"Great Disaster" Looms as Technology Disrupts White Collar Workers

GoldCore's picture

David McWilliams: Great Disaster Looms as Technology Disrupts White Collar Workers

- Every era, every century, every generation has its massive technological disruption
- Taxi drivers being "disrupted" by technology of Uber
- History shows how "middle men" frequently made redundant
- Skill set of many professionals today can be replicated by machines and technology
- Technology may make lawyers, accountants, architects and doctors redundant
- We risk "cannabalising ourselves" with internet and emerging technologies

Jean-Luc Picard "assimilated" by the Borg in Star Trek

Looking out to sea at the huge winter waves crashing upon the Cape Town shore, it’s hard to imagine what the first local tribesman thought when he saw, in the distance, Vasco De Gama’s tiny Portuguese ship sail round the Cape of Good Hope, heading out towards the Indian Ocean in search of profit.

You wonder what went through the local’s mind? Could he have imagined the calamity that was soon to befall his people and most of the peoples of Africa?

Once the Portuguese had opened up the passage to India via the Atlantic, the old Silk Roads, the commercial superhighways of the medieval ages from China to Istanbul, were gradually downgraded in global commerce. Economically, the Earth shifted on its axis from Asia to the Atlantic. This was the great disruption.

It took a while, but the commercial earthquake triggered by the Portuguese heading around Africa in 1497 and sailing triumphantly into the port of Calcutta in India is impossible to understate. So much changed, from slavery to mass manufacturing, from the conversion of England’s peasants to proletarian workers and, more traumatically, the mass expropriation of native lands, stemmed from the commercial imperative to trade as much stuff as possible in as many countries as possible.

It was the beginning of European domination of the world.

In 1497, India was the richest, most commercially sophisticated economy in the world. As Sven Beckert explains in ‘Empire of Cotton’ (well worth a summer read), India’s main produce was cotton and it was one of the most sought after manufacturing products in the world. Cotton was fine, soft, fashionable and durable unlike the smelly, heavy wool that Europeans were used to wearing.

Cotton came from India and before the Portuguese opened the Atlantic route, various middlemen held European consumers in ransom. At every stage margin was added, starting with getting the cotton across the Indian Ocean, then the camel transporters in the Arabian desert took a margin, then the Ottoman merchants charged to get the material across the Mediterranean to Italy and then naturally, the Italians took their cut.

These guys were yesterday’s middlemen.

The fees that cotton generated for these middlemen kept generations of Ottoman, Arab and Indian merchants in clover for centuries. The fees were paid in the high price of cotton forked out by the final consumer in Europe. Then overnight the Portuguese transported cotton directly from India around the Cape, cutting out the various Silk Road middlemen.

The price of cotton from India started to fall. The Portuguese made fortunes, even calling this place the Cape of Good Hope because of the riches Indian trade promised. Profits always attract and these fortunes attracted the next two waves of European occupiers to this part of the world. The Dutch arrived soon after the Portuguese and settled here, some becoming the Afrikaaner Tribe. The Afrikanners stayed to farm, but most Dutch adventurers were traders, using Cape Town as an essential port on the long journey from Amsterdam to India and further afield to Indonesia.

Of course Cape Town flourished later under the British, whose demand for Indian cotton to feed the mills in Manchester was so insatiable that they rolled out much of their subsequent Empire to guarantee cotton supplies.

All these massive shifts in economics had one thing in common: they were driven to cut out the middleman.

Cutting out the middleman is, and has always been, one of the major drivers of economic innovation. Whatever the product, profit margins tend to be driven by forcing down costs, making production more efficient and, if possible, maintaining your selling price. This is what capitalism and trade are all about.

The relentless pursuit of profit always identifies the middleman and tries to force him out or lower his take. For the producer, the quickest way from production to sale is the most profitable route. The fewer mouths to feed, the higher the margin — this means eliminating the middleman.

In the old days the technology that eliminated the Asian, Arab and Ottoman middleman was Portuguese, Dutch and later British naval prowess. Every generation has their technology. Today that technology is the Internet.

The only problem is that today we risk cannibalising ourselves.

