business-as-usual' from Josh Earnest; which fits with Merkel's conclusion: "I think it's not that easy to convince the Americans ... to completely change the way their intelligence services work."

As AP reports,

German Chancellor Angela Merkel is doubtful the U.S. will stop spying on Germany.

 

The chancellor said in an interview with public broadcaster ZDF "I think it's not that easy to convince the Americans ... to completely change the way their intelligence services work."

 

Germany on Thursday demanded Washington's top spy in Berlin leave the country as a new round of allegations of U.S. espionage worsened the friction between the two allies.

 

That move followed reports that U.S. intelligence had recruited two Germans — a man who worked at the country's foreign intelligence agency and a defense ministry employee.

 

Asked whether she expected the Americans to change their behavior when it comes to spying on Germany, Merkel said "I can't predict that, but certainly hope it will change."

Topped off by her slamming Obama's approach...

The past week’s clash over espionage shows “that we have different perceptions on the work of intelligence services,” Merkel says. “We don’t live in the Cold War anymore.”

 

Merkel says "methods of the past" don't belong to 21st century

The US does not seem to care too much... (as The Hill reports)

On Friday, White House press secretary Josh Earnest appeared to indicate the U.S. believed the alleged spying between the allies was par for the course in comments to reporters.

 

“Allies with sophisticated intelligence agencies like the United States and Germany understand with some degree of detail exactly what those intelligence relationships and activities entail,” Earnest said.

 

Any differences that we have are most effectively resolved through established private channels, not through the media. These private channels include regular discussions between intelligence officials, diplomatic officials, and national security officials from those two countries. So pursuing that dialogue through those channels is exactly what we’re doing.”

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