Mueller Subpoena Spooks Dollar, Sends European Stocks, US Futures Lower

Tyler Durden's picture

Yesterday's torrid, broad-based rally looked set to continue overnight until early in the Japanese session, when the USD tumbled and dragged down with it the USDJPY, Nikkei, and US futures following a WSJ report that Robert Mueller had issued a subpoena to more than a dozen top Trump administration officials in mid October.

And as traders sit at their desks on Friday, U.S. index futures point to a lower open as European stocks fall, struggling to follow Asian equities higher as the euro strengthened at the end of a tumultuous week. Chinese stocks dropped while Indian shares and the rupee gain on Moody’s upgrade. The MSCI world equity index was up 0.1% on the day, but was heading for a 0.1% fall on the week. The dollar declined against most major peers, while Treasury yields dropped and oil rose. 

Europe's Stoxx 600 Index fluctuated before turning lower as much as 0.3% in brisk volumes, dropping towards the 200-DMA, although about 1% above Wednesday’s intraday low; weakness was observed in retail, mining, utilities sectors. In the past two weeks, the basic resources sector index is down 6%, oil & gas down 5.8%, autos down 4.9%, retail down 3.4%; while real estate is the only sector in green, up 0.1%. The Stoxx 600 is on track to record a weekly loss of 1.3%, adding to last week’s sell-off amid sharp rebound in euro, global equity pullback. The Euro climbed for the first time in three days after ECB President Mario Draghi said he was optimistic for wage growth in the region, although stressed the need for patience, speaking in Frankfurt. European bonds were mixed. The pound pared some of its earlier gains after comments from Brexit Secretary David Davis signaling a continued stand-off in negotiations with the European Union.

In Asia, the Nikkei 225 took its time to catch up to the WSJ report that US Special Counsel Mueller has issued a Subpoena for Russia-related documents from Trump campaign officials, although reports pointing to North Korea conducting 'aggressive' work on the construction of a ballistic missile submarine helped the selloff. The Japanese blue-chip index rose as much as 1.8% in early dealing, but the broad-based dollar retreat led to the index unwinding the bulk of its gains; the index finished the session up 0.2% as the yen jumped to the strongest in four-weeks. Australia’s ASX 200 added 0.2% with IT, healthcare and telecoms leading the way, as utilities lagged. Mainland Chinese stocks fell, with the Shanghai Comp down circa 0.5% as the PBoC’s reversel in liquidity injections (overnight net drain of 10bn yuan) did little to boost risk appetite, as Kweichou Moutai (viewed as a bellwether among Chinese blue chips) fell sharply. This left the index facing its biggest weekly loss in 3 months, while the Hang Seng rallied with IT leading the way higher. Indian stocks and the currency advanced after Moody’s Investors Service raised the nation’s credit rating.

The dollar was pressured even as tax reform moved a step forward given Trump-Russia probe came back into focus. Two-year Treasury yield hit a fresh high and bonds slipped. The euro stayed on course to its best week in two months as Draghi remains bullish on prospects of higher wages; the kiwi hit its lowest level since June 2016.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Treasury yield curve remained on investors’ radar, reaching its flattest levels in a decade, reflecting a belief that the Federal Reserve will continue to raise interest rates.

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a tax overhaul expected to boost share prices if it becomes law. The legislative battle now shifts to the Senate. As Bloomberg notes, as "Washington took one step closer to tax reform and China’s central bank injected the most cash since January into its financial system this week, investors have been trying to decide if resilient global growth and strong earnings forecasts warrant sticking it out in equities. Lofty valuations contributed to fund managers paring back some exposure after global shares reached record highs earlier this month."

As earnings season drew to a close with 90 percent of U.S. and European companies having reported, analysts said results were supportive but weaker than the previous quarters. “While they look good overall, the strong momentum apparent since Q1 is now fading,” said Societe Generale analysts, adding that consensus earnings estimates are no longer being raised for U.S. or euro zone stocks.

As also reported on Thursday, Fed's Williams suggested that central banks should consider unconventional policy tools for use in the future, including higher inflation targets and income targeting. Williams also suggested that negative rates need to be on list of potential tools if the US enters a recession, even as he said that a December hike, followed by 3 hikes in 2018 is perfectly reasonable. "What really matters is gradual normalisation not timing, should raise rates to around 2.5% in the next couple of years" he said adding that "Low inflation in a way is lucky as it allows strong growth, however, if it does not pick up over the next few years he will re-think the rate path."