As was pointed out in this column last week, we are all “middlemen” and if today’s technology is about eliminating the middleman, very soon we end up eliminating ourselves. In a mature service economy with easy credit and rampant consumerism, the middleman is what is normally called the white-collar economy. So everyone who doesn’t actually make something is threatened by new technology that cuts out the middleman.

In a time of the smartphone and companies like Netflix, Airbnb, Amazon and Uber, these might not so much be regarded as fantastic innovations, but could be seen as the enemy for many who could lose their jobs.

Consider London’s famous black taxis. In the old days the London cabbie had to learn “The Knowledge”.

This meant that the cabbie had to train for two years to memorise every nook and cranny of London, every backstreet in every area of that vast city. This effort demanded cabbies renting scooters to head out for months on end, committing the city’s streets to memory. Once he had the knowledge in his head, the cabbie did a rigorous exam and got his taxi license. He also had to buy a special black cab, an expensive vehicle, for which London is famous.

The knowledge was his pricing power; his cab was his unique asset. Because he had the knowledge, he could demand a fare. This was his value added and his price was his margin.

Now consider what has happened with the arrival of Uber. The new Uber driver doesn’t need the knowledge. He has Google maps. He doesn’t need the expensive black cab either. He has a second-hand Toyota. The value of the knowledge is eliminated and the asset is depreciated. In no time the cabbies’ livelihood dwindles.

Uber is doing to the cabbie what the Portuguese did to other middlemen: eliminating them.

Just wait until technology does this to lawyers, accountants, architects and doctors. Whether they like it or not, the skill set of many of these professionals can be replicated accurately by machines. All the above are functional positions and with the exceptions of possibly doctors, few would lose sleep at their passing.

The point is every era, every century, every generation has its massive technological disruption. In the 1980s and 1990s when technology, outsourcing and the relentless drive for profits destroyed working-class manufacturing, the middle classes called it “economic reform”. Now when technology comes after those with white collars and pristine fingernails, what will they call it?

The local tribes in South Africa called it ‘Maafa’ from the Swahili word meaning “the great tragedy”.

 Courtesy of David McWilliams.ie

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CAPT DRAKE's picture

To evaluate any logic, you take it to the extreems on both sides.  

So if we follow the authos's logic, soon, nobody in the white collar world will be doing anything.  

Having just retired after 40 years in electriciy generation and distribution engineering, and seeing the advances in technology I would say the author is correct.

 We now operate huge power complexes with 30 total people (Includes maint. staff.) and only bring in additional people for outages and repairs.   Plans for large distribution systems are designed by a few engineers with the help of AI.  Maybe 10% of the personnel remain in the engineering department.  

Those wind farms?  Completely automatic, not one person involved in the switching decisions, all controlled by AI.  I call it AI because there are so many variables at play, that the computer shows near intuitive response to changing conditions.  

Having seen this advance first hand, there is NO reason that it will not move into medicine, law, and anything else where people are working within a process.  

CRM114's picture

I would argue that there are several reasons.

The process you work with has parameters which are relatively easily measured, which does not involve human variability within the process, and where stopping the process is a viable option. None of those apply to medicine, the law, aviation, and a host of other processes.

CRM114's picture

Bollocks - the loss of the middle class has got very little to do with technology.

It's all about the outlawing of judgement.

AI is nowhere good enough to replace the judgement of experienced professionals (note small 's').

However, they are being elimated en masse because cheap labor is less likely to argue with management (especially crap management), and of course cheaper.

The consequences are loss of efficiency, which is why productivity is dropping rapidly, increased occurence of disasters (e.g. Grenfell tower recently, AF447, etc), and loss of flexibility ("computer says no").

Pernicious Gold Phallusy's picture

People argue professionals like accountants, attorneys, architects and physicians can't be replaced by AI because real life is so complex, and AI won't yield quality outcomes. The argument goes the public won't accept this.

I would argue the problem has already been solved, by convincing people to accept crap everywhere in their lives. Or there is the old Microsoft approach - buy this milk that expires tomorrow and we'll throw in some moldy apples.

 

CRM114's picture

I agree with your main argument, but people are obliged to accept crap due to cartels eliminating competition. People are not convinced, but have no choice.

Hikikomori's picture

Anyone remember, back around 2000, when we were told computers would give us the "paperless office"?

