This page has been archived and commenting is disabled.

German Handelsblatt Releases Stunning Anti-West Op-Ed, Asks If "West Rabble-Rousers Are On The Payroll Of The KGB"

Tyler Durden's picture




 

Up until this point Angela Merkel, and German media in general, had been staunchly on the side of the west when it comes to dealing with Russia, Putin and realpolitik in broader terms. That changed dramatically today when Gabor Steingart, the chief editor of Handelsblatt, Germany's leading economic newspaper, came out with a stunning op-ed, in German, English and Russian, titled simply that "The West on the wrong path" in which the editor comes out very vocally against the autopilot mode German media has been on for the past several months and calls for an end to a strategy of sanctions and Russian confrontation that ultimately "harms German interests" and is a dead end.

Some of the "must read" excerpts:

  • The politics of escalation does not have a realistic goal – and harms German interests.
  • Newspapers we thought to be all about thoughts and ideas now march in lock-step with politicians in their calls for sanctions against Russia's President Putin. Even the headlines betray an aggressive tension as is usually characteristic of hooligans when they 'support' their respective teams. The Tagesspiegel: “Enough talk!“ The FAZ: “Show strength“. The Süddeutsche Zeitung: “Now or never.“ The Spiegel calls for an “End to cowardice“: “Putin's web of lies, propaganda, and deception has been exposed. The wreckage of MH 17 is also the result of a crashed diplomacy.“
  • Our purpose is to wipe off some of the foam that has formed on the debating mouths, to steal words from the mouths of both the rabble-rousers and the roused, and put new words there instead. One word that has become disused of late is this: realism.
  • Germany has waged war against its eastern neighbor twice in the past 100 years. The German soul, which we generally claim to be on the romantic side, showed its cruel side.
  • The politics of escalation show that Europe sorely misses a realistic goal. It's a different thing in the US. Threats and posturing are simply part of the election preparations. When Hillary Clinton compares Putin with Hitler, she does so only to appeal to the Republican vote, i.e. people who do not own a passport. For many of them, Hitler is the only foreigner they know, which is why Adolf Putin is a very welcome fictitious campaign effigy. In this respect, Clinton and Obama have a realistic goal: to appeal to the people, to win elections, to win another Democratic presidency.
  • Even the idea that economic pressure and political isolation would bring Russia to its knees was not really thought all the way through. Even if we could succeed: what good would Russia be on its knees? How can you want to live together in the European house with a humiliated people whose elected leadership is treated like a pariah and whose citizens you might have to support in the coming winter.
  • It is not too late for the duo Merkel/Steinmeier to use the concepts and ideas of this time. It does not make sense to just follow the strategically idea-less Obama. Everyone can see how he and Putin are driving like in a dream directly towards a sign which reads: Dead End.
  • Demonizing Putin is not a policy. It is an alibi for the lack thereof. He advises condensing conflicts, i.e. to make them smaller, shrink them, and then distill them into a solution. At the moment (and for a long time before that) America is doing the opposite. All conflicts are escalated. The attack of a terror group named Al Qaida is turned into a global campaign against Islam. Iraq is bombed using dubious justifications. Then the US Air Force flies on to Afghanistan and Pakistan. The relationship to the Islamic world can safely be considered damaged.
  • The American tendency to verbal and then also military escalation, the isolation, demonization, and attacking of enemies has not proven effective. The last successful major military action the US conducted was the Normandy landing. Everything else – Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan – was a clear failure.

Punchline #1:

  • Collective movements start in support of the sanctioned, as is the case today in Russia. The country was hardly ever more unified behind their president than now. This could almost lead you to think that the rabble-rousers of the West are on the payroll of the Russian secret service.

And Punchline #2:

  • History does not have to repeat itself. Maybe we can find a shortcut.

Also maybe those looking for the moment in time when Germany finally rotated away from its pro-western mindset and took a long, hard look at the rising Eurasian/BRIC/counter US Dollar axis, should remember this article...

* * *

Full article:

The West on the wrong path

In view of the events in Ukraine, the government and many media have switched from level-headed to agitated. The spectrum of opinions has been narrowed to the width of a sniper scope. The politics of escalation does not have a realistic goal – and harms German interests.

Every war is accompanied by a kind of mental mobilization: war fever. Even smart people are not immune to controlled bouts of this fever. “This war in all its atrociousness is still a great and wonderful thing. It is an experience worth having“ rejoiced Max Weber in 1914 when the lights went out in Europe. Thomas Mann felt a “cleansing, liberation, and a tremendous amount of hope“.

Even when thousands already lay dead on the Belgian battle fields, the war fever did not subside. Exactly 100 years ago, 93 painters, writers, and scientists composed the “Call to the world of culture.“ Max Liebermann, Gerhart Hauptmann, Max Planck, Wilhelm Röntgen, and others encouraged their countrymen to engage in cruelty towards their neighbor: “Without German militarism, German culture would have been swept from the face of the earth a long time ago. The German armed forces and the German people are one. This awareness makes 70 million Germans brothers without prejudice to education, status, or party.“

We interrupt our own train of thought: “History is not repeating itself!” But can we be so sure about that these days? In view of the war events in the Crimean and eastern Ukraine, the heads of states and governments of the West suddenly have no more questions and all the answers. The US Congress is openly discussing arming Ukraine. The former security advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski recommends arming the citizens there for house-to-house and street combat. The German Chancellor, as it is her habit, is much less clear but no less ominous: “We are ready to take severe measures.“

German journalism has switched from level-headed to agitated in a matter of weeks. The spectrum of opinions has been narrowed to the field of vision of a sniper scope.

Newspapers we thought to be all about thoughts and ideas now march in lock-step with politicians in their calls for sanctions against Russia's President Putin. Even the headlines betray an aggressive tension as is usually characteristic of hooligans when they 'support' their respective teams.

The Tagesspiegel: “Enough talk!“ The FAZ: “Show strength“. The Süddeutsche Zeitung: “Now or never.“ The Spiegel calls for an “End to cowardice“: “Putin's web of lies, propaganda, and deception has been exposed. The wreckage of MH 17 is also the result of a crashed diplomacy.“

Western politics and German media agree.

Every reflexive string of accusations results in the same outcome: in no time allegations and counter-allegations become so entangled that the facts become almost completely obscured.

Who deceived who first?

Did it all start with the Russian invasion of the Crimean or did the West first promote the destabilization of the Ukraine? Does Russia want to expand into the West or NATO into the East? Or did maybe two world-powers meet at the same door in the middle of the night, driven by very similar intentions towards a defenseless third that now pays for the resulting quagmire with the first phases of a civil war?

If at this point you are still waiting for an answer as to whose fault it is, you might as well just stop reading. You will not miss anything. We are not trying to unearth this hidden truth. We don't know how it started. We don't know how it will end. And we are sitting right here, in the middle of it. At least Peter Sloterdijk has a few words of consolation for us: “To live in the world means to live in uncertainty.“

Our purpose is to wipe off some of the foam that has formed on the debating mouths, to steal words from the mouths of both the rabble-rousers and the roused, and put new words there instead. One word that has become disused of late is this: realism.

The politics of escalation show that Europe sorely misses a realistic goal. It's a different thing in the US. Threats and posturing are simply part of the election preparations. When Hillary Clinton compares Putin with Hitler, she does so only to appeal to the Republican vote, i.e. people who do not own a passport. For many of them, Hitler is the only foreigner they know, which is why Adolf Putin is a very welcome fictitious campaign effigy. In this respect, Clinton and Obama have a realistic goal: to appeal to the people, to win elections, to win another Democratic presidency.

Angela Merkel can hardly claim these mitigating circumstances for herself. Geography forces every German Chancellor to be a bit more serious. As neighbors of Russia, as part of the European community bound in destiny, as recipient of energy and supplier of this and that, we Germans have a clearly more vital interest in stability and communication. We cannot afford to look at Russia through the eyes of the American Tea Party.

Every mistake starts with a mistake in thinking. And we are making this mistake if we believe that only the other party profits from our economic relationship and thus will suffer when this relationship stops. If economic ties were maintained for mutual profit, then severing them will lead to mutual loss. Punishment and self-punishment are the same thing in this case.