Oil prices were on track for weekly losses, slipping from two-year highs hit last week on signs that U.S. supply is rising and could potentially undermine OPEC’s efforts to tighten the market. U.S. light crude stood at $55.53 a barrel, up 0.7 percent on the day but still within its trading range in the past couple of days. It was down 2.1 percent on the week. Brent futures hit a two-week low of $61.08 a barrel but last stood 0.3 percent higher at $61.53. It was down 3.1 percent for the week.

Economic data today includes housing starts, building permits.

Market Snapshot

  • S&P 500 futures down 0.1% to 2,583.25
  • STOXX Europe 600 down 0.2% to 384.06
  • MSCI Asia up 0.4% to 170.15
  • MSCI Asia ex Japan up 0.5% to 558.90
  • Nikkei up 0.2% to 22,396.80
  • Topix up 0.1% to 1,763.76
  • Hang Seng Index up 0.6% to 29,199.04
  • Shanghai Composite down 0.5% to 3,382.91
  • Sensex up 0.8% to 33,377.55
  • Australia S&P/ASX 200 up 0.2% to 5,957.25
  • Kospi down 0.03% to 2,533.99
  • German 10Y yield rose 1.1 bps to 0.387%
  • Euro up 0.2% to $1.1795
  • Brent Futures up 0.7% to $61.78/bbl
  • Italian 10Y yield rose 0.2 bps to 1.572%
  • Spanish 10Y yield rose 0.6 bps to 1.548%
  • Brent Futures up 0.7% to $61.78/bbl
  • Gold spot up 0.3% to $1,282.59
  • U.S. Dollar Index down 0.3% to 93.69

Top Overnight News

  • House Republicans pass tax bill, while Senate Finance Committee approves different version
  • Special Counsel Robert Mueller is said to have served President Donald Trump’s election campaign a subpoena in mid-October seeking documents related to Russia contacts
  • ECB President Mario Draghi said he was confident for wage growth in the euro area
  • While U.K. Brexit Secretary David Davis said there would be some clarity on the Britain’s divorce bill with the European Union in a “a few more weeks,” there are signs that talks with EU leaders are in a new stand-off
  • Japanese PM Shinzo Abe says he will push through initiatives to boost productivity and compile a new economic policy package next month
  • Canada is open to a Mexican proposal to review the North American Free Trade Agreement every five years instead of ending the deal automatically if not renegotiated, which the U.S. had demanded, Reuters reports, citing two unidentified government sources
  • Senate Panel Approves Tax Plan as GOP Leaders Gird for Battle
  • Murdoch Has His Pick of Suitors as He Ponders Fox’s Fate; Sky Rises Most Since June on Interest From Comcast, Verizon
  • Chinese Stocks Tumble as State Media Warning Triggers Selloff
  • India’s First Moody’s Upgrade in 14 Years Bets on Reforms
  • Draghi Says Confidence on Inflation Will Help Drive Wage Gains
  • China Issues Draft Rules to Curb Asset Management Product Risks
  • Bitcoin Flirts With Record $8,000 High, Leaving Sell-Off Behind
  • PDVSA Looks Like a ‘Zero’ to Man Who Ran Elliott’s Argentina Bet
  • Manafort Spent Millions on Home Updates But Numbers Don’t Add Up
  • Tesla Seals Order From Michigan Grocery Chain for Semi Trucks
  • Luxoft Holding Second Quarter Adjusted EPS Beats Estimates
  • JPMorgan’s Gu Sees ‘Very Robust’ Pipeline for Hong Kong IPOs

In Asia, the Nikkei 225 took its time to catch up to a report suggesting that US Special Counsel Mueller has issued a Subpoena for Russia-related documents from Trump campaign officials, although reports pointing to North Korea conducting 'aggressive' work on the construction of a ballistic missile submarine probably helped the selloff. The Japanese blue-chip index rose as much as 1.8% in early dealing, but the broad-based dollar retreat led to the index unwinding the bulk of its gains; the index finished the session up 0.2%. Australia’s ASX 200 added 0.2% with IT, healthcare and telecoms leading the way, as utilities lagged. Mainland Chinese stocks fell, with the Shanghai Comp down circa 0.4% as the PBoC’s injections have done little to underscore risk appetite, as Kweichou Moutai (viewed as a bellwether among Chinese blue chips) fell sharply. This left the index facing its biggest weekly loss in 3 months, while  the Hang Seng rallied with IT leading the way higher. The PBoC injected a net CNY 810bln this week, against a net drain of CNY 230bln last week. Japanese PM Abe promised to rid the country of deflation once and for all. He pledged to use all policy tools, including tax reforms and deregulation, to push up wages in order to put an end to the country's persistent deflation he also noted that he wants to increase pressure on North Korea along with the international community. Japanese Finance Minister Aso stated that Japan is to continue to firmly escape deflation. South Korea's FX authority warned that the pace of the KRW's gains has been fast. A BoK official warned that the KRW has appreciated fast in a short time, and reiterates that FX authorities are monitoring the situation. Moody’s raised India's sovereign rating to Baa2 from Baa3, outlook to stable from positive.