Duc888's picture

 

 

Yup, I also remember all the fucking smug white collar workers telling blue collar people to get "retrained" and that it was "too damned bad your buggy -whip making job" got shipped overseas.

Welllll noooowwwwwww, Howzit feel?

lumen ex lumine's picture

"Cotton was fine, soft, fashionable and durable unlike the smelly, heavy wool that Europeans were used to wearing."

LOL. What you don't know about wool is a lot. Unlike cotton, wool can actually keep you warm. If cotton gets wet, it has basically no insulating properties whatsoever, unlike wet wool. And wool is in fact incredibly durable.

From Wikipedia: "In the North American fur trade, wool blankets were one of the main European items sought by native peoples in exchange for beaver pelts, buffalo robes, pemmican, moccasins, and other trade goods."

Mile High Perv's picture

Not to be pedantic ... but there are a few discrepancies in the article above ..

1) Vasco da Gama landed in Calicut, not Calcutta (yuuuuge difference)

2) The primary initial trade was in spices, not cotton. Cotton only picked up after colonization by the British.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasco_da_Gama

gdpetti's picture

Expropriation.... liked that word choice... traumatic is was/is... but to use that word, devoid of emotion, seems intentionally done to keep our eyes off the truth of the situation... assuming the author knows what that is.... but he chooses to focus only on the economic issue, same with all govt economists... which, intentionally done or not, keeps our eyes off the prize of self-awareness... the key of life's locks on our understanding.

Those middlemen throughout Asia might have had other issues to deal with, like all those conquering tribes from the Mongols to the Turks, to the Arabs to the Europeans.... formly known as Aryan/Semites/Kantekkians etc.. depending upon all many eons back in time you want to go... how many cycles of civilization and nature you can gather any data on... as most of it gets burned or destroyed in the catalyst of the transitions between each cycle and civilization... which is why these 'tribes' remain on the move... same as we will be rather soon... give or take a few years.

This 'expropriation' is currently known as 'genocide'.... little different, is it not than simply economic? Those various conquering peoples weren't spiritual in the sense of the light, but of the darkness, thus their 'thirst' that any amount of raping and pillaging cannot quench.... the current types are the same... not Moslem, but anti-Moslem... the conquistadors, not Christian, but anti-Christian... of a Church always full of pedophiles and psychopaths which serve the state well... they quickly realize how the game is played and have not qualms about the means of getting what they want.

https://www.sott.net/article/319725-The-colonization-of-America-was-geno...

https://www.sott.net/article/267451-Columbus-and-the-Indians-By-Howard-Zinn

Does this author really think that Silk Road couldn't have functioned in competition with those ship routes around the world? Isn't this the reason China is seeking to restart those routes across Asia? Methinks this author is being a wee bit disingenious, or ignorant.... the latter is helpful when doing the work of the empire.

DemandSider's picture

Finance, insurance, real estate, what classical economist Michael Hudson calls, The FIRE sectors, have always been parasitic to the real, wealth generating sectors of the economy. Post Vietnam, due to our over valued currency, these sectors need even less value added wealth in The U.S. than before. So, we've been trained to completely ignore our 30 straight trade deficts, and focus on what The Fed does, which serves to show how captive to the parasitic financial sector we've become. Just a few years ago, I'd heard around 40% of corporate profits were made by the financial sector, while in the 1960's it was something like 5%. Bottom line, elimination of parasitic drains on a normal, well run, trade surplus economy like Communist China, Japan, or Germany, would help productivity, but the U.S. has not been a profitable economy since 1986, so it really doesn't matter all that much. Elimination of horses created a net increase in productivity, free time, and health of the value adding middle class, but the elimination of bank tellers, for example, in the highly financialized U.S. of 2017 just leads to greater consolidation of wealth to the most sociopath parasites.

CRM114's picture

GOOD finance, insurance and real estate are and always have been valuable. However, the problem is the level of legal regulations which REQUIRE one to use these services even when one might not otherwise do so. This has led to the parasites you describe.

milo_hoffman's picture

>Uber

Which only exists because they currently can get away with not paying their drivers enough to even cover the cost of their time, fuel, and wear/tear on the vechicle.