Even the idea that economic pressure and political isolation would bring Russia to its knees was not really thought all the way through. Even if we could succeed: what good would Russia be on its knees? How can you want to live together in the European house with a humiliated people whose elected leadership is treated like a pariah and whose citizens you might have to support in the coming winter.

Of course, the current situation requires a strong stance, but more than anything a strong stance against ourselves. Germans have neither wanted nor caused these realities, but they are now our realities. Just consider what Willy Brandt had to listen to when his fate as mayor of Berlin placed him in the shadow of the wall. What sanctions and punishments were suggested to him. But he decided to forgo this festival of outrage. He never turned the screw of retribution.

When he was awarded the Noble Prize for Peace he shed light on what went on around him in the hectic days when the wall was built: “There is still another aspect – that of impotence disguised by verbalism: taking a stand on legal positions which cannot become a reality and planning counter-measures for contingencies that always differ from the one at hand. At critical times we were left to our own devices; the verbalists had nothing to offer.“

The verbalists are back and their headquarters are in Washington D.C. But nobody is forcing us to kowtow to their orders. Following this lead – even if calculatingly and somewhat reluctantly as in the case of Merkel – does not protect the German people, but may well endanger it. This fact remains a fact even if it was not the American but the Russians who were responsible for the original damage in the Crimean and in eastern Ukraine.

Willy Brandt decided clearly differently than Merkel in the present, and that in a clearly more intense situation. As he recalls, he had awoken on the morning of August 13, 1961 “wide awake and at the same time numb“. He had stopped over in Hanover on a trip when he received reports from Berlin about work being done on the large wall separating the city. It was a Sunday morning and the humiliation could hardly be greater for a sitting mayor.

The Soviets had presented him with a fait accompli. The Americans had not informed him even though they had probably received some information from Moscow. Brandt remembers that an “impotent rage“ had risen in him. But what did he do? He reined in his feelings of impotence and displayed his great talent as reality-based politician which would garner him a stint as Chancellor and finally also the Nobel Prize for Peace.

With the advice from Egon Bahr, he accepted the new situation, knowing that no amount of outrage from the rest of the world would bring this wall down again for a while. He even ordered the West-Berlin police to use batons and water cannons against demonstrators at the wall in order not to slip from the catastrophe of division into the much greater catastrophe of war. He strove for the paradox which Bahr put as follows later: “We acknowledged the Status Quo in order to change it.“

And they managed to accomplish this change. Brandt and Bahr made the specific interests of the West Berlin population for who they were now responsible (from June 1962 onwards this also included this author) into the measure of their politics.

In Bonn they negotiated the Berlin subvention, an eight-percent tax-free subvention on payroll and income tax. In the vernacular it was called the “fear premium“. They also negotiated a travel permit treaty with East Berlin which made the wall permeable again two years after it was put up. Between Christmas 1963 and New Year’s 1964, 700 000 inhabitants of Berlin visited their relatives in the east of the city. Every tear of joy turned into a vote for Brandt a short while later.

The voters realized that here was someone who wanted to affect the way they lived every day, not just generate a headline for the next morning. In an almost completely hopeless situation, this SPD man fought for western values – in this case the values of freedom of movement – without bullhorns, without sanctions, without the threat of violence. The elite in Washington started hearing words that had never been heard in politics before: Compassion. Change through rapprochement. Dialog. Reconciliation of interests. And this in the middle of the Cold War, when the world powers were supposed to attack each other with venom, when the script contained only threats and protestations; set ultimatums, enforce sea blockades, conduct representative wars, this is how the Cold War was supposed to be run.

A German foreign policy striving for reconciliation – in the beginning only the foreign policy of Berlin – not only appeared courageous but also very strange.

The Americans – Kennedy, Johnson, then Nixon – followed the German; it kicked off a process which is unparalleled in the history of enemy nations. Finally, there was a meeting in Helsinki in order to set down the rules. The Soviet Union was guaranteed “non-interference into their internal affairs“ which filled party boss Leonid Brezhnev with satisfaction and made Franz Josef Strauß's blood boil. In return, the Moscow Communist Party leadership had to guarantee the West (and thus their own civil societies) “respect of human rights and fundamental freedoms, including that of thought, conscience, religion or belief“.

In this way “non-interference“ was bought through “involvement“. Communism had received an eternal guarantee for its territory, but within its borders universal human rights suddenly began to brew. Joachim Gauck remembers: “The word that allowed my generation to go on was Helsinki.“

It is not too late for the duo Merkel/Steinmeier to use the concepts and ideas of this time. It does not make sense to just follow the strategically idea-less Obama. Everyone can see how he and Putin are driving like in a dream directly towards a sign which reads: Dead End.

“The test for politics is not how something starts but how it ends“, so Henry Kissinger, also a Peace Nobel Prize winner. After the occupation of the Crimean by Russia he stated: we should want reconciliation, not dominance. Demonizing Putin is not a policy. It is an alibi for the lack thereof. He advises condensing conflicts, i.e. to make them smaller, shrink them, and then distill them into a solution.

At the moment (and for a long time before that) America is doing the opposite. All conflicts are escalated. The attack of a terror group named Al Qaida is turned into a global campaign against Islam. Iraq is bombed using dubious justifications. Then the US Air Force flies on to Afghanistan and Pakistan. The relationship to the Islamic world can safely be considered damaged.

If the West had judged the then US government which marched into Iraq without a resolution by the UN and without proof of the existence of “WMDs“ by the same standards as today Putin, then George W. Bush would have immediately been banned from entering the EU. The foreign investments of Warren Buffett should have been frozen, the export of vehicles of the brands GM, Ford, and Chrysler banned.

The American tendency to verbal and then also military escalation, the isolation, demonization, and attacking of enemies has not proven effective. The last successful major military action the US conducted was the Normandy landing. Everything else – Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan – was a clear failure. Moving NATO units towards the Polish border and thinking about arming Ukraine is a continuation of a lack of diplomacy by the military means.

This policy of running your head against the wall – and doing so exactly where the wall is the thickest – just gives you a head ache and not much else. And this considering that the wall has a huge door in the relationship of Europe to Russia. And the key to this door is labeled “reconciliation of interests“.

The first step is what Brandt called “compassion“, i.e. the ability to see the world through the eyes of the others. We should stop accusing the 143 million Russian that they look at the world differently than John McCain.

What is needed is help in modernizing the country, no sanctions which will further decrease the dearth of wealth and damage the bond of relationships. Economic relationships are also relationships. International cooperation is akin to tenderness between nations because everyone feels better afterwards.

It is well-known that Russia is an energy super-power and at the same time a developing industrial nation. The policy of reconciliation and mutual interests should attack here. Development aid in return for territorial guarantees; Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier even had the right words to describe this: modernization partnership. He just has to dust it off and use it as an aspirational word. Russia should be integrated, not isolated. Small steps in that direction are better than the great nonsense of exclusionary politics.

Brandt and Bahr have never reached for the tool of economic sanctions. They knew why: there are no recorded cases in which countries under sanctions apologized for their behavior and were obedient ever after. On the contrary: collective movements start in support of the sanctioned, as is the case today in Russia. The country was hardly ever more unified behind their president than now. This could almost lead you to think that the rabble-rousers of the West are on the payroll of the Russian secret service.

One more comment about the tone of the debate. The annexation of the Crimean was in violation of international law. The support of separatists in eastern Ukraine also does not mesh with our ideas of the state sovereignty. The boundaries of states are inviolable.

But every act requires context. And the German context is that we are a society on probation which may not act as if violations of international law started with the events in the Crimean.

Germany has waged war against its eastern neighbor twice in the past 100 years. The German soul, which we generally claim to be on the romantic side, showed its cruel side.

Of course, we who came later can continue to proclaim our outrage against the ruthless Putin and appeal to international law against him, but the way things are this outrage should come with a slight blush of embarrassment. Or to use the words of Willy Brandt: “Claims to absolutes threaten man.“

In the end, even the men who had succumbed to war fever in 1914 had to realize this. After the end of the war, the penitent issued a second call, this time to understanding between nations: “The civilized world became a war camp and battle field. It is time that a great tide of love replaces the devastating wave of hatred.“

We should try to avoid the detour via the battle fields in the 21st century. History does not have to repeat itself. Maybe we can find a shortcut.