Top Asian News

  • India Rating Raised by Moody’s as Reforms Boost Growth Potential
  • China to Rein Risks in Asset Management Industry
  • China Warning Wipes $6 Billion From Stock Loved by Goldman
  • Erdogan Says Turkey Has Withdrawn Troops From NATO Exercise
  • China Stocks Cap Worst Week Since August as Moutai Battered

European bourses trading modestly lower this morning, with downbeat earnings weighing sentiment, while the spill-over from a soft Asian session has dented risk in Europe. Vivendi shares had been lower as much as 2% after a weak earnings update. FTSE 100 slipping slight amid the strength in GBP, which is back above 1.32 against the greenback. Comments from ECB’s Draghi have sparked some additional movement, as while largely sticking to the post-October 26 policy meeting presser he appeared more confident about the growth and inflation outlook (economic activity more self-propelling, underlying inflation to converge with headline etc). Hence, a decline in Bunds below parity to a 162.50 low, but again not yet posing a real threat to more substantial downside targets/supports. Market contacts suggest that 162.48 needs to be breached from an intraday chart perspective to bring Thursday’s 162.38 Eurex base into contention, and recall there are more/bigger stops anticipated below 162.36. On the upside, assuming 162.48 holds, yesterday’s 162.82 session high is the first proper line of resistance. Gilts have also retreated into negative territory alongside Bunds and USTs, to 124.45 vs 124.77 at best and their 124.72 previous settlement.

Top European News

  • We’ll Wait for U.K. Brexit Concessions, EU Leaders Tell May
  • From EON to Fortum: How to Save Nasdaq’s Fading Power Market
  • Carige Talks With Underwriters Continue as Deadline Looms
  • Elior Plunges Most on Record as Hurricane Irma Wrecks Party
  • Norway Idea to Exit Oil Stocks Is ‘Shot Heard Around the World’

In FX, the USD is down again, but off worst levels seen so far this week as the Index holds within a 93.500-93.900 broad range. Some respite for Dollar from progress on the tax reform bill, but another Russian-related probe into Trump’s election campaign has capped the upside. The Euro was underpinned by upbeat comments from ECB President Draghi, and holding close to 1.1800 vs the Usd. Hefty option expiries still in play from 1.1790-1.1800 through 1.18250 and up to 1.1840-50. The Yen regaining a safe-haven bid amid the latest US political challenge against the President, with Usd/Jpy down to new multi-week
lows sub-112.50. AUD/NZD is the biggest G10 losers on broad risk-off sentiment and the recovering Greenback, with Aud/Usd back below 0.7600 and Nzd/Usd even weaker under the 0.6800 handle. Note, cross flow also weakening the Kiwi as Aud/Nzd trades back at 1.1100+ levels.

In commodities, Brent and WTI crude futures trading higher by 0.4% and 1.3% respectively, the latter making a break above yesterday’s at USD 55.59, however has met resistance at the USD 56 handle. Iraq/Kurd oil flow to Ceyhan rises to 254k bpd, according to Port Agent

Looking at the day ahead, a slightly quieter end to the week although the ECB’s Draghi is due to give a keynote address on “Europe into a new era – how to seize the opportunities”. The Bundesbank’s Weidmann is also slated to speak while the Fed’s Williams speaks in the evening. US housing starts for October and the Kansas City Fed’s manufacturing activity index for November are the data highlights.

