Myths About Bitcoin That Must Die

Tyler Durden's picture

Authored by Marcuss via ValueWalk.com,

If you know anyone who spent some time in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s (or if you did), ask him or her about Life cereal, Mikey, and pop rocks.

You may get a look of bewilderment. Or, you may get a knowing chuckle and an “Oh yeah, what happened to him?”

To briefly explain… in a television commercial (back when everyone watched the same half-dozen TV channels), a cute boy named Mikey is urged to try a sugary breakfast cereal concoction called Life. To the amazement of the older doubting Thomases egging him on, Mikey approved of Life, spawning the catchphrase, “He likes it!”

Then – years later – the rumor surfaced that the actor who played Mikey had (after surviving Life cereal) eaten an bag of Pop Rocks candy, which were little candies that snapped and crackled on your tongue, chased by a can of Coca Cola. And, word was, little Mikey’s stomach exploded from the mixture of the two heavily carbonated substances. It was a story that had just the right mix of  gossip, speculation and shock value to take on a life of its own.

Of course, it never happened. (Mikey grew up to become an ad executive.) But it was a good story, and one that destroyed the Pop Rocks industry. (You can read more about Mikey and what actually happened to him here.)

I bring up Mikey because the world of bitcoin is plagued by similiarly silly – and pernicious – rumors and misinformation. But while Mikey/Life cereal/Pop Rocks mythology was (mostly) harmless fun, bitcoin mistruths can cost you money… in the form of big opportunity cost.

The truth is, a lot of what you read about bitcoin and cryptocurrencies is simply wrong. I’ve seen articles in the likes of the Wall Street Journal that are factually incorrect. And now that the bitcoin price has soared above US$5,000 – the media seems determined to  “warn” investors about the dangers of bitcoin.

(With Stansberry Research, we’re going to be holding a webinar on Wednesday night (US EST)/Thursday morning (Asia) that are going to be exploding some of those bitcoin myths… you can learn more about it here.)

So today, I’m debunking bitcoin’s biggest myths to set the record straight…

1. Bitcoin is not real money

The fundamental characteristics an asset must have to be considered money are:

Uniformity: In other words, every “dollar” or bitcoin is the same as the next one. When you’re talking about using seashells or cows as currency, uniformity is hard to achieve.

 

Divisibility: Dollars and bitcoin need to be divisible, broken up into small increments to cover a wide range of value transactions. Cows? Not so much, unless you’re hosting a barbecue.

 

Portability: Your currency must be easy to transfer and store.

 

Durability: Older, agriculturally-based forms of money had a shelf life. Gold is the ultimate when it comes to durability. Paper notes deteriorate.

 

Limited Supply: A currency is worthless if there’s no scarcity to it. In our office here in Hong Kong we have a 500 million dollar note issued by the Zimbabwean government – it’s a simple reminder of what ultimately happens when governments try to endlessly print their way to prosperity.

 

Acceptability: to be considered money, the asset has to be widely accepted. People all over the world will take U.S. dollars. They won’t however take Turkish lira.

Bitcoin holds all of these characteristics with the exception of acceptability – although that is rapidly changing. Japan passed a law earlier this year that made bitcoin acceptable as legal tender.

And the digital element of bitcoin? Well,  more than 90 percent of all money that exists today around the world is not even physical… it’s purely digital, existing only on computer servers.

2. Bitcoin can be hacked

In certain circles, bitcoin and cryptocurrencies in general are synonymous with hacking – thanks to some high-profile hacks of cryptocurrency exchanges – like Mt. Gox in 2014 or Bithumb in 2017.

In an area so nascent, of course there are hackers looking to exploit individuals’ inexperience, or find technological loopholes. Hackers have always and will always be a risk to ANYTHING where value resides on a computer network.

But bitcoin is one of the most secure assets an individual can own – it’s just that it’s 100 percent up to the individual to secure it themselves.

Cryptocurrency exchanges have been hacked. They are third-party platforms where you have no visibility as to how customers’ digital assets are being secured. That’s why I’ve said repeatedly that you shouldn’t keep large amounts of bitcoin on an exchange because when it’s on an exchange you don’t own it, they do.