 

- advertisements -

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:00 | 5065920 Aknownymouse
Aknownymouse's picture

Tell Vlad I will have much more flexibility once elected again. Hussein.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:02 | 5065939 dontgoforit
dontgoforit's picture

Right.  Aren't o-peach-me, and many of his supports, KGB?  Didn't they take courses in Harvard on Moscow?

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:19 | 5066052 linniepar
linniepar's picture

I've been saying this for weeks, if not months now. Something is fishy and fuck obama's flexibility. 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:21 | 5066062 economics9698
economics9698's picture

Just say it like it is, the United States is controlled by the tribe.  This means never ending wars, debt, and totalitarian government.  Good for them if they reject the bull shit we live with every day.  Fuck the tribe.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:38 | 5066182 fockewulf190
fockewulf190's picture

Been checking the MSM over here...so far no one has mentioned a peep about this article.  Not even teletext.  Looks like someone is getting the cold shoulder.  Surprising is that manager-magazin didn´t run with the story.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:41 | 5066210 Eirik Magnus Larssen
Eirik Magnus Larssen's picture

This is indeed stunning. Handelsblatt is usually a very sober and down-to-earth publication.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:55 | 5066330 fockewulf190
fockewulf190's picture

I´m sure there has been some serious phone conversations between the editor, high level managers and perhaps some CDU politicians who are being screamed at constantly.  Merkel is between a rock and a hard place because she will be absolutly pummeled in Brussels if she steers Germany away from a semi-united front with the EU and looks only toward German business interests.  The Dutch would freak out bigtime.  It could literally tear the EU apart as well as the coalition with the Social Democrats...especially since the Economic  Minister is the SPD´s main honcho Sigmar Gabriel.  She is for sure hating her job right now.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:10 | 5066443 angel_of_joy
angel_of_joy's picture

This is a sign that the German dam is leaking. It is interesting that this article appeared right after Ukraine announced what it amounts to an unilateral shutdown of the Russian gas pipelines. That, combined with the agricultural bans announced yesterday by Russia, signifies that things are about to get serious. IMHO it is now just a question of time until Merkel (who, despite all media noise, cannot afford an economic war with Russia) blinks. Either that, or her (coalition...) government will fall, and who knows, maybe some refreshed Mr. Schroeder might re-emerge as the man able to patch thinks up with a "spitefull" Russia. The countdown has started...

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:16 | 5066515 SafelyGraze
SafelyGraze's picture

great editorial!

it suggests that we are not all on the same payroll!

hugs,
barry and vlad and dave and angie

 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:01 | 5067166 Latina Lover
Latina Lover's picture

Finally, a sane voice amongst the Neocon/fascist clamor.   Imagine, diplomacy versus threats, intimidation, violence and then failure.   There is hope yet for humanity, but not from the USSA. I look forward to the day when the USSA empire enters the history books, tossed on the scrap heap of history.  The biggest winners will be Americans, who will finally be freed of the Neocon diseased violence meme, free to pursue individual paths of excellence, instead of herded into new 21st horrors.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:08 | 5067232 gh0atrider
gh0atrider's picture

 

 

 

Get modern or get fucked!

 

Buh Bitcoin Today!!

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:17 | 5067301 The Longest Call
The Longest Call's picture

"Up until today" my ass... You think maybe they turned sides when they found out we were spying on them, or had stolen their gold?  Jim Willie called this some time back:

https://www.perpetualassets.com/news/2014/07/18/jim-willie-breaking-germ...

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:49 | 5067437 Manthong
Manthong's picture

Do not confuse the KGB with Satan or the NSA.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:35 | 5067630 Leonardo Fibonacci2
Leonardo Fibonacci2's picture

“To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize.” -Voltaire

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 21:41 | 5068576 economics9698
economics9698's picture

Zionist.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 23:27 | 5068854 Elvis the Pelvis
Elvis the Pelvis's picture

So what do you do?  Let Russia piss all over Europe.  Of course you need sanctions.  Bitchez.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 07:29 | 5069334 Headbanger
Headbanger's picture

I predict mustaches become popular again in Germany.

 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:38 | 5067641 Keyser
Keyser's picture

It appears the tide is turning on Uncle Sugar... It's about time... The only question is what will the US do when it becomes clear that Germany moves East, the EU collapses and the IMF melts down... Interesting times indeed...

 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 19:05 | 5067968 espirit
espirit's picture

Here we go again...

"Did it all start with the Russian invasion of the Crimean or did the West first promote the destabilization of the Ukraine?"

I stopped reading at this point.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 20:53 | 5068422 Muc Metals
Muc Metals's picture

You stopped reading because truth hurts.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 09:02 | 5069424 Squid-puppets a...
Squid-puppets a-go-go's picture

er, russia didnt invade crimea

crimea voted to go back to the motherland

before the crisis crimea had an agreement with russia that at any point it could station up to 25 000 troops there to protect vital (russian paid for) infrastructure. Before the crisis Russia had only about half that number

Even when the crisis happenned, Russia only increased its troop level to the agreed 25 000. This is presented in the west as an invasion

the man has a point

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 09:30 | 5069472 conscious being
conscious being's picture

There was no Russian "invasion" of Crimea. Russian troops where alresdy stationed there due to a treaty signed with Ukraine. Is that why he quit reading? He should have kept reading. Great article. Now we'll see who really runs Germany. BTW, Jim Willie predicted all this, even that the Handelsblatt types would be the ones objecting. Spoiler alert. He also described how it will all turn out.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 00:26 | 5068960 Marigold
Marigold's picture

Then you are an absolute idiot and have closed your mind to perhaps one of the best composed articles on the crisis from a German perspective who are key players in this developing saga.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 02:53 | 5069159 Ayr Rand
Ayr Rand's picture

These are the same German corporatists who supported Hitler. They have a new model in Putain, who meets their moral requirements. 

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 09:33 | 5069477 conscious being
conscious being's picture

Don't you have some roasted baby pics to gloat over??

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 21:13 | 5068484 Idaho potato head
Idaho potato head's picture

Sampson option?

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 02:04 | 5069108 Dr. Everett V. Scott
Dr. Everett V. Scott's picture

The old KGB is now the new and improved FSB.  It has infiltrated every major organization, including every enviro group, national newspaper, and most large defense companies.

In the case of newspapers like the NY Times, and groups like Greenpeace, the infiltration is welcome. They are all comrades, with very similar goals. And those goals are not good for America.

What the KGB/FSB could never do militarily, they are doing with the active connivance of those groups and flexible B. Hussein, the Manchurian Candidate.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:19 | 5067303 angel_of_joy
angel_of_joy's picture

Big money (German) is getting restless. Remember who is talking here... "Gabor Steingart, the chief editor of Handelsblatt, Germany's leading economic newspaper"

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 01:36 | 5069085 CheapBastard
CheapBastard's picture

“Big German Money” understands they’ll be in a world of hurt:

 

Here's from March, 2014:

 

Siemens chief says supports ties with Russian companies(Reuters)

 

 

During a trip to Moscow, in which he met Putin at his residence on Wednesday, Siemens CEO Joe Kaeser said his firm wanted to honor long-standing business contracts and did not pay too much attention to "short-term turbulences" in its business planning.

 

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/03/26/us-ukraine-germany-siemens-idU...

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:05 | 5067218 Mister Ponzi
Mister Ponzi's picture

I'm impressed. Steingart is the same clown who asked his readers some years ago to buy Greek government bonds. That did not turn out too well. Big evolution since then!

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 03:31 | 5069192 Dr. Everett V. Scott
Dr. Everett V. Scott's picture

Mister Ponzi,

I wish I had bought Greek gov't bonds.  They were paying 50% interest, now they pay less than 5%. A stupendous return.

Tbat was good advice indeed. $1 mil invested would give an annual return of $500,000.  Wish he'd have given me that advice [and that I would have listened!]

