This Is The Chinese Firm Whose Cameras Took Down The Internet On Friday

Tyler Durden's picture

Last Friday many Americans woke up to extremely slow or nonexistent internet services after a cyber attack "of unknown origin" on DNS service provider DYN took down much of the internet in the North East.  As the day wore on, the attack spread across the country taking out numerous large websites including Twitter, Spotify, Reddit, eBay and the New York Times (we wrote about it here:  "DNS Cyber Attack Returns As Northeast Internet Traffic Grinds To A Crawl For Second Time").

Some immediately accused Putin of taking down the US internet in retaliation for accusations of cyber attacks on the Democratic party and Hillary Clinton, although there was no official statement from the US.

Now, while the origin of the attack is still unknown (even though we're sure that Hillary's "17 intelligence agencies" have their suspicions), we're getting a better idea of how the attack was executed.  According to Bloomberg, Internet-connected CCTV cameras made by a Chinese firm, Hangzhou Xiongmai Technology Co., were infected with malware that allowed hackers to takeover "tens of millions" of devices to launch the distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks.

A Chinese security camera maker said its products were used to launch a cyber-attack that severed internet access for millions of users, highlighting the threat posed by the global proliferation of connected devices.

 

The attackers hijacked CCTV cameras made by Hangzhou Xiongmai Technology Co. using malware known as Mirai, the company said in an e-mailed statement. While Xiongmai didn’t say how many of its products had been infiltrated, all cameras made before September 2015 were potentially vulnerable.

 

The attack, which took down sites including Twitter, Spotify and CNN for long stretches, underscored how hackers can marshal an increasing number of online gadgets, collectively known as the Internet of Things, to disrupt the internet on an unprecedented scale.

 

“Mirai is a huge disaster for the Internet of Things. XM have to admit that our products also suffered from hacker’s break-in and illegal use," Xiongmai said in its e-mail.

 

Security professionals have anticipated an increase in attacks from malware that target connected gadgets. In Friday’s instance, hackers launched a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack using tens of millions of malware-infected devices connected to the internet, according to Kyle York, Dyn’s chief strategy officer.

Seems the "internet of things" has it's downsides.

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AlaricBalth's picture

Smile. You are on smart phone candid camera. Always.

Muddy1's picture

And will Chineese made tings fail when America's security is at stake?

Bokkenrijder's picture

I have a ("made in China") Foscam IP cam for my holiday home, and that thing also went haywire over the weekend.

gmrpeabody's picture

Those holiday home camaras are designed and programmed to crawl into your holiday bedroom at night and record anything of interest. Best warn Mrs. Bokkenrijder...

whatamaroon's picture

They won't find shit in my house!, Oh wait let me close youporn first.

NoDebt's picture

The Internet of insecure things.

Can't wait till our self-driving cars are all on the internet.  

a Smudge by any other name's picture

My coffee maker just started speweing out hot and sour soup, Siri is speaking with a Mandarin accent and my smoke alarms keep shouting "Chinese fire drill". Please help!

Joe Davola's picture

I'm sure all the cameras made after 2015 are totally secure and invulnerable, like everything else attached to the internet.  Maybe we should re-think and give Algore credit for inventing totally insecure big brother, because only a dufus of his proportion could conjur up such a clusterwagon.

Manthong's picture

..hmm…. smart guys will be bailing out of the NSA interweb soon and also out of the  .gov  banking system…. Then freedom like the founders envisioned will start to come back.

Joe Davola's picture

Your point is well made, but where are they going to bail to?

Slomotrainwreck's picture

We welcome the new world of IOT.

A world where anyone can hack anything. Including doorbells, (idiot) Home security  and pacemakers.

TeamDepends's picture

All your intuhnet are belong to us.

a Smudge by any other name's picture

cud i borrow sum of yer internet 2 get started?

SWRichmond's picture

If it runs code or has an operating system it can be hacked.

If it has a public IP address, or if it can be reached from a device which has one, it can be hacked remotely.

Any questions?

BandGap's picture

"They" can hack cars. Think about it. And people with internet based security for their cars, or OnStar types of communication, are wholly open to being hacked.

I had a 2006 Volvo S-40 with a main computer and 5 ancillary control units. I am quite sure things have progressed from there.

DjangoCat's picture

I have a 12 year old RAV 4.  Pretty safe, I think.  Buy cheap, buy old!  

sgt_doom's picture

Hmmmmmmmm . . . . . I'm beginning to have some interesting ideas about introducing malware into remote-controlled vibrating panties!

old naughty's picture

b,b,but do we know who are these "smart guys" who wrote the Moirai malware?

Manthong's picture

I have installed  thousands of cameras,

None of them are vulverable to the PTB/Outsiders.

 

Crash Overide's picture

Think of how many cheap electronics say "Made in China"... then scale it up.

 

Manthong's picture

.

..the good and the bad…..

You can see things cheaply today that you could not possibly do ten years or so ago…..

The bad thing is that every move you make is now part of government database.

.

DjangoCat's picture

Keep moving and crash the system.