US Event Calendar

  • 8:30am: Housing Starts, est. 1.19m, prior 1.13m; MoM, est. 5.59%, prior -4.7%
  • 8:30am: Building Permits, est. 1.25m, prior 1.22m; MoM, est. 2.04%, prior -4.5%
  • 10am: MBA Mortgage Foreclosures, prior 1.29%; Mortgage Delinquencies, prior 4.24%
  • 11am: Kansas City Fed Manf. Activity, est. 20.5, prior 23

DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap

Maybe the S&P 500 will be the new hard currency of the world as nothing seems to break it at the moment. After a very nervous last week (longer in HY and EM) for markets, the S&P 500 closed +0.82% last night (best day since September 11th) and for all the recent fury and angst is only 0.34% off its’ all-time closing high. The Nasdaq gained 1.30% to a fresh all time high and the Stoxx 600 was also up for the first time in eight days. The positive reaction seems to have started in Asia yesterday, in part as commodity prices stabilised somewhat and news that China’s PBoC injected cash with the largest reverse repo operation since January. Then US markets got an additional boost from Cisco guiding to its first revenue gain in eight quarters and Wal-Mart posting its strongest US sales in more than eight years. There was also a little sentiment boost from the House passing its tax bill.

This morning in Asia, markets are strengthening further. The Nikkei (+0.11%), Hang Seng (+0.78%) and Kospi (+0.28%) are all modestly up while the Shanghai Comp. is down 0.55% as we type. Moody’s upgraded India’s sovereign bond rating for the first time since 2004. It’s one notch higher to Baa2/Stable (also one notch higher than S&P’s BBB-) with the agency citing ongoing progress in economic and institutional reforms. India’s 10y bond yields is down c10bp this morning to 6.96%. Elsewhere, UST 10y has partly reversed yesterday’s moves and is trading c2bp lower.

Now back to US tax reforms, which is a small step closer to resolution. The House has voted (227-205) to pass its version of the tax reform bill despite 13 Republicans dissenting. President Trump tweeted “a big step toward fulfilling our promise to deliver historic tax cuts…by the end of the year”. Notably, the more challenging task may now begin in terms of passing the Senate’s version where fiscal constraints are tighter and the Republicans only have 52 of the 100 seats in the Chamber. Overnight, the Senate Finance Committee voted to approve its revised tax package, so a full chamber vote could come as early as the  week after Thanksgiving. If passed, the two versions of the tax bill will need to be somehow reconciled. Our US economist believes there is a decent chance that some version of tax reform can be achieved, but this is likely to be a Q1 event with potential stumbling blocks along the way.

Turning to the various Brexit headlines, PM May flew out last night to Sweden for an informal summit with European leaders seeking to kick start the stalled Brexit talks. She is expected to meet with the Swedish Premier and Irish counterpart before meeting with EU President Tusk on Friday. Following on, the Brexit Secretary Davis noted that we have to “wait a few more weeks” for clarity on how much UK is willing to pay in the divorce settlement. Elsewhere, Goldman Sachs CEO Blankfein tweeted “many (fellow business leaders) wish for a confirming vote on (Brexit)…so much at stake, why not make sure consensus still there?”

Moving onto central bankers’ commentaries. In the US, the Fed’s Mester sounded reasonably balanced and remains supportive of continued gradual policy tightening. She noted “anecdotal feedback from business contacts suggest they are increasing wages”, but it’s going to be hard to see strong wage growth because productivity growth is low. Overall, she sees “good reasons” that inflation will rise back to 2% goal, but “it’s going to take a little longer…”

The Fed’s Williams noted one more rate hike this year and three more in 2018 remains a “reasonable guess” subject to incoming data. Finally, the Fed’s Kaplan  reiterated the Fed would continue to make progress towards achieving its 2% inflation target, but noted that the neutral fed funds rate is “not that far away”.

In the UK, BOE Governor Carney reiterated that interest rates would probably rise “a couple of times over the next few years” if the economy evolved in line with the Bank’s projections, but also cautioned that the fundamental economic impacts of Brexit will only be “known over a very long period of time”. That said, he noted the BOE will remain nimble and support the economy no matter what the result of the Brexit negotiations will be. Elsewhere, Chancellor Hammond has confirmed that the Treasury does not plan to change the inflation gauge that the BOE targets from CPI to CPIH – which includes owner occupied housing costs and is the new preferred price measure by the Office for National Statistics.

Now recapping other markets performance yesterday. Within the S&P, only the energy and utilities sector were modestly in the red (-0.58%), partly weighed down by Norway’s sovereign wealth fund plans to sell c$40bln of energy related stocks to make it less vulnerable to the sector. Elsewhere, gains were led by telco, consumer staples and tech stocks. European markets were all higher, with the DAX and CAC up c0.6% while the FTSE 100 was the relative underperformer at +0.19%. The VIX index dropped 10.4% to 11.76.