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:01 | 5067475 Kirk2NCC1701
Kirk2NCC1701's picture

Another fine report from the "Land of Molson Milk and Maple Syrup"? 

;-)

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:46 | 5067066 RafterManFMJ
RafterManFMJ's picture

The purpose of the Army in Europe is to keep the US in, the Russians out, and he Germans down.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 04:41 | 5069233 giovanni_f
giovanni_f's picture

+1

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 03:05 | 5069165 Lost My Shorts
Lost My Shorts's picture

My favorite line:

"The last successful major military action the US conducted was the Normandy landing."

Amazing to see signs that Germany is growing a pair.  For the longest time, Euro-lefties bleated about US arrogance, but Europe as a whole always fell in line and for decades were key enablers of everything the US did.  As the great poet Bryan Adams once said, "nothing can last forever."

The whole thing really is hard to figure.  Here was my uneducated guess:  Barry-O has been faxing it in for a long time, and foreign policy was not his passion to begin with.  Everything is run by his political people, who pay a lot of attention to the chattering classes of NYDC, and are desperate not to have the Democrats called weak.  They thought it politically expedient to give the Vicky Nuland and her neocon plumbers a free hand in Eastern Europe, because then the White House couldn't be called weak.  Perhaps Barry also didn't mind to give Putin a bit of trouble to get even for Putin's non-cooperation on Iran and Syria.  The neocons told Barry that Putin was in a weak position -- baroquely corrupt tyrant (despite the man-love he gets at ZH), bad for his people, not strong enough at home to fight abroad.  Barry was too busy with his tee-shot on the 14th hole to question their advice.  Probably the White House never really thought much about what might happen.  And they were totally unprepared when Ukraine blew up, and they have been kinda making it up ever since.  They have a political need to look tough, despite the fact that no one in the White House personally gives a crap about Ukraine, and their every move seems to dig the hole deeper, and their poll numbers would go through the zero line if they actually got US troops involved.  Barry probably walks around the White House whistling "take this job and shove it; I ain't working here no more."

I am not one to ever doubt the power of the Tribe in Washington, but what is their angle here?  Yes, the Israel lobby is unhappy with Putin for supporting Iran and supplying them with nuclear technology.  But how does the Ukrainian cluster-frog help?  If it was AIPAC's idea, so far it looks like either a miscalculation or a very long game.  If you can draw a line from the Ukraine mess to the US bombing Iran, congratulations you win the prize.

The score so far:  standing up to the West for mother Russia has made the corrupt tyrant very popular bordering on invincible at home.  Ethnic Ukrainians are not willing to fight to keep the Russian speakers under their control, so the separatists have no risk of military defeat.  Barry finds himself the foster-dad of two ethnically divided failed states that don't make sense, when all he wants is to have dinner parties and play golf.

But some things are so bad they are good.  If Barry succeeds in growing a pair on Europe, and stranding the neocons in a ditch outside of Donetsk, and ending US imperium, it would benefit the American people and be the greatest accomplishment by an American president since forever.  So what if he did it by accident.  A win's a win. 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:15 | 5066498 Freddie
Freddie's picture

The EU is total shit.   It is filled with criminals like the US Senate and the scum running Kiev.  The EU is bad for all Europeans including Germans.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:36 | 5067387 quadratic_equation
quadratic_equation's picture

I disagree...I believe ISIS is the "Waterloo" because ISIS is supported by Saudi Arabia and they control OPEC (petrodollar).  Once the Saudi's gets pissed at Obama for bombing the ISIS that will be the end of OPEC.  That's also the reason why Obama supported and armed ISIS against Hassad in Syria to make the Saudi's happy and now his hands are tide going after ISIS in Iraq but in limited manner not to pissed off the Saudi's.  Iraq will eventually fall to ISIS control because this is what the Saudi's want and Obama couldn't do anything about it; otherwise, US "Waterloo" will occur.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:04 | 5067485 Kirk2NCC1701
Kirk2NCC1701's picture

Hey, quadratic_equation,

Eureka, I've got it!  http://mathworld.wolfram.com/QuadraticEquation.html

;-)

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 19:15 | 5068003 espirit
espirit's picture

Perhaps it would be best to re-read Oded Yinyons take on creating Arab nation states.

Crucify, then divide.

Isis will persevere, then 'dissolve' when they have served their purpose (aka useful idiots).

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 01:24 | 5069068 Ward no. 6
Ward no. 6's picture

that doesn't look very interesting

i think the proof of an area of a circle is more interesting

http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/187987/calculus-proof-for-the-ar...

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:41 | 5067655 Keyser
Keyser's picture

ISIS has played their masters for fools and have their own agenda... If SA were in control, why are they bolstering troops on the border and are afraid that ISIS will destroy Mecca?

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 09:45 | 5069110 conscious being
conscious being's picture

I agree ISIS is off the reservation, but they are so toast. They're making it a contest between USA, Russia, Iran, Syria, Hezbula and Iraq and the Kurds about who can claim the most ISIS scalps. Good luck surviving that in a wide open desert with little or no cover.

Edit: I see August has a post following this where he's predicting ISIS Caliphate success.

IMO, ISIS was sent into Iraq to die.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 13:34 | 5070158 11b40
11b40's picture

Once you unleash the relegious fanatics, there is no controlling them, and this feels like a fire that has been started on purpose but may be burning out of control.

Pandora's box has been thrown open, but there is some very mysterious leadership at the top calling the shots here.  This rapid military offensive exhibits unusual planning, coordination, and execution.  How has this been accomplished?  How is their command & control communications network invisible to our intelligence operations?

Hmmm....maybe...nah, we wouldn't do that, would we?  Would we?

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 19:45 | 5068158 August
August's picture

>>>Iraq will eventually fall to ISIS control because this is what the Saudi's want

Ultimately, Iraq will be divided between the Sunni-Saudi factions, and those of Iran.  Tehran will not allow a militant Sunni state to rule the Shia area of Iraq, hard on the Iranian border, and their own Arabistan.

New borders are easy enough to draw - ask the Brits: give a disinterested guy from Oxbridge a map, a desk and a pen.  Worked great in India.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 22:55 | 5068790 TheReplacement
TheReplacement's picture

It is times like this that great leaders step up and lead the way.  I'm not betting we have any great leaders in the west today. 

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 03:17 | 5069174 California Nigh...
California Nightmares's picture

Don't know what Obama would do if he could do, but he's too weak to do anything but follow orders. 

In times like these, Nixon looks good. He was a real president, even if more than a bit naughty.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 03:35 | 5069194 Dr. Everett V. Scott
Dr. Everett V. Scott's picture

Nixon was a GREAT President. He knew how the game was played — with a treaty in one hand, and a switchblade in the other.

History will treat Nixon better than the WaPo ever did.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:35 | 5067379 Cast Iron Skillet
Cast Iron Skillet's picture

it still is.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:52 | 5066316 WTFx10
WTFx10's picture

Just like Germany pre-WW2.

We did lose WW2 didn't we?

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:14 | 5066858 ThroxxOfVron
ThroxxOfVron's picture

History would seem to indicate that the victor in a conflict/war is the aggresor which is left holding/controlling the most landmass/resources at the end of the conflict/war.

When WW2 ended it was the USSR that had gained control of the largest volume of landmass over which it had not previously controlled.

IMHO that fact pretty much sums up who had won what at the conclusion of hostilites.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 01:32 | 5069079 piliage
piliage's picture

Yes, but traditionally then they don't shut off the economy with communism. In fact the soviets blocked international competition from the traditionally powerful Prussia when they implemented the blockade and built the wall effectively giving the USA market monopoly in Europe. In that way, yes, the USA was the big winner as it gained the most economically.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:47 | 5067082 The Proletariat
The Proletariat's picture

We did lose WW2 didn't we?

Yes.  Because nobody wins in war...


Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:31 | 5066606 SMG
SMG's picture

"Just say it like it is, the United States is controlled by the tribe"  You are implying the Oligarchs are Jewish, but ther're not.   They're more fond of Lucifer actually.   You wouldn't want to blame the wrong people right? 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:45 | 5066709 Herd Redirectio...
Herd Redirection Committee's picture

Maybe he implied a Tribe of Zionists?