Eventually people will figure out you usually lose money when you drive for Uber.

U4 eee aaa's picture

I notice people always bypass teachers. The internet should already have replaced teachers by now. This just goes to show how powerful teachers unions are regarding credentials

CRM114's picture

You are right about teaching unions and credentials, but it does not follow that the internet can replace teachers, only that it may be an alternative to poor teachers who possess the dictated credentials.

There are many good teachers, credentialled and not, who cannot be replaced by the internet, as the internet does not have the ability to interact with the student.

MaxThrust's picture

"The internet should already have replaced teachers by now"

I don't learn in a classroom. I need total quiet and a focused mind. Once I reach a state of not understanding something, I can't continue until I have understood that new idea. The "talk and chalk" method I was subjected to as a kid failled me miserably.

I eventuallly succeeded in life because much of my chosen vocation had self study books.

Teachers can play and important roll where a student becomes stuck on a problem and needs futher explanation.

yellowsub's picture

Are they powerful or the parents stupid?  

Regardless, the parents need a daycare for their children to keep their sanity...

 

factorypreset's picture

When is the last time you completed a course on line?  If you could pull your children out of school would YOU be the one ensuring they complete their course work? Will YOU be the one determining what your 5 year old should learn or will you leave it up to your 5 year old? 

Did you even think past your statement beyond just wanting to bash teacher unions?  

BTW I'm not a teacher nor am I a fan of unions. My friend who is a teacher works easily70-80 hours a week and gets paid 1/2 what she would earn in the private sector.  Alot of her time is dealing with asshole parents who can't discipline their children to study and behave.   

Not all teachers are lazy and corrupt.  Many teachers really want to teach. 

SunRise's picture

So are you saying that the robot teachers will have broom handles?

FoggyWorld's picture

"Many" may just be overstating your case.

gdpetti's picture

Educators aren't 'teachers'.... not the real kind, most of our educators, which include all the management types that have ballooned in the past couple of decades aka NOT TEACHERS! - all of them are mostly machines themselves, thus the reason we think we can get rid of them... for most of them are a waste of time for those capable of 'teaching' themselves.... but having a real teacher/sensei/master etc is a completely different thing entirely... having someone show you the ropes, explain WTF is going on... this can completely change the game... you still have to experience it for yourself, but imagine getting a heads-up beforehand on all the shit that we call 'civilization'? Those are teachers... not the propaganda sheep leading sheep that our system pumps out... most anyone means well, but few it is that actually do just that..... 'they know not what they do'.

All Risk No Reward's picture

You'll find out how "limp" the teachers' unions are when it comes to the Debt-Money Monopolists looting teacher pension funds...

I bet major teacher union players attend meetings such as Bilderberg...

The Traitor Is, Indeed, the Plague...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-uSA1o07jx0

All Risk No Reward's picture

Teachers' Unions aren't powerful, they only appear to be powerful.

The real usefulness of the schooling system is that it is a massive SOCIETAL DEBT-GENERATION MACHINE that also acts as a SOCIETAL CONTROL MECHANISM.

Appeal to authority logical fallacy and appeal to popularity logical fallacy are the two main "products" of modern Rockefeller schooling.

That's why people know so little and are simply incapable of learning the important things in life... like...

Resources:

"The issue which has swept down the centuries and which will have to be fought sooner or later is the people versus the banks."
~Lord Acton

"Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely."
~Lord Acton

How To Be a Crook
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2oHbwdNcHbc

Poverty - Debt Is Not a Choice
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7BTTB4tiEU

Renaissance 2.0 The Rise of [Debt-Money Monopolist] Financial Empire
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96c2wXcNA7A

Debunking Money
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iBSBVew-3Y

Krugman (and each MIT economist professor - THEY KNOW AND THEY OCCULT!) is a Goebbelsian propagandist as he covers the crimes of wolves with his fake sheep suit and lisp.

Krugman to Lietaer: "Never touch the money system!"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6nL9elK0EY

And don't think Steve Keen is any better. He was called to the carpet for not admitting the system is a fraud when it was explained EXACTLY HOW THAT FRAUD WORKED... and he tucked tail and ran away PRETENDING he was responsive...