Over in government bonds, UST 10y yields rose 5.3bp following the House’s approval of the tax plans and a solid beat for industrial production, while Gilts also rose 2.3bp, in part due to slightly stronger retail sales figures. Other core bond yields were little changed (10y Bunds flat, OATs -0.4bp), while Italian yields marginally underperformed (+0.5bp), partly reflecting that Banca Carige has failed to get banks to underwrite its planned share sale - making a bail in more likely, as well as recent polls (eg: Ipsos) showing the 5SM party taking a modest lead versus peers. Elsewhere, some of the recent pressure in the HY space appears to be reversing with the Crossover index 9.2bp tighter.

Key currencies were little changed, with the US dollar index up 0.13% while Sterling gained 0.18% and Euro fell 0.18%. In commodities, WTI oil dipped 0.34% yesterday but is trading marginally higher this morning after Saudi Arabia reaffirmed its willingness to extend oil cuts at the November 30 OPEC meeting. Elsewhere, precious metals were slightly higher (Gold +0.03%; Silver +0.54%) while other base metals continue to softened, although losses are moderating (Copper -0.17%; Zinc -0.84%; Aluminium -0.35%).

Away from the markets, our US economists have published their latest outlook for the US economy. They note the US economy is on good footing for continued above-trend growth in 2018 and beyond. Overall, they believe private sector fundamentals are broadly sound, the labour market has more than achieved full employment and financial conditions are highly supportive of growth. On real GDP growth, their forecast for 2018 is unchanged at 2.3%, but 2019 is up a tenth to 2.1% while growth in 2020 is expected to slow to 1.5% as monetary policy tightening gains traction. The Unemployment rate is expected to fall to 3.5% by early 2019, so although inflation should remain low through year-end, our team’s medium-term view that core inflation should normalise is intact. Hence, in terms of rates outlook, they still expect the next rate increase in December, followed by three hikes in 2018 and four more in 2019. Elsewhere, tax reform is a wild card, though it faces significant political challenges. Conversely, potential disruptions to trade policy would be a negative development. For more detail, refer to their note.

Before we take a look at today’s calendar, we wrap up with other data releases from yesterday. In the US, the October IP was above expectations at 0.9% mom (vs. 0.5%) and 2.9% yoy – the highest since January 2015, in part as the post storm recovery efforts gets underway. Aggregate capacity utilization was also beat at 77% (vs. 76.3% expected) – highest since April 2015 and the NAHB housing market index was also above at 70 (vs. 67) – highest since March. Elsewhere, the November Philly Fed index was slightly below expectations but still solid at 22.7 (vs. 24.6 expected), with both the new orders and employment indices above 20. Finally, the weekly initial jobless claims was slightly higher (249k vs. 235k expected), perhaps impacted by the delayed filings following the storms and the Veteran’s day holiday, while continuing claims fell to a new 44 year low (1,860k vs. 1,900k expected).

In the UK, core retail sales (ex-auto fuel) for October slightly beat expectations, at 0.1% mom (vs. flat expected) and -0.3% yoy (vs. -0.4% expected). In the Eurozone, the final reading for October CPI was unrevised at 0.1% mom and 1.4% yoy, but France’s 3Q unemployment was slightly higher than expected at 9.7% (vs. 9.5%).

Looking at the day ahead, a slightly quieter end to the week although the ECB’s Draghi is due to give a keynote address on “Europe into a new era – how to seize the opportunities”. The Bundesbank’s Weidmann is also slated to speak while the Fed’s Williams speaks in the evening. US housing starts for October and the Kansas City Fed’s manufacturing activity index for November are the data highlights.

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junction's picture

Indict Mueller for being a key player in the 9/11 mass murder conspiracy.

VinceFostersGhost's picture

 

 

.....and the uranium deal.

 

There needs to be a special counsel for this asshole.

kralizec's picture

No, there needs to be a suicide with a nail gun found in the wrong hand...

Seriously, how fricken hard is it to pull off?

Kayman's picture

Mueller is still the hatchet man for the Washington Mob.  Just his being the head of the FBI during the dirty Clinton/Uranium One deal (Oh my, some people from Uranium One coincidentally put $145 million into the Clinton's bank account that had nothing to do with the Russian sale, my oh my)- is enough that any man with an ounce of honor would have recused himself.

Mueller is using his power to hide his, McCabe's and Rosenstein's cozy relationship with the Clinton dirty money gang.