And when it comes to hacking, you are far, far more at risk from other cybersecurity vulnerabilities – just look at U.S. credit reporting agency Equifax who announced recently that the Social Security numbers along with other personal information of millions of Americans may have been compromised.

That’s a catastrophic breach. And this kind of thing happens all the time. So there’s no use worrying about bitcoin “hacking” when you can take full personal control and accountability for securing it yourself (rather than be at the mercy of an incompetent third party).

3. Bitcoin is used by criminals

“Bitcoin’s core use remains what’s it’s always been: paying for drugs or extortion fees on the Internet.”

That’s a quote from a recent Fortune magazine article.

The suggestion that bitcoin’s core use is for buying drugs and extortion is nothing new – and it’s part of the media’s ongoing narrative. It’s understandable in many respects.

After all, there have been recent ransomware hack/virus attacks that demand users pay a small ransom in bitcoin to unlock their computers.

And who can forget the FBI’s 2013 takedown of Silk Road.

Silk Road was an online marketplace used to sell illegal drugs, dirty pictures, and stolen plastic.

These criminals thought that because bitcoin operated independently of the U.S. government, their activity couldn’t be traced.

But they were proved wrong once the government shut Silk Road down, and made an example of this illegal marketplace.

You see, it turns out bitcoin is nowhere near as anonymous and untraceable as cash.

Bitcoin is pseudonymous. That is to say, a bitcoin address can be tied to a particular user. You may not know who that user is, but that user has an identity. Think of it like a username on a website. You may not know who’s behind it, but that username is tied to a particular person – and their actions are tied to that username.

The whole point about bitcoin is that it’s actually transparent. Every transaction is recorded on the blockchain and visible to everyone.

In short, just because bitcoin has been the method of payment used by some criminals, it’s definitely not the currency’s core use.

4. Bitcoin is not regulated

A lot of people are worried about bitcoin because the government hasn’t come out with an official policy about how it should be run.

In short, there’s no financial system, like the U.S. Federal Reserve, manging its existence and value. And as a recent Forbes article “warns”, “there is no ‘good faith and credit’ of the government standing behind the currency.”

But think about it… does a government’s romise that something is “money” protect its value?

The U.S. dollar can be printed at will… and only has value because the government says so.

Plus, more regulation on bitcoin is quickly being established. For example, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), which regulates futures and options markets, already approved the creation of options trading around bitcoin.

And the SEC recently came out with a statement hinting that it will soon begin regulating cryptocurrencies.

These moves will only bring additional stability to the bitcoin market, and with it, some new money.

But what about in the rest of the world?

China recently announced a ban on initial coin offerings (ICOs), where companies create and issue cryptocurrencies to the public in exchange for bitcoin or ethereum (the second-largest cryptocurrency).

But China didn’t “ban” bitcoin.  And even if a government did want to ban it, the question is “how”? That cat’s already out of the bag. And bitcoin doesn’t answer to any government.

There is no bitcoin head office, no CEO, no board of directors.

What’s more, there’s no incentive for any major economy to “ban” bitcoin. (Japan, the third-largest economy in the world, made it legal tender.) Any government that does ban it is simply saying “we don’t want innovation, technology jobs, new companies, or enterprise in general”.

Now don’t get me wrong – there is and will be regulation, and there may even be a temporary shutdown of the exchanges.

But regulation is a different story altogether. For example, don’t think for a second that Uncle Sam is going to let you make 10x on a cryptocurrency trade and not pay your “fair share” of tax to the coffers.

5. Bitcoin is too volatile to invest in

Most people look at bitcoin’s daily price changes and write bitcoin off simply because it’s more volatile than your typical blue-chip stock. But these swings are growing smaller, as more and more people move money into bitcoin.

According to investment firm ARK Invest, at the beginning of this year, “bitcoin’s daily volatility was about one-fifth that of five years ago, and 28 percent less than January 1, 2016.”

