Another Popular Name Emerges In The Solyndra Scandal

Tyler Durden's picture

This scandal is rapidly becoming the gift that keeps on giving...

Solyndra Offered $535 Million Loan Guarantee by the U.S. Department of Energy

 

Fremont, CA, March 20, 2009 – Solyndra, Inc. announced today that it is the first company to receive an offer for a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) loan guarantee under Title XVII of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.  Solyndra, a Fremont, California-based manufacturer of innovative cylindrical photovoltaic systems, will use the proceeds of a $535 million loan from the U.S. Treasury’s Federal Financing Bank to expand its solar panel manufacturing capacity in California.

 

“The leadership and actions of President Barack Obama, Energy Secretary Steven Chu and the U.S. Congress were instrumental in concluding this offer for a loan guarantee,” said Solyndra CEO and founder, Dr. Chris Gronet.   “The DOE Loan Guarantee Program funding will enable Solyndra to achieve the economies of scale needed to deliver solar electricity at prices that are competitive with utility rates.  This expansion is really about creating new jobs while meaningfully impacting global warming.”

Designed specifically for commercial, industrial and institutional rooftops, Solyndra’s proprietary photovoltaic (PV) systems generate significantly more solar electricity per rooftop at a lower installed cost than conventional flat panel PV technologies. Further, Solyndra’s PV systems are fast and economical to install due to the simple horizontal mounting and unique air-flow properties of the solar panels. Solyndra’s panels are fully certified for U.S. and international use and have been commercially shipping since July 2008.

 

The guaranteed loan, expected to provide debt financing for approximately 73% of the project costs, will allow Solyndra to initiate construction of a second solar panel fabrication facility (Fab 2) in California. On completion, Fab 2 is expected to have an annual manufacturing capacity of 500 megawatts per year.  Solyndra and DOE will finalize the transaction upon completion of definitive documentation and satisfaction of certain conditions precedent.  Over the life of the project, Solyndra estimates that Fab 2 will produce solar panels sufficient to generate up to 15 gigawatts of clean, renewable electricity–enough to avoid 300 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions.  Further, Solyndra estimates that the construction of this complex will employ approximately 3,000 people, the operation of the facility will create over 1,000 jobs, and hundreds of additional jobs will be created for the installation of Solyndra PV systems, in the U.S.

 

“DOE, in consultation with independent consultants, performed a thorough investigation and analysis of our project’s financial, technical and legal strengths,” said Dr. Kelly Truman, Solyndra’s Vice President of Marketing, Sales and Business Development.  “We are proud to be the first company to pass this comprehensive review, and we would like to acknowledge the exceptional efforts of the staff of the DOE Loan Guarantee Program Office.” 

 

Goldman, Sachs & Co. acted as exclusive financial advisor to Solyndra in connection with this loan guarantee application.

Anywhere you look... Goldman has already been there.

 


 

And in tangential news, attached is the just filed engagement letter with which a bankrupt Solyndra will retain Imperial Capital at the cost of $150,000 per month (this is cash that is immediately leaving the estate, thus minimizing recoveries to US taxpayers), a $1 million confirmation fee, a $1 million sale fee (the two are not exclusive), a 1%/3%/5% financing fee (i.e., Imperial arranges follow through financing, although good luck with that), and so on. In other news, should this bankruptcy stretch for more than the usual 1 year period from filing to emergence, US taxpayers will be on the hook for another roughly $3 million, in order to hire a banker whose ultimate value added will be an "orderly" liquidation of the company. What is amusing is that $150k/month was the going rate when bankruptcy firms still had business, and it was a competitive field, unlike now, when even a $10 million debt side assignment gets pitchbooks from Greenhill, Lazard, Rothshild and Blackstone. Perhaps the judge on the case will be so kind to show some fiduciary responsibility when it comes to disbursing taxpayer capital to retain a useless advisor.... even more so that Imperial somehow believes that it should not even be subject to an expense "(including, without limitation, reasonable attorneys’ fees, travel, lodging and meal expenses, messenger services, duplicating services and other customary expenditures)" cap: gotta love using those G-VI jets on the taxpayer's dime.

 

h/t Jeff