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:43 | 5067045 InTheLandOfTheBlind
InTheLandOfTheBlind's picture

Political ideologies do not equate to tribes.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 09:51 | 5069512 conscious being
conscious being's picture

That's the enchalada they want you to swallow.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 23:00 | 5068804 TheReplacement
TheReplacement's picture

Ah there I get it.  That is a terrible use of the language.  A much more applicable and accurate phrase might be Gang of Criminals.  Tribe means blood relations.  There is no way all the people behind this are related - Pols (Obama), Bankers, MIC, petty tyrant beaurocrats...  There is a long list of people in on it.

Would people start using Gang of Criminals instead.  It will be factual and much less hateful, thereby not crazy paranoid Nazi sounding.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 09:56 | 5069524 conscious being
conscious being's picture

How about the antiSemetism term? Is that a terrible, Orwellian NewSpeak use of language? I mean the Semetics are the people getting slaughtered and maimed in Gaza. Who are the 'anti's?

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:30 | 5067336 HamFistedIdiot
HamFistedIdiot's picture

The highest level Zionists are members of a Secret Society, the Death Set, and while they may pay homage to their respective religions (Christian or Jewish) they are more indebted to their true God Lucifer/Baal. All this drive toward centralized control (EU, NAFTA, WTO, NATO) is fueled by their soulless greed.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:58 | 5067172 Thisson
Thisson's picture

Enough with your decisive bullshit.  Believe it or not there are plenty of Jews who are pissed off at Obama and that want to End the Fed.  Go fuck yourself.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 19:36 | 5068110 WhackoWarner
WhackoWarner's picture

Most people do understand that Jewish does not EQUAL Zionist.  Not like I say potatoe  and you say POTato. 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 23:13 | 5068835 TheReplacement
TheReplacement's picture

See my post above.  Zionist is not a good word for it.  Tribe is bad too.  One means there is a blood relationship and the other a sort of nationalism, as in for the good of 'the people and the nation'.  The people making all of these bad things happen are not related, hence no tribe.  Many of them do not care what happens to their people or their nation, hence no zionism.  This diverse subset of people really don't share anything in common beyond being criminals of the first order.  They are a Gang of Criminals.  I use criminals because they don't just lie, cheat, steal, murder.  No, they do them all and even worse, they get others to do these things willfully or not, aware or ignorantly.  They are manipulators without conscience. 

What's worse is there isn't just one gang.  There appear to be several.  If all the Muslims were on the same team they wouldn't be killing each other.  Same for white people going to the verge of WWIII.  Latin America is just a cesspool with little tyrants here, there, everywhere.  Examples are limitless.  Within the just the US you have many factions; the MIC, bankers, unions, team red, team blue, and so on.  They are like the olympic rings with different spheres that overlap here and there.  Sometimes the overlap looks like cooperation like the Patriot Act and how that gives them more power over us or it looks like conflict like when one party tries to put the other on trial. 

I'm not sure that accepting reality and trying to reconcile with them all is going to work for us. 

Wow that took a turn.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 10:01 | 5069537 conscious being
conscious being's picture

Sorry Replacement, Zionism is the enemy. At its most basic, Zionism is a racist, apparthied ideology.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:53 | 5066322 Ondoron
Ondoron's picture

Btw. polls in Germany show that 80% of the Germans think pro Russian. The MSM propaganda does not succeed!

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:10 | 5066457 fockewulf190
fockewulf190's picture

Really?  If you have a link to one please post it if you would.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:45 | 5066716 aleph0
aleph0's picture

Ondoron is correct.

The number I saw was 79% ... good enough .

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:01 | 5067189 InTheLandOfTheBlind
InTheLandOfTheBlind's picture

I guess your text is a good as a link.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:43 | 5067661 disabledvet
disabledvet's picture

To the Khuban! The Volga Germans will be avenged!

(Oh, wait...we're already in the Khuban.)

To the Volga then! AND BEYOND!

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 20:42 | 5068378 tvdog
tvdog's picture

NTV did a telephone survey and suppressed the results when 89% indicated "understanding" of Putin's position:

http://www.sott.net/article/279079-German-media-censors-poll-result-show...

BTW, use of polls to manipulate public opinion is an old tactic first employed by the Tavistock Institute back in World War I.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 14:29 | 5070352 papaclop
papaclop's picture

The only flexibility I've seen in the White House is the backstroking Slobama did on Syria. Putin is not evil, he is a much better chess player than Slobama.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:34 | 5066139 Bokkenrijder
Bokkenrijder's picture

KGB? The KGB no longer exists.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KGB

ZH needs to check some facts: many years ago, the KGB was split up into the FSB for domestic and counter-intellegence, and the SVR for international intellegence gathering.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Security_Service

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_Intelligence_Service_%28Russia%29

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:27 | 5066578 MsCreant
MsCreant's picture

Too literal.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:38 | 5066668 Herd Redirectio...
Herd Redirection Committee's picture

There were excessive Cold War references in the article, which don't help IMO, but it shows the background of the author, as well as his target audience.

 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:20 | 5066888 dontgoforit
dontgoforit's picture

Westerners understand what 'KGB' means, split or not.  Geo. H.W. Bush was Director CIA, so essentially, Putin has held the counterparty position.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:27 | 5067342 Socratic Dog
Socratic Dog's picture

Got it.  And the moon is made of green cheese, right?

Read his lips.  The kgb hasn't existed for 23 years.  Headline writer looks fucking stupid.  End of story.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 23:19 | 5068841 TheReplacement
TheReplacement's picture

So someone wrote a wiki page and now the kgb doesn't exist?  So what if it was split?  Who do both arms ultimately work for - the same guy they used to work for back in the day. 

If you have a sandwich and cut it in half you still have a sandwich.

Did you read the ZH article above?  You have to first accept reality.  Putin is still in charge of what was the kgb.  Hence it is accurate to refer to it as the kgb still.  It does the same thing and works for the same guy even if it is called new names.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 10:13 | 5069557 conscious being
conscious being's picture

MsCreant - not too literal. Part of the Knoodleman-Kaganites agenda is to conflate the new Russia with the old Soviet Union. Given the Holdomor, this has special signifigance in the Ukraine. Strangely, the descendants of those who ran the Holdomor are now running the Junta in Kiev. I would think the typical Ukrainian would be pretty upset about that.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:04 | 5065955 Serfs Up
Serfs Up's picture

Energy.  The entire op-ed skipped over the energy part.  How can that still be true in this day and age?  Energy is *everything*, the rest is noise.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:07 | 5065984 1000yrdstare
1000yrdstare's picture

Bingo! the Germans like Russian energy....soon to be cut off by the Ukes....

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:32 | 5066131 MarsInScorpio
MarsInScorpio's picture

I noticed he skipped over the Kosovo vote to break away and become an independent country. For some reason, critics of the Ukrainian votes fail to mention that the legal concept of voting oneself out of a country was validated in Kosovo.

  

They also fail to mention the illegal acts of the US in funding a violent overthrow of a legitimately elected democratic government - and fail to call for the issuance of an international warrant for the arrest and trial of the perps who funneled the $5-billion to the Nazis who now occupy the government buildings in Kiev.

 

Minor points . . . right.

-30-

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:32 | 5066142 BlindMonkey
BlindMonkey's picture

I am just happy to see somebody in the west take a breath and advocate for...wait for it.....statesmanship.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:59 | 5067467 OpenThePodBayDoorHAL
OpenThePodBayDoorHAL's picture

We all know this is about one thing: money. With their prior shitstorms winding down (Iraq, Afghanistan) they desperately needed another way to channel taxpayer dollars into more war. We tried Libya, Egypt, Syria, now it's Ukraine

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:45 | 5067668 Keyser
Keyser's picture

Think big picture... If Ukraine cuts off their nose to spite their face and shuts down the pipelines to southern EU, the ONLY pipeline into eastern Europe from Russia goes to Germany... KaChing!!!!