Cassandra.Hermes's picture

I hope this misunderstanding of president is gone together with his tax increase masked as tax cutting!

jamesmmu's picture
President Trump Drinks Water from Bottle, Leftist Media Goes Berserk

http://investmentwatchblog.com/president-trump-drinks-water-from-bottle-...

VinceFostersGhost's picture

 

 

 

We're now at TTDS...

 

Total Trump Derangement Syndrome!

WTFUD's picture

Yeah it's not like he pulled out his dick and pissed in it.

Cassandra.Hermes's picture

Some fellow Republican drunk once water and president Trump went berserk for weeks! But do you remember birth certificate! Lol guys went for years!

Kayman's picture

Cass Herpes.

HuffPo is calling. You are a shit troll. Go away with your Dirty Noxious Criminals script.

gmak's picture

US futes down 1 point?  Hardly lower. Looks like a round-off error to me.  Meanwhile the taxpayer-funded ponzi scheme that is Tesla jumps $10 - $15 on the unicorn of a battery that lasts for 650 miles.  Why do people believe these fairy tales without any proof?

Bill of Rights's picture

Fuck Mueller, if he had any dirt the MSM would be going bat shit crazy...and were not see that so fuck him and his personal theater.

fleur de lis's picture

That's really all this is -- personal theater.

It is fascinating to watch how far someone will go when assured that he can do anything and money is no object.

He knows very well that this is all a Kabuki show and that the whole Russia boogey man story is a Washingtonian fairy tale.

He knows that few if any Swamp dwellers -- including himself -- could name three Russian cities other than Moscow, or find the Urals prior to this Swamp Kabuki production.

He knows very well that the Swamp is where diplomats from all parts of the world live, and that he could not go for pizza without meeting one.

He knows all of this.

Yet he pretends to be aghast when someone actually speaks with a Russian diplomat who is assigned to the Swamp.

And so he creates Hollyweird-esque drama which of course is all fake but made to look real with theatrics, especially since money is no object and the taxpayer get stuck with the bills as usual.

Fancy job titles, stern documents, and important buildings for props add to the perception that there is a serious investigation going on.

Like Hollyweird, his production does not have to be a success, only entertainment for a few related interests, like the MSM and the DNC.

If this movie/investigation flops, it does not matter because the stars still have their tax funded jobs and can goof off on the pretext of work, in between book deals, talk shows, graduation ceremonies, staff advisory positions and maybe even cameo appearances in actual Hollyweird movies, etc.

Nice work if you can find it.

 

SoDamnMad's picture

You talking about the $36,000. a day Mueller team. They can fuk around for a year or two earning that while producing nothing ABOUT THE RUSSIANS HACKING THE ELECTION  which is what he was empowered to do.

Kayman's picture

$36,000 a day? Shreds a lot of files, sweeps a lot of trails. Mueller ain't going away until he is finished cleaning the trails that lead back to him, Rosenstein and McCabe. Rosenstein didn't appoint Mueller for his class. He was hired for his utility and paid-up membership of the Washington Mob.

Philo Beddoe's picture

Silver is up a penny. 

kralizec's picture

But, the polar vortex is coming!

http://buffalonews.com/2017/11/16/polar-vortex-to-bring-extended-period-...

Get that boating accident in before the lake freezes!

ludwigvmises's picture

Mueller's party will go on for 2-3 years AT LEAST. That's the sad truth. This isn't over by a longshot.

kralizec's picture

Did somebody say "shot"?!  :)

Everybodys All American's picture

Nothing worse than dirty Mueller.

kralizec's picture

Herr Mueller is merely one tool of the DeepState...but a tool that should be broken.

Cassandra.Hermes's picture

The problem is not the Russians — it’s us. A huge percentage of the population can’t tell fact from fiction or the worse, they are able but they are hypocrite until they start believing in their own fiction.

Arrest Hillary's picture

Trump is to Carter .... as Johnny Carson is to Colbert .... class distinctions ?

Arrest Hillary's picture

The Northern Alliance could have built a nuclear observatory at the north pole .... for 1.000th the cost of all the forlorn space programs .... I love resourceful people ?

CAPT DRAKE's picture

Who killed Seth Richards?

kralizec's picture

I'll take "The Bloody Bitch of Benghazi" for $500, Alex.

Rex Andrus's picture

I don't know but accessory Mueller does.

roadhazard's picture

But W H Y... nobody done nuttin'.

Rex Andrus's picture

Don't get your balls in an uproar. Mueller is a stroke job. Just more of his seditious and criminal lawyer FSA fraud.