And For Today's Market Ramp Rumor Du Jour We Have...

Tyler Durden's picture

It has been a while since the Guardian came up with a European "bailout" rumor. Time to change that.

Angela Merkel is poised to allow the eurozone's €750bn bailout fund to buy up the bonds of crisis-hit governments in a desperate effort to drive down borrowing costs for Spain and Italy and prevent the single currency from imploding.

 

Germany has long opposed allowing the eurozone's rescue fund, the European Financial Stability Facility, to lend directly to troubled eurozone countries, fearing that Berlin would end up paying the bill, and the beneficiaries would escape the strict conditions imposed on Greece, Portugal and Ireland.

 

But Merkel has come under intense pressure as financial markets have pushed up borrowing costs for Spain to levels that many analysts see as unsustainable.

 

Analysts are likely to see the decision as the first step towards sharing the burden of troubled countries' debts across the single currency's 17-members; though it falls short of the "eurobonds" proposed by European commission president Jose Manuel Barroso.

 

The proposal was discussed on the margins of the two day G20 summit in Los Cobos, Mexico that has been dominated by the depressing impact of the eurozone crisis on the world economy.

 

It would be the first time that the EU bailout funds have been used directly to purchase Spanish debt. It is understood the money would come from both the €500m European Stability Mechanism and its predecessor, the €250m European Financial Stability Facility.

In a nutshell: Germany will somehow allow a fund, the ESM, which does not yet even exist, overturn the primary principle of the Eurozone, the no sovereign bailout clause, and use money which has not been funded, to subordinate bondholders across the entire continent (because ESM is priming) and serve as an additional secured lender in addition to the ECB...

In other words, the ESM will take place of the ECB's SMP. With the only difference that the ECB can print money, while the unfunded ESM will at best rely on the murky details of repo lending. Same subordination either way, of course.

Also, the whole no-bailout-clause thing embedded in the Lisbon Treaty... they were just kidding about that. 85 million Germans will understand:

Article 125

 

1. The Union shall not be liable for or assume the commitments of central governments, regional, local or other public authorities, other bodies governed by public law, or public undertakings of any Member State, without prejudice to mutual financial guarantees for the joint execution of a specific project. A Member State shall not be liable for or assume the commitments of central governments, regional, local or other public authorities, other bodies governed by public law, or public undertakings of another Member State, without prejudice to mutual financial guarantees for the joint execution of a specific project.

Finally ignore that the joint ESM-EFSF barely has enough money for Spain, let alone Italy. Courtesy of Ray Dalio and Bridgewater:

Sigh.

At this rate of idiocy hitting the tape, Ben better deliver tomorrow...