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 02:51 | 5069155 old naughty
old naughty's picture

but wait...are you in effect saying the opposite is true: 

"This could almost lead you to think that the rabble-rousers of the West are on the payroll of the Russian secret service." 

"This could almost lead you to think that the rabble-rousers of the German papers are on the payroll of the Russian secret service?"

 

So the oligarchs will help, no?

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 10:22 | 5069569 conscious being
conscious being's picture

One of the points he's making is that the German papers are in a kind of rabid lock-step with the Zato line. Maybe the MSM in Germany is all bought off, just like the USA! USA! MSM? Certainly looks to be the case.  Don't you agree? Maybe the Ruppert Murdochs and other Western Oligarchs are helping out, wink, wink, if you know what I mean. Do you think so?

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:45 | 5067669 disabledvet
disabledvet's picture

And Iraq.

Again.

"Third times a charm Big Brother!"

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:58 | 5066783 crazzziecanuck
crazzziecanuck's picture

Kosovo didn't vote itself out of anything.  All Kosovo has been allowed to become is a parcelled off part of Serbia/Yugoslavia to become an American military base, like Guantanamo Bay.  But with a token "elected leadership" that can't do anything without Washington's approval.

Kosovo isn't a good example here, except for Western hypocrisy when it comes to military interventions on the other side of the globe.

 

With regards to this portion:

"The last successful major military action the US conducted was the Normandy landing. Everything else – Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan – was a clear failure."

The author has forgotten about Grenada and Panama.  lol

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:12 | 5067259 FlyingDutchman
FlyingDutchman's picture

Cuba was also a great success.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 19:55 | 5068208 August
August's picture

"The last successful major military action the US conducted was the Normandy landing. Everything else – Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan – was a clear failure."

Successful enough. 

"The purpose of war...  is not victory."

  -  Emmanuel Goldstein

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 10:32 | 5069593 conscious being
conscious being's picture

Kosovo isn't a good example here, except for Western hypocrisy when it comes to military interventions on the other side of the globe.

Huh? Isn't a good example?

I think he was trying to draw attention to Western hypocrisy. And appropriately so. Kosovo set a precedent whether Zato likes it or not.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:19 | 5066874 ThroxxOfVron
ThroxxOfVron's picture

No Administration in any nation on this Earth wishes to concede the right of individuals to their self determination.  The plantation system must be maintained at all costs lest the citizenries opt out of the bureaucracies and their programmes and/or rise up in arms against the machinations of the management classes of the Corporate States.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 23:21 | 5068844 TheReplacement
TheReplacement's picture

His point was to be realistic.  You can rave about everything under the sun and nobody will listen.  He is simply calling for everyone to take a deep breath and take an objective and realistic look at this showdown with Russia before it turns into a war.  He was being realistic to set an example.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:22 | 5066078 Sudden Debt
Sudden Debt's picture

THe war is between those who own the energy. And we don't own it, we pay for it.
So is it for the Americans, they fight for the oil and gas and when they come home, sometimes shot to pieces or shell shocked, they still have to pay for it.
And those who own it, won't send their kids to war. At least not on a battlefield at the front lines.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:39 | 5066672 Herd Redirectio...
Herd Redirection Committee's picture

Germany is a worldwide leader in wind energy.  Not enough to replace gas or coal or nuclear, but its a supplement.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:47 | 5066724 Sandmann
Sandmann's picture

Total joke. Germany imports nuclear electricity from France. Windpower is de-stabilising the electricity grid in Czechoslovakia and Poland.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:56 | 5066786 NotApplicable
NotApplicable's picture

Is that due to intermittent production?

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:59 | 5066799 crazzziecanuck
crazzziecanuck's picture

Yes. And this is why German has prematurely ended nuclear power and instead built over a dozen coal power plants in 2013 alone.  Wind is intermittent, but solar has this nasty trait of not producing power when it's actually needed (i.e., at night).

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:56 | 5067154 Herd Redirectio...
Herd Redirection Committee's picture

Well, wind serves a purpose, because its easier to scale up and down.

If you need more energy, and the coal plants are all online, not a lot you can do.  Similarly, if you need to just decrease energy by a few % points (the ebbs and flows throughout the day/night)  its easier to shut down some wind turbines than some nuclear or coal plants.

The key is storing the energy until it is needed/is not disruptive. 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 23:13 | 5068827 piliage
piliage's picture

Easier to scale down? wtf? If by 'scale down' you mean bury millions of kilowatts in the dirt thrown away, great. The Germans spend 12 bil euros a year subsidizing 'clean' energy that has actually forced them to import 33 million metric tons of coal. And, for extra bonus points, they have the highest cost per kilowatt in the eu. And the tragic irony in all this is the USA is exporting 10 mil metric tons of coal a year to Germany, literally exporting its carbon footprint to 'green' Germany. Germany's renewable strategy is a left wing vote whoring cluster fuck of stupid epic proportions.

Oh, and despite them spending a gagillion euros on renewables, there were two weeks in December of 2013 of cold, cloudy, sub freezing weather with no wind where Germany produced fuck all energy from renewables and the grid was pushed to the breaking point due to poor investments in alternatives to unreliable renewables. Great strategy they have being ass fucked by the Green Party.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 19:44 | 5071214 Parrotile
Parrotile's picture

The problem with "renewable" energy (in the form of Solar PV / Wind) is that both technologies are quite picky w.r.t. to operating conditions. Solar is VERY susceptible to even slight cloud cover / haze (along the lines of a 50% reduction in output - we have a small PV installation on our floating home, and I am very aware of just how much our panels shove into the batteries at any time!)

Wind power is just as picky re. windspeed - not enough, and the output is pretty feeble; "too much" (and a reasonably stiff gale is FAR too much!) and the output drops to feeble once again, in order to "protect" the turbine. Remember that wind energy increases as the cube of wind speed, and "rated power output" is usually around maximum safe speed, so your "1kW" turbine might not be that great a generating source unless you live in a particularly windy area, with a fairly constant (and high) wind speed.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:27 | 5067063 daemon
daemon's picture

" Total joke."

Not at all. The Germans can export electricity relatively often it seems. To the point that in other european countries some people don't hesitate to call this : unfair competition. As you may know it, the german government, in its willingness to get out of nuclear energy, subsidises massively projects of renewable energy.

You can take a look at the page 8 of this document:

http://www.ise.fraunhofer.de/en/downloads-englisch/pdf-files-englisch/ne...

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:43 | 5066944 ThroxxOfVron
ThroxxOfVron's picture

I agree.  The Oligarchs and thier progeny are never required to sacrifice themselves first to uphold the resource extraction and retail distribution matrix.

Ditto for the warmongers and war profiteers.

The sons of the Untied States Congress were not REQUIRED to take the point when the U.S. stormed Normandy.

Maybe the President and the entire U.S. Congress should have been seated/conveined in the embassy compound in Bagdad for the last several years.  

I think that the war would have been avoided entirely and/or prosecuted quite differently if Bush and Cheney and the whole Rep/Dem clown brigade had been stranded inside the Green Zone since the morning that the armoured column drove into Bagdad.  

Just imagine them: Bush, Cheney, McCain, Clinton, Pelosi, Reid, Schumer, Obama, Rangel, etc., etc.: ALL sitting in a room togethr in Bagdad while the Iraq War with it's IEDs and suicide bombers and the works raging in the streets and markets around them for the last decade or so...  NO Administration would ever go to war again without absolutely exhausting every alternative.

IF the Oligarchs and Statist Hawks want wars let them sit right in the fucking trenches and holes at the front with their husbands/wives and children for the entire duration.

 

Likewise to the point with the isolation of the Oligarchy from the damage caused by managing the resource extraction and retail distribution matrix.

You want SAFE nuclear power?

-FORCE the largest bond and shareholders, the entire corporate upper management, and all of the regulators involved in ever aspect of safety and diligence to live right inside the nuclear plant compounds.  In the event of ( so much as any perception of ) a problem: lock them all inside and shoot anyone that tries to get out before the ( perceived ) problem is mitigated entirely.

IMHO, absoutely everyone involved with managing and regulating TEPCO should have been and should still be inprisoned inside the actual perimiter of the damaged Fukushima plants today.