Raymond K Hessel's picture

I know you're being sarcastic but if that were to really happen to me, I'd laugh like Tom Hanks in the Money Pit.

BabaLooey's picture

Grab the closest hammer and start bashing.

You'll feel better.

Use an American made broom to sweep up the filth.

Dump on the nearest Cankles/Eyebrows bumper stickered car (if you can find one)

Erek's picture

Make sure the hammer is American made, too.

If you don't have one, use an American rock taken from your American yard.

Tall Tom's picture

 

 

 

 

A rock???  I'd expect that....from a five year old.

 

I understand that you, like most of Americans, are so totally useless that you cannot forge one yourself.

 

That is why you depend upon the Chinese crap in the first place. Nobody taught you any practival metalsmithing skills and you are just too damned lazy to learn it on your own.

 

The non industrious are headed toward extinction in the oncoming collapse.

 

Paper shufflers and Keyboard button punchers will just end up dying first.

Erek's picture

Well, I would say that you are about as useful as a tit on a fish.

Don't tell me what I know, asshole. Who the fuck are you anyway? The village smith, or the village idiot. I would say the latter.

I am totally self-sufficient, and don't need the likes of your sorry ass in my A.O.

You're not even sure that I live in the good ol' USA.

When you are hiding your scared ass in mommy's basement trying to live on stale beans and other moldy shit, the rest of the real world will be rebuilding.

 

Like you say in your bio - you don't have a clue.

 

Dumbass!

Agent P's picture

My Siri doesn't speak in Chinese, but I think she listens in it....either that or the bitch is just deaf and/or dumb. 

glenlloyd's picture

Again...I'm sure Hitlery wants everyone to think Putin was involved.

These kinds of things will always be around, the best thing to do is to minimize reliance on any one thing and for some things, like cameras, you should limit them to non-internet connected networks.

sgt_doom's picture

You absolutely certain she doesn't listen in????

Try this test, say:

Ning-gon-daw-wa-buchee!

And watch how she responds . . . .

JohninMK's picture

Just a warning by someone who does not want a cashless society. I think we could name a few of those.

No cash and no Internet = no shops/petrol stations/etc etc

 

Mountainview's picture

All your electronics are "Made in China", so watch out.

alphawolf's picture

Can't wait till our self-driving cars are all controlled by Skynet.  

GreatUncle's picture

Driven over the cliff, you don't get pushed no more.

hxc's picture

What a sick world we inhabit.

Latitude25's picture

Stock up on 22lr for the cheap solution to the IOT.  Target practice time.

Mr.BlingBling's picture

Practice on those damn speed cameras--connected or not.  Why the fuck should we get fined for not driving 25 mph in a school zone AT 10 PM?!?!?

zeronetwork's picture

How about Chinese sneakers? When these sneakers malfunctioned (supply) America will be walking barefoot.

HenryKissingerChurchill's picture

I have a ("made in China") Foscam IP cam for my holiday home, and that thing also went haywire over the weekend.

chinese IT companies share slave programmers and code

hence the security holes must be in a gazillion of cameras

Proofreder's picture

'tis true, unfortunately;

On almost all Chinese - manufactured webcams, the motherboard (all on one large-scale chip) produced by the millions, is set to USERNAME /password   as: admin /(null)  Admin /admin or admin/12345.

The vast majority of buyers and users of these devices do not care or do not know enough to change the Uname and passwd on ALL devices as well as close all external ports on a router / firewall.  Just doesn't happen.

Wifi itself is becoming more secure with lengthly strong passwords in recent experience.

hxc's picture

Wifi is, slowly but surely, getting better encryption and signal strength and such as well. "Simple" Wpa2 is legitimate as fuck and goes with what you just said. Directional signals and shit. Love American innovation

espirit's picture

What's missing in the heat map in article is the role MS Redmond was involved. Seems there's at least a major 3-way attack going on in the US.

 

Also what's missing? Russian involvement. Interesting question - Why Qatar?

Be patient, realtime attack map will load. http://map.norsecorp.com/

More Ammo's picture

I could never get it to load on Friday.  MS is one of the major attachers ever day, just watch the scrolling attack log for a while...

Erek's picture

Well. Ho Li Fuk and Suk Mi Dong, U Wan Dumfuk when buy camera from chinese billionaire Ca Ching.

SAE 73's picture

Funny shit Erek. Got me laughing early out here in the desert. But WTF happened to the Russian's interfering in every thing that our Country don't have an answer for? Queen Hillary has to pull out all the stops to get her Criminal ass in the WH. Want to bet that the Dem's will some how tie Trump and Putin into this huge internet take down? 

Erek's picture

I find it really bullshit that whenever the Americans take to the whim of accusing the Russians of, say, human rights violations, just about all the western countries want to slap more sanctions on Russia, even though none of the accusations can be proven true. But on the other hand, the US .gov has commited untold war crimes and other human rights violations which can / have been proven, but there is no outcry and demands for sanctions.

 

What have Putin and the Russians done that is so damn bad in comparison to the war crimes of the US? (see Libya, drone murder, etc...)

Al Armed's picture

Nothing. But when you are beating a war drum you aren't concerned about being hypocritical.