The Principal And Interest On Debt Myth (technically correct, but practically reveals inherent fraud as exposed CLEARLY in the comments section)
https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevekeen/2015/03/30/the-principal-and-inte...

Bottom line - Steve Keen won't "touch the money system" either. He learned well from his Debt-Money Monopolist Overlords.

30 sheckels of silver over THE TRUTH.

"The best way to control the opposition is to lead it and/or finance it."
~Yours truly, based upon Vladimir Lenin's quote

"If all the bank loans were paid, no one could have a bank deposit, and there would not be a dollar of coin or currency in circulation. This is a staggering thought. We are completely dependent on the commercial Banks. Someone has to borrow every dollar we have in circulation, cash or credit. If the Banks create ample synthetic money we are prosperous; if not, we starve. We are absolutely without a permanent money system. When one gets a complete grasp of the picture, the tragic absurdity of our hopeless position is almost incredible, but there it is. It is the most important subject intelligent persons can investigate and reflect upon. It is so important that our present civilization may collapse unless it becomes widely understood and the defects remedied very soon."
by: Robert Hemphill, Credit Manager of Federal Reserve Bank, Atlanta, Ga.
Source: In the foreword to a book by Irving Fisher, entitled 100% Money (1935)

June 12 1776's picture

Good stuff! The Olde World Order, King's Monetary theory fraud has been conquering and transferring wealth out of societies, nation/States for centuries...maybe one day the slaves will say no more.

Anon2017's picture

How many old line stock broker firms survived the deregulation of stock exchange commissions in 1975? Very few. Even Merrill Lynch had to be rescued. I am glad I could take early retirement. Stay away from free lunches and free dinners sponsored by "financial planners" and "wealth managers" unless you are interested in high commission (for the sales person) annuities.  

Sandmann's picture

Uber is a Minicab service. Frankly I would always prefer a Black Cab in London, The Knowledge is more than learning a map. It is to know every short cut, road repair, and to have an intimate knowledge unlike reading a map. Google maps are a joke - most GPS is a joke in a city like London.

CRM114's picture

Since my brother IS a Black Cab driver, I can confirm this. His business has not been affected in the least by Uber, as he provides a service which any untrained driver with a gps cannot.

 

He also does tours ;)

Bastiat's picture

Replace lawyers?  Perhaps for simple tasks but machines can't deal well with the ambiguities and nuance of language.  They won't be writing laws and complex contracts and they won't be interpreting them.

SurlysonofaBitch's picture

90% of what those scum-bags do is boiler plate.

CRM114's picture

You are both right.

AI can easily replace bad lawyers.

Dave Thomas's picture

Lexical analysis is what computers can do very well, the lawyers should be the first to go.

Buck Johnson's picture

It's getting crazy.

 

aliens is here's picture

No sympathy here. Let them have a taste of what blue collar workers medicine they have been having for years.

RafterManFMJ's picture

Absolutely. I'm salivating to crucify these shit balls on a cross of iron.

Duc888's picture

 

Uber is doing to the cabbie what the Portuguese did to other middlemen: eliminating them.

Not for long.

Semi-employed White Guy's picture

Cotton came from India and before the Portuguese opened the Atlantic route, various middlemen held European consumers in ransom. At every stage margin was added, starting with getting the cotton across the Indian Ocean, then the camel transporters in the Arabian desert took a margin, then the Ottoman merchants charged to get the material across the Mediterranean to Italy and then naturally, the Italians took their cut.

These guys were yesterday’s middlemen.

Wrong!  They provided valuable services transporting goods over hostile terrain and oceans. This required special skills, knowledge and gear.  They were not useless middlemen.  For real examples of middlemen, and completely useless ones at that, look at real estate agents (actually worse than useless), real estate appraisers (which just enter data into appraisal software),  and title search companies (why in the hell do we still have these fucks!).  All of these are parasites who add no value to a real estate transaction.

CRM114's picture

I have bought and sold 9 properties, always used good real estate agents, and found them to be worth their fees.

There are a shit-load of useless wankers also ;)

Dick Buttkiss's picture

The author didn't say that "yesterday's middlemen" were "useless," only that later efficiencies (e.g., Portugese shipping) eventually rendered them unnecessary, thus reducing prices and expanding markets.