 

IF the Oligarchs and Statist Hawks want to make money running scemes with dirty power/nuke waste/etc. let them live right in the shadow of the smokestacks next to the rod pools and slag heaps with their husbands/wives and children for the entire duration.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:13 | 5067424 daemon
daemon's picture

" IMHO, absoutely everyone involved with managing and regulating TEPCO should have been and should still be inprisoned inside the actual perimiter of the damaged Fukushima plants today. "

I'm not 100% sure but Japan doesn't apply death penalty anymore, you know ? 

 

After checking, I realize I was wrong. They still do apply death penalty.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:39 | 5066181 Captain Willard
Captain Willard's picture

The author would sacrifice some style points if he just cam right out and discussed energy. So he took us on a walk down memory lane, cleverly recounting the story of the development of Ostpolitik from the Realpolitik perspective. But it's all the same stuff.

The difference nowadays is that Germany is reunited. We can debate whether Ostpolitik had more impact on modern-day central Europe than the Cold Warriors from Kennedy to Reagan. I'm thinking that there was synergy between both strategies.

However, the Germans need somthing fresher than the author's freeze-dried perspectives. True, the US failed a lot. But German success and reunification was to some extent built on the back of these failures. What does he suggest now?

Realism? Yes, this is a start. But whose reality beckons? Putin's? 

So let the Germans handle this one. He's right - it's their time and their turn. We'll see how useful the author's history lesson is in developing detente in Eastern Europe. They have to live with the results, so it's only fair.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:24 | 5066560 Freddie
Freddie's picture

The people and banskters behind all this shit in Europe and the middle east have been making money off of wars with Chiristians killing Christians, Muslism and Christians killing each other and all variations.   They profit from chaos and killing someone else's children.

They control the media and until they are brought to heel then nothing will change.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:41 | 5066692 Herd Redirectio...
Herd Redirection Committee's picture

Not only profit, Divide and Conquer.

In other words, Divide and RULE.  You got to keep people divided.  And divided in as many ways as possible, to provide as little potential for UNITY as possible.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:13 | 5066853 Badabing
Badabing's picture

"The people and banskters behind all this shit in Europe"
I believe it's all to create instability in Europe to bring an end to the euro!

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 20:11 | 5068252 August
August's picture

>>>However, the Germans need somthing fresher than the author's freeze-dried perspectives.

...Realism? Yes, this is a start. But whose reality beckons? Putin's?

My spin is that Germany isn't looking to become the dependent appendage of a new big brother, but for a partner whose resources have synergies with Germany's own strengths and weaknesses. 

The only benefit I see Germany getting out of the current US-NATO relationship is that they have a military guarantee against Russian aggression, which, frankly, is a guarantee that Germany no longer needs.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:06 | 5065973 zorba THE GREEK
zorba THE GREEK's picture

The rats are starting to jump the ship of fools

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:07 | 5065986 McMolotov
McMolotov's picture

Over the past half-century of playing World Police and Corporate Enforcer, the United States has squandered all the credibility and moral standing it once enjoyed. We are witnessing the rest of the world turning away from a dying superpower.

The backlash has been building for decades now. If the last century was the American Century, this one will be the Anti-American Century.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:29 | 5066124 johny2
johny2's picture

the country that has to accept that its gold is "stored' in usa and uk, and has usa millitary base is less independent than the countries in soviet union were. 

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:01 | 5066389 El Vaquero
El Vaquero's picture

 

If the last century was the American Century, this one will be the Anti-American Century.

On that, I disagree.  I don't see the US surviving in its current form.  I see it breaking up, or simply ceasing to exist.  Maybe something will rise from the ashes, maybe not, but in a few decades, "America" will elicit a response on par with "Yeah, those assholes?" and this country will be relegated to the history books.  It won't be anti-American.  It will be non-American.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:55 | 5067691 disabledvet
disabledvet's picture

The English Empire lasted a long time dude. Seems ridiculous even in retrospect actually.

The USA only had two "imperial possessions" in her history...Cuba and the Phillipines. Look how Cuba turned out. Or worse still...Florida.

Hard to tell if "Secret Plan ZATO" is to add another 100 States to the Union or not. Right now it looks like we have 49 too many actually.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 19:08 | 5067987 Keyser
Keyser's picture

"America" will survive, but as part of the "North American Union"... 

The beatings will continue until morale improves...

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:31 | 5066601 Renfield
Renfield's picture

This editorial is my first indication that Barky may actually face a war crimes tribunal within the not-so-far future. I think Ukraine will prove a bridge too far for NATO.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:02 | 5066391 Anusocracy
Anusocracy's picture

Leaving the USS Flying Dutchman.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:10 | 5066000 williambanzai7
williambanzai7's picture

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:34 | 5066154 john39
john39's picture

that was a pretty low blow against Thomas...

Sun, 08/10/2014 - 21:36 | 5074623 shiftless
shiftless's picture

Hey man I hate to criticize you cause I love your artwork, but could you please post your pics in lower resolution or something? Every time I load a ZeroHedge article it sits there for 5 minutes downloading your pics long after everything else is loaded. I would just click "STOP" to end the page load, but I do want to see your pictures. I save each and every article to disk to be archived for posterity, so FYI your name and work will be remembered even if 90% of the world is nuked to oblivion. Have a good one bud.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:13 | 5066012 Jumbotron
Jumbotron's picture

Sounds like somebody doesn't want to be very, very cold this winter.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:25 | 5066091 Sudden Debt
Sudden Debt's picture

2 to 3 more months and winters there.
And to make maters worse, there's 3 nuclear installations who won't be working at full capacity due to malfunctions and cracked vessels.
This will be fun....
And in total, about 30% of europe's industry runs on gas...
This will be fun...

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:52 | 5066297 Jumbotron
Jumbotron's picture

No cheap energy from Russia......no European hope for recovery.

Not that there is much now.  But will just hasten things a bit.

Russian Honey Badger doesn't care.  Russian Honey Badger doesn't give a shit.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:04 | 5066825 crazzziecanuck
crazzziecanuck's picture

Cheap and energy as quickly diverging.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:09 | 5067242 zjxn06
zjxn06's picture

"No cheap energy from Russia......no European hope for recovery."

No problem.  Germans could just pay with some of their gold.  Oh, wait...

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 23:32 | 5068865 TheReplacement
TheReplacement's picture

If you are at the point where you have to trade your gold for a fuel that will be used once and gone, you better be buying it to run your war machines because you are going to need to go take the rest of it once the gold runs out.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 10:45 | 5069623 conscious being
conscious being's picture

Sing that song to Gordon Brown who dumped 1/2 th UK's for a song, The Brown Bottom. How's that tune go?

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 19:11 | 5068000 Keyser
Keyser's picture

With the sanctions russia placed on imported goods today, the EU won't make it to winter before imploding... Half their domestic agro output goes to Russia... 

 

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 10:51 | 5069633 conscious being
conscious being's picture

Its harvest season in Russia comming up, so they have a buffer to arrainge other deals while the people enjoy local.

Where as the Western farmer eho was planning to export to Russia can do what with his harvest before it spoils?

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 12:44 | 5070014 schadenfreude
schadenfreude's picture

You are a stupid fuck Keyser. Why don't you keep Your mouth shut? I have yet to see one post with at least some logic conclusion or some facts. Just spewing your unfoundwd opinions more pften doesn't make them more credible.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:34 | 5066092 Bokkenrijder
Bokkenrijder's picture

The KGB?!?! The KGB was disolved in 1991!Wake up ZH! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KGB

For the sake of ZH's credibility, perhaps it's better to quickly check Wikipedia when making referenses to the Russian intelligence services. For domestic spying there's the FSB, and for international operations there's the SVR;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Security_Service

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_Intelligence_Service_%28Russia%29

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:04 | 5066169 MarsInScorpio
MarsInScorpio's picture

Maybe it's not ZH's job to run editorial corrections in the copy of another journal. You don't have a right to change the meaning of another's essay.

 

Write the publication that wrote it.