And this trend should continue, as time goes on… and more money flocks into this sapce.

That said, even with this level of volatility, bitcoin delivered better risk-adjusted returns than stocks, bonds, gold and real estate over the past five years. In fact, over the past year alone, bitcoin performed twice as well as stocks, on a risk-adjusted basis.

I’m not saying bitcoin won’t be volatile. Like any asset, cryptocurrencies will continue to experience rallies and corrections. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking “this time is different” and that bitcoin will go up forever. The cryptocurrency could absolutely be in for a short-term price bubble. But over the long term, the upside is far from over. You just need to proceed carefully. And “invest” no more than you can absolutely afford to lose.

Don’t believe the media hype

As I said earlier, the media doesn’t really understand bitcoin. So what you read in the mainstream media on cryptocurrencies should be taken with a liberal dose of salt.

The truth is, bitcoin is a just a cryptographically scarce and secure medium of exchanging value. It’s not a vehicle for criminals or not a real currency. And bitcoin, and the technology behind it – called the blockchain – is quickly changing the world. And it’s here to stay. Being on the outside (and not understanding it) will limit your ability to profit.

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Crash Overide's picture

Why not diversify?

Harlequin001's picture

'But bitcoin is one of the most secure assets an individual can own – it’s just that it’s 100 percent up to the individual to secure it themselves.'

A bit like gold then, or the dollar in your pocket. Or anything else you can own, that can be taken from you.

Useless article.

SafelyGraze's picture

The fundamental characteristics an asset must have to be considered money are:

1. it is digital

2. it can be forked

3. people talk about it on weblogs

4. it originated from a pseudonym

5. a few strong hands hold most of it

gigadeath's picture

Lets not forget bitcoin's very first transaction in 2010 for "pizza" between Laszlo Hanyecz and Papa Johns for 10,000 BTCs. If that doesnt sound alarm bells, post pizzagate, I dont think anything will.

bamawatson's picture

satoshi is actually david brock

TheLastTrump's picture

That would suck. But I sense you're being facetious, in which case I would remind you, feces is a very similar sounding word with much in common, appearance wise.

runswithscissors's picture

Why not ask the people in Puerto Rico how that bitcoin is working out for them.

tmosley's picture

Why not ask the Venezuelans?

francis scott falseflag's picture

Is it a myth that the Mint is going to strike the BitCoin with an image of Bernie Madoff on it?

inhibi's picture

This article is entirely ironic:

"Bitcoin Can Be Hacked" "Well like it can, but THIS IS STILL A MYTH"

"Bitcoin is volatile" "Well like it did go up and down by $2000 in the span of a week (basically 50%) but THIS IS STILL A MYTH"

"Bitcoin is just used by drug peddler" "Well like one person bought a house (by converting it to dollars - let that sink in) and the rest is drugs and speculation but THIS IS STILL A MYTH"

How laughable.

hestroy's picture

Author probably have some bitcoins and like every good parasite he needs to increase the price.

Mementoil's picture

One of the basic properties of good money is intrinsic value.
Intrinsic value means that the money has some other practical use, other than being a medium of exchange.
Why is that necessary? Because the industrial demand gives its price "a floor". Even if people don't want to use it as money, it's value doesn't go to zero due to the industrial demand.
This property is why gold and silver have been so successful as money over the ages.
Even in times when governments tried to promote paper money, gold and silver never went to zero, and this is why they have gained such a trustworthy reputation as stores of value.

BTC has no use other than as a medium of exchange, and therefore it has no intrinsic value.
In that respect it is similar to the dollar or the Euro.
If for some reason people don't want to use it as money anymore, its price CAN go to zero.

I have recently debated someone who claimed that BTC does have other uses, such as ultra-secure storage of information.
I accept that this is possible, but doubt that the demand for ultra-secure storage is large enough to justify a network which is allegedly worth a 100 billion dollars.

vikingvista's picture

Alternative uses may have been instrumental in gold becoming a money, but the value of a common medium of exchange far outstrips those uses, and is more than sufficient to sustain itself without any "floor". In fact, essentially every money in use today lacks an alternative use. And neither gold nor silver are monies today.

btClunker's picture

Money cannot serve two markets well simultaneously. It's either one or the other. Google why the Romans quenched bronze coins in vineger. Two markets will always lead to monetary instability.  I agreed with the intrinsic thought for a long time. 