The same with today's real estate agents and many other jobs, as "disintermediation" — http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amit-bhaiya/the-new-disintermediation_b_14... —becomes the norm.

All Risk No Reward's picture

Debt-Money Monopolists are the epitome of useless middle wo/men.

Resources:

"The issue which has swept down the centuries and which will have to be fought sooner or later is the people versus the banks."
~Lord Acton

"Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely."
~Lord Acton

How To Be a Crook
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2oHbwdNcHbc

Poverty - Debt Is Not a Choice
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7BTTB4tiEU

Renaissance 2.0 The Rise of [Debt-Money Monopolist] Financial Empire
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96c2wXcNA7A

Debunking Money
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iBSBVew-3Y

Krugman (and each MIT economist professor - THEY KNOW AND THEY OCCULT!) is a Goebbelsian propagandist as he covers the crimes of wolves with his fake sheep suit and lisp.

Krugman to Lietaer: "Never touch the money system!"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6nL9elK0EY

And don't think Steve Keen is any better. He was called to the carpet for not admitting the system is a fraud when it was explained EXACTLY HOW THAT FRAUD WORKED... and he tucked tail and ran away PRETENDING he was responsive...

The Principal And Interest On Debt Myth (technically correct, but practically reveals inherent fraud as exposed CLEARLY in the comments section)
https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevekeen/2015/03/30/the-principal-and-inte...

Bottom line - Steve Keen won't "touch the money system" either. He learned well from his Debt-Money Monopolist Overlords.

30 sheckels of silver over THE TRUTH.

"The best way to control the opposition is to lead it and/or finance it."
~Yours truly, based upon Vladimir Lenin's quote

"If all the bank loans were paid, no one could have a bank deposit, and there would not be a dollar of coin or currency in circulation. This is a staggering thought. We are completely dependent on the commercial Banks. Someone has to borrow every dollar we have in circulation, cash or credit. If the Banks create ample synthetic money we are prosperous; if not, we starve. We are absolutely without a permanent money system. When one gets a complete grasp of the picture, the tragic absurdity of our hopeless position is almost incredible, but there it is. It is the most important subject intelligent persons can investigate and reflect upon. It is so important that our present civilization may collapse unless it becomes widely understood and the defects remedied very soon."
by: Robert Hemphill, Credit Manager of Federal Reserve Bank, Atlanta, Ga.
Source: In the foreword to a book by Irving Fisher, entitled 100% Money (1935)

lasvegaspersona's picture

As a physician I can already see my replacement. The tele-med service has already started telling some of my patients what to do.

All these physician replacements assume medical judgment can be performed by AI...it can't, not even close at this point.

The systems rely upon self reporting of symptoms and even signs.....a very low probability effort.

The physical exam is often skipped by my younger colleagues....they must be better than me because I still need it to be right. Maybe this kind of doctor can be replaced by the electric eye.

We will be sold a computer driven system. It will cost less. It will be quicker. ...but it will suck.

how_this_stuff_works's picture

"The physical exam is often skipped by my younger colleagues...."

In one generation many physicians have lost the art of medicine. I used to work in healthcare and watched as physicians performed surgeries where their hands told them as much, if not more, than their eyes did.

I believe medicine will, out of necessity, rely more upon AI, but there is no substitute for experience.

CRM114's picture

Ditto from the aviation world.

Fly with crap aircrew and the merest glich in the automatics and a cockpit full of bozos will kill you. AF447.

MaxThrust's picture

I live in asia. Had neck pain for 5 years. eventually I saw a doctor about it. In fact I ended up seeing four doctors and it was only the last one I visited that suggest a Cervical X-ray which identified compression of the neck and pressure on a nerve.

The moral of this story is that not even real doctors can get the diagnosis correct sometimes. "AI" not a chance.

All Risk No Reward's picture

The current Rockefeller Medicine "sick management" system already sucks... to the tune of trillions of dollars of profits.

More illness = more profits.

Big Pharma finances / controls medical school, hence, every disease has a Big Pharma product to "manage" the disease.

Modern chronic disease medicine is a massive hoax.