-30-

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 14:23 | 5066545 Bokkenrijder
Bokkenrijder's picture

Well, Handelsblatt DIDN'T write it! Search the article on the letters "kgb" (control + F) and you won't find anything.

You're right though, ZH shouldn't quote things that simply aren't there!

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:40 | 5067025 Bokkenrijder
Bokkenrijder's picture

p.s. funny to see that I get so many negative kudos. It's not that I really care though, but it's a perfect illustration of how easily the supposedly 'critical thinkers' here on ZH, turn into sheeple as they clearly prefer to be presented with not only wrong facts, but also an incorrect representation of the Handelsblatt article.

Hong Kong is obviously not a city in Brazil, that was an easy 'score' for ZH, but the fact that the KGB was dissolved 23 (!) years ago does not seem to bother the Golden Truthseekers here... http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-08/whats-wrong-picture

As a matter of fact, in true CNN style, ZeroHedge still touts "...on the payroll of the KGB" in the title of this thread. ;-)

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 15:58 | 5067164 Herodotus
Herodotus's picture

Details, details!  The Germanic types are always worried about details.  This is why they lost the war.  Can't see the forest for the trees.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 19:11 | 5068006 Keyser
Keyser's picture

Anyone that uses Wiki are a reference for "factual" information doesn't deserve a response... 

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 06:57 | 5069314 Bokkenrijder
Bokkenrijder's picture

OK, here's a link from Encyclopedia Britannica: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/203373/Federal-Security-Servic...

Happy now, you crazy fuck? Or you still prefer to be brainwashed?

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 10:56 | 5069659 conscious being
conscious being's picture

I'm with you on this Bokkenman. Its not benign to conflate the two. Present day Russia is not the communist dictatorship that was the Soviet Union.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 20:20 | 5068288 August
August's picture

The Germans lost their 20th century wars becasue their leadership bit off more than they could chew;  they may have been brilliant at modern warfare, but ultimately they were dumb as bricks strategically and diplomatically.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 17:35 | 5067595 booboo
booboo's picture

Stunning Cunt or Cunning Stunt?

The later............. and yer falling for it

It reads like a misdirection attempt to blame this shit show on "The Tea Party", "The "Republican vote(r)" and anyone but B.O.

Even when trying to tell the truth the best they can manage is half truth that results in nothing more than half lies by a German Newspaper and also a fish wrap no doubt instrumental in waging a war of propaganda against the German anti Federal Reserve movement in calling them "Nazi's" Their words, not mine.

More Weak Sauce and Blather.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 23:36 | 5068872 TheReplacement
TheReplacement's picture

What are you talking about?  This guy is just trying to keep Germany from freezing to death or worse, war with Russia again.  If there is a war between the US/EU and Russia who cares who is blamed?  We'll all be dead.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 06:08 | 5069282 Ghordius
Ghordius's picture

are you pissed because the Tea Party is not mentioned in the friendliest terms only in this excellent German article? Read again, the author just wrote that we Europeans can't afford the luxury of looking at Russia as the Tea Party does

he is not happy with the whole US political establishment, and this is very visible in this other part:

"The politics of escalation show that Europe sorely misses a realistic goal. It's a different thing in the US. Threats and posturing are simply part of the election preparations. When Hillary Clinton compares Putin with Hitler, she does so only to appeal to the Republican vote, i.e. people who do not own a passport. For many of them, Hitler is the only foreigner they know, which is why Adolf Putin is a very welcome fictitious campaign effigy. In this respect, Clinton and Obama have a realistic goal: to appeal to the people, to win elections, to win another Democratic presidency."

a bit undiplomatic. but yes, this guy is not the only European exasperated by various kinds of Americans, including the gullibles, the never-traveled-around-but-know-it-all, the Adolf Hitler crowd, the Putin Fan Clubs, the Cowboys-Without-A-State, the America-First-Bombs-First, the Great-War-Is-Coming-Now trolls and believers, the Zombie Apocalypse Brain Eaters, the Christianity Will Triumph Over Evil Islam Purists... and the politicians who found out that the American Electorate is not interested in truth, only truthiness (you know, the one that you "feel is right") and deliver a political propaganda that is both cynic and full of threats and posturing

I repeat: exasperated. look at your comment. you reacted like if this article was

"a misdirection attempt to blame this shit show on "The Tea Party", "The "Republican vote(r)" and anyone but B.O."

FULL PARTISANSHIP GOGGLES ENGAGED?

this guy actually gave the Dems a way bigger blow in this article. for us Europeans it's insane that Clinton is comparing Putin with Hitler in such a casual way

but that is our problem, isn't it? it's the American power, casualness, carelessness, utter lack of attention and of course currency... and our problems

and so, yes. "people without a passport" (PWP) is a European prejudice. Perhaps an unfair one. It would be interesting to see how many PWPs are Republicans or Tea Party adherents or libertarians. But you have to understand that people like the author have this prejudice, and it goes very, very far down a rabbit hole you might not like at all

the kindest version of it is... childlike

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 08:44 | 5069393 booboo
booboo's picture

"It would be interesting to see how many PWP are......"
Really?
And who has the partisanship goggles on?
For someone who is seeped in their social stew and unwillingness to admit that Germany has a piss poor record of decision making at the highest level it must be painful to admit that while it's mouth pieces are pretending to understand and deflect they are the ones throwing around the Nazi label in order to kowtow a lockstep populace which should give you an indication of where you are headed. As for this great rag of record, you never addressed my other point. In other words, how many times have you joined in the press labeled "nazi" anti fed rally's in the German streets?

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 11:10 | 5069696 conscious being
conscious being's picture

Booboo, the poor author is trying to run his business while avoiding demands for more reparations. Maybe he pulled a few punches. The great point to me here is that here is an alternate, powerful voice to the stampede for war. A voice that better reflects how the Germans feel about recent events in Ukraine than the propaganda they're fed in the rest of their corporate, captured media.

Thanks for mentioning the End the Fed rallies.

Sat, 08/09/2014 - 12:57 | 5070051 booboo
booboo's picture

Greened you for the diplomacy and I over reacted.

Sun, 08/10/2014 - 07:29 | 5072234 Ghordius
Ghordius's picture

what partisanship goggles can the author or me have? we are both continental europeans

meanwhile your criticism of German politics is so generic to be useless

anyway, here a guy came with a calculation of passportholding and political stance in the US: http://www.theexpeditioner.com/2010/02/17/how-many-americans-have-a-pass...

takeways:

"Since there were 133,959,114 passports issued in the last 10 years, that means that 46% of the American population has a passport. For those keeping score, this means that a little less than half the population can’t fly to Canada, let alone travel to any other country in the world."

and 

"there is a striking correlation between the states that voted for Romney in 2012 and those states with the lowest number of passport holders. Those states that voted for Obama had the highest percentage of passport holders (Alaska is a notable exception — a state which is historically conservative, but no not surprisingly has a high percentage of passport ownership given its remote location)."

yet I repeat: how partisan can a foreigner outside of your country be? this is a constant source of amazement, for me, this idea that partisanship extends automatically to foreigners. a continuation of the Bush Docrine of "You are either with us or against us"?

Sun, 08/10/2014 - 13:27 | 5072894 Urban Redneck
Urban Redneck's picture

That article is a typical no-so-bright libtard trying to turn a spurious correlation into causation, as it ignores both the margin of victory and population size. Getting away from the mathematical problems, economics and limited vacation time would tend to be more of a factor in states with low passport issuance, just as border proximity and the number of multinational businesses would contribute to passport higher issuance. But one would need a lot more data for any sort of reliable conclusions.

BTW Connecticut is example of this complexity. The rich bankster hedgefund crowd on the west side of the state tended to vote more for Romney whereas the untermenschen in the eastern ghettos and banlieuex tended to vote the other way. Obama won with 58% of the statewide vote total, and only 55% of the population has passports.

Sun, 08/10/2014 - 01:14 | 5071979 good man
good man's picture

My last pay check was $9500 working 12 hours a week online. My sisters friend has been averaging 15k for months now and she works about 20 hours a week. I can't believe how easy it was once I tried it out. This is what I do... http://goo.gl/bhiamE

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!