Michigander's picture

Actually, a useless comment. Now go beat your car with your buggy whip.

Stuck on Zero's picture

A lot of hogwash above.

The fundamental characteristics an asset must have to be considered money are:

Uniformity: In other words, every “dollar” or bitcoin is the same as the next one. When you’re talking about using seashells or cows as currency, uniformity is hard to achieve. 

Huh? Who said this?


Divisibility: Dollars and bitcoin need to be divisible, broken up into small increments to cover a wide range of value transactions. Cows? Not so much, unless you’re hosting a barbecue.  

Bitcoin cannot be divided down because it incurs perpetual fixed costs no matter the denomination.


Portability: Your currency must be easy to transfer and store. Bitcoin fails here.   

Massive systems of servers and transport infrastructure are required to maintain it.


Durability: Older, agriculturally-based forms of money had a shelf life. Gold is the ultimate when it comes to durability. Paper notes deteriorate.

Yep. And bitcoin only has the durability of the massive IT infrastructure.


Limited Supply: A currency is worthless if there’s no scarcity to it. In our office here in Hong Kong we have a 500 million dollar note issued by the Zimbabwean government – it’s a simple reminder of what ultimately happens when governments try to endlessly print their way to prosperity.

There are an infinite number of possible cryptocurrencies. Where's the scarcity?


Acceptability: to be considered money, the asset has to be widely accepted. People all over the world will take U.S. dollars. They won’t however take Turkish lira.

How many places accept bitcoin?


Missing in this blather about bitcoin is the most valuable property that money can have: consistent value. Bitcoin fails here. How do you operate a business when the currency goes up and down 30% in a day and your margins are 5%?

 

 

 

tmosley's picture

Your cognitive dissonance is showing. 

Implied Violins's picture

You've been displaying yours publicly for months now. Got meds for that?

tmosley's picture

Tell me what the tells are and demonstrate where I have shown them.

Just saying something doesn't make it so. As much as you magically thinking oldbugs wish it were so.

TheLastTrump's picture

Necessity to reply to every post about Bitcoin  using ad hominem remarks repeatedly to combat facts or logic you cannot other wise combat.

 

How'd I do, bitch?

tmosley's picture

I triggered you into a kvetch-fest, so I would say that my victory is complete.

hestroy's picture

Good for you. Now take the pills.

dasein211's picture

Because the dollar losing 99% of its purchasing power displays stability/consistent purchasing power? Please. Bitcoin’s just starting. The Federal Reserve basically destroyed its currency at about a run rate of 1% a year. Bitcoin rises against the dollar because smart people can do their own math. The only people panicking about bitcoin are banks and governments.

Implied Violins's picture

1. I don't trust fiat currencies. We are square there.

2. I don't trust transient electrons trying to represent real wealth, especially when computers and all programs that they run were DESIGNED to allow back-door access by the NSA and every government agency.

3. I have a little gold and silver, some seeds, water filters, guns and ammo, and food. After the coming shitstorm, I merely hope to survive and that I have enough time to figure out where I really need to go from there. At that point, when all things are settled down, THEN I will rethink this bullshit...but, NOT UNTIL THEN.

tmosley's picture

>transient electrons

I think you know that that is a stupid meme. Nobody can hack every node in the world at once. It would take a god, and gods have better things to do, like turning into bulls to fuck young women.

>I merely hope to survive

Hopes do come true. 

kochevnik's picture

So use a Russian computer without Intel inside

TheEndIsNear's picture

The US dollar (Federal Reserve Note) is not money. It is currency.

hestroy's picture

Lol! You are pretty brainwashed.

kochevnik's picture

Do you have something intelligent to write?

stitch-rock's picture

The false metaphor 'tulip' bullshit
seems to show the retards hiding among us.