The cholesterol and calorie hypotheses are both dead — it is time to focus on the real culprit: insulin resistance
http://www.pharmaceutical-journal.com/20203046.article?clearcache=1

Ouch, you doctors were completely duped into giving people advice that made them sicker and caused them to die earlier - and none of that advice was scientific.

It was psyentific - and the average doctor lacked the intellectual self-defense to fend off the Big Pharma lies.

Real wellness is a very broad subject, but suffice it to say that the advice from Big Pharma is almost always wrong in order to promote disease and profits.

Here's one example:

Doctors are trained to test for storage levels of vitamin D and, based on the storage level of vitamin D, declare whether a person is vitamin D deficient.

They aren't trained to check the active level of vitamin D.

You know, the actual vitamin D that is active in the body.

That's like a mechanic opening your trunk, counting the number of oil quarts in the trunk, and then determining how much oil to add to the engine based on the amount of oil in the trunk.

Read that good analogy again.

And again.

And again.

And again.

The truth is there is evidence THAT HIGH ACTIVE D LEVELS RESULT IN LOW STORAGE D LEVELS (WHICH MAKES PERFECT SENSE!).

MECFS Alert Episode 45: Interview with Dr. Kenny De Meirleir, Part 4 (5m 10s in)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8DtUnY7gEM&t=5m10s

Why is vitamin (really a hormone) D important? Because it turbocharges calcium... which is also promoted by the Debt-Money Monopolists.

Disease levels skyrocket when the Banksters can dupe doctors into supplementing calcium, turbocharging it with hormone D, and depositing calcium in everyone's soft tissues.

If you want to begin to focus on wellness then you will need to exit the Debt-Money Monopolist counterfeit medical system.

Some good resources include:

Calcium Lie II - What Your Doctor Doesn't Know Could Kill You
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TV-36i2nmx4

Death by Calcium -- Proof of the Toxic Effects of Dairy and Calcium Supplements- Tom Levy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwi9iZvudXA

Excessive (and turbocharged) calcium is antagonistic to magnesium, which is probably the most important mineral in the body with 3,751 different binding sites found in the human body (2nd place is copper with about 300... so 12x second place... and magnesium is required to make copper bioavailable).

Researchers don't call it Mg2+ATP for no reason... magnesium is critical for cellular energy production.

???? Why We're All Magnesium Deficient - Top Signs & What To Do | Dr Carolyn Dean | Magnesium Miracle
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdnBj_Cm-fI

GotMag.org

#103 Rethinking Vitamin D with Morley Robbins
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zAB0pNdFQLQ

Live to 110 Podcast #162 Rethinking Iron Supplementation with Morley Robbins
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrPbAXCNitY

Live to 110 Podcast #90 Most Health Issues Stem from Copper Dysregulation PART 1 with Morley Robbins
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ga9QQyxSRK4

Live to 110 Podcast #91 Copper Dysregulation Part 2 with Morley Robbins
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fv1bDqfU7Pg

True doctors are optimizing enzyme activity through the use of nutritional balancing.

BlueGreen's picture

As I hear you say that, all I can picture is everyone on disability....

DemandSider's picture

Fortunately for health care professionals and pharmaceutical companies, the health industry has very powerful lobbyists, because, with the cost of surgery and medicine being so high relative to the average American's pay, drug imports from Canada and health tourism to Costa Rica, Mexico, etc, should be sky rocketing.

CheapBastard's picture

Read between the lines; Uber is expanding into the medical and legal fields.

DuneCreature's picture

Want to watch a ball-Z disrupter disrupt the Pro Disrupters?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~!.!.!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Holy Macaroni and CheeZe Wiz!

George is going after the JTTF!

George Webb has a pair the size of a shiny little AirStream travel trailer. (About a 12 footer, I forget the model name of that cute little rolling shelter.)

The guy is trying to save the US Constitution single handedly.

Watch this video where he lays out his game plan.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQL_tJTg8ug

Heads up, people! ...... George is going to need a whole bunch of help. ...

Want your country back? ..... Pay attention! This is going to get real.

Live Hard, Wasn't There A 'George The Dragon Slayer' In Some Cool Kid's Fairy Tale?, Die Free

~ DC v7.4

Richard Chesler's picture

"we are all “middlemen”"

Speak for yourlsef much?