TheLastTrump's picture

Your lack of a good comeback to an overwhelmingly superior post is showing. Holy shit he smoked you caviar. Have fun shilling your shit at another web site.

 

Honestly, if I were looking at "investing" in Bitcoin, I would say that I turned away from it in large part because of the obvious shilling of dorks like tmosely & others, but mostly tmoseyon.

tmosley's picture

Hahaha, you loved me 30 minutes ago.

Oldwood's picture

"opportunity costs" says it all for me.

I have no doubt that there is money there and we will likely see crypto dominant in our future, but opportunity costs are the definition of speculation.

Tired of it. Simply another symptom of our demise, which undoubtedly make some people very rich.

lickspitler's picture

Mosley you fraud, you hated Bitcoin when it was cheap. You were the massive Gold and Silver stacking evangalist. Calling anyone who mentioned bitcoin a troll  with all the usual "if i cant stoke it it ain't nothin" crap. Look at you now what a dick. At least Fonstar was early and had integrity.

tmosley's picture

I hated Bitcoin when it was cheap?

Then why was I trading it back in 2013? Why did I buy it within a month of the first time I heard about it?

You are thinking about someone else, retard.

lickspitler's picture

Bullshit Mosley  2014 You were all over TF Metals site shitting your pants because Gold was falling out of bed and you had gone hard for it at the top. Same site you shat on anyone who mentioned bitcoin.

2013  yer right  .   What an arseclown 

lickspitler's picture

 

Mosley next you'll be telling us you were the cock who made the Pizza and sold it to a guy

for 10,000 Btc in 2010

You're a fraud cockbreath !

Post Comments

 

"Bitcoin is for losers if you can't stack it fuck it. It's all Bernankes fault

 he's manipulating the COMEX"

                             TMosley March17 2014  TF metals

 

 

tmosley's picture

Post the link you little shit. That isn't my writing style at all, nor was it ever my supposition that it was BERNANKE manipulating the COMEX.

What are you trying to acomplish with this idiocy?

lickspitler's picture

Lick my balls you Bitcoin wannabe. 

Late to the party and now you're trying to convince everyone you were on the organizing committee,

 

 

jimmy c korn's picture

This argument kind of reminds me of Trump. Every time the market hits a new high, he takes credit and tweets out how high its gone. While about this time last year, he was saying sell, a crash is coming. A crash will come, everyone's getting in at the top, and the elite will sell-- time for a shearing. Will Trump take credit then?

When people are heading for the doors, I'd put my money on them buying Precious Metals like usual. Bitcom, not so sure, could be.

Oh yeah, with PM's basicly low right now, good avenue for elite to put there money. Pushes PM's high while market dips. They wait for market to dip, sell their PM's, back to the market they go... cycle starts over.

lickspitler's picture

Mosley used to bag out Fonstar about Bitcoin what a turnaround. That was in your stackin days

tmosley's picture

Actually, I was one of Fonestar's only defenders around here. Back when I liked both PMs and crypto.

JustUsChickensHere's picture

Oh come on .... Gold/Silver (physical) still deserve a percentage allocation in your portfolio even if is only because a lot of the world will never really cope with the idea of crypto's as money.  To trade with those people, you need tokens that they believe in... coins of Gold and Silver ...

Zero_Ledge's picture

Limited supply is the best one.  If BTC is limited, how come it keeps forking?  Oh those, are *different* new currencies. I see.  Well, I'm sure the BTC limit will never change right?  It's "in the code".  Which is why it forks.  Oh wait.

DisorderlyConduct's picture

At one time China held the bulk of mining ops. Just floating it, but if a state actor with a penchant for control decided to use their fiat to build a big enough mining operation, then it's whatever they want it to be.

And of course if you're a miner in China, you are de facto gonna do/vote how you're told - so they don't have to directly own all of them.

Humans do human things and governments can mint value from nothing through their currencies. Till they cant. If they end up owning bitcoin because they bought it, there's nothing to do about it but wish they didnt. Just because it's decentralized does not forbid it becoming centralized by purchase.