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Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: August 13





European equities are trading flat to minor positive territory at the North American crossover having pared losses made following the weaker than expected Japanese Q2 preliminary GDP and reports from Chinese press that China's RRR cut might have been postponed as the People's Bank of China's reverse repo activity still satisfies liquidity needs. Elsewhere, Bank of America cut China's growth forecast from 7.7% to 8.0% for the year, commenting that the country's ability for monetary easing was constrained by house prices. Volumes have been particularly thin, however, and as there is no economic data scheduled for release from the US, it is likely to stay that way. Greek Q2 advanced GDP surprised markets, contracting at a slower pace year-over-year than Q1 and than was expected, boosting risk appetite across the board. As such, Spanish and Italian spreads are seen tighter by 12.6bps and 9.1bps respectively, with the Spanish 10-year yield holding below the key 7% and the Italian's under 6% despite the Italian government debt coming in at a record high of EUR 1972.9bln.

 
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Overnight Sentiment: European Vacation





After declining to an overnight session low of 1.2260 following very disappointing Japanese GDP news, which saw another Q/Q drop in nominal terms and missed every economist expectation, the market leading indicator - the highly leveraged EURUSD pair which is a proxy for risk when it is rising, and ignored when dropping (because the ECB will lower rates, or so thinking goes) was boosted higher starting at 5 am eastern time. What happened then? Greek Q2 GDP was announced, and instead of declining from -6.5% to -7.0% annualized, the number declined at "only" a 6.2% annualized run rate. Apparently that was the only catalyst needed to launch today's risk on phase, sending the EURUSD 70 pips higher, and futures back to green. So to summarize: the world's 3rd largest economy grew far less than expected despite 30 years of central planning, while Europe's worst economy imploded by just that much less than the worst case expected, and this is "good enough." What's worse is that this may well be the high point of the day as there is nothing else left on the docket.

 
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Frontrunning: August 13





  • Oil hits 3-month high above $114 on supply concern (Reuters)
  • G20 plans response to rising food prices (FT)
  • First centrally planned FX, now real estate - SNB Seen Targeting Bank Capital to Curb Property Boom (Bloomberg)
  • EU hedge funds face pay threat (FT)
  • Euro-Area Crisis Has ‘No Obvious End in Sight,’ BOE’s King Says (Bloomberg)
  • King urged to widen recovery measures (FT)
  • All threats "dwarfed" by Iran nuclear work: Israel PM (Reuters)
  • Obama campaign attacks Romney’s pick (FT)
  • Romney, Ryan hit the road in an energized campaign (Reuters)
  • Yellen Must Show How 12 Fed Opinions Become One Policy (Bloomberg)
 
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Key Events In The Coming Week And European Event Calendar August - October





Last week was a scratch in terms of events, if not in terms of multiple expansion, as 2012 forward EPS continued contraction even as the market continued rising and is on the verge of taking out 2012 highs - surely an immediate catalyst for the New QE it is pricing in. This week promises to be just as boring with few events on the global docket as Europe continues to bask in mid-August vacation, and prepare for the September event crunch. Via DB, In Europe, apart from GDP tomorrow we will also get inflation data from the UK, Spain and France as well as the German ZEW survey. Greece will also auction EU3.125bn in 12-week T-bills to help repay a EU3.2bn bond due 20 August held by the ECB. Elsewhere will get Spanish trade balance and euroland inflation data on Thursday, German PPI and the Euroland trade balance on Friday. In the US we will get PPI, retail sales and business inventories tomorrow. On Wednesday we get US CPI, industrial production, NY Fed manufacturing, and the NAHB  housing index. Building permits/Housing starts and Philly Fed survey are the highlights for Thursday before the preliminary UofM consumer sentiment survey on Friday.

 
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RANsquawk EU Market Re-Cap - 13th August 2012





 
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On Gold's Recent Resilience





Some might be surprised by the title's positivity, but while the barbarous relic has meandered in an ever-compressing (triangle pattern) series of waves in the last few months, it has rather notably outperformed relative to global risk aversion, CFTC positioning, and central bank balance sheet dynamics - especially in the last few weeks. Whether the yellow metal's zero-yield is now 'technically' attractive to safe-haven flows relative to the NIRPs of Germany and Switzerland - or in fundamental anticipation of the next bout of central bank largesse, Citi's global macro strategy group remain bullish of the precious metal and the charts below suggest they are not alone - as the view that precious metals are a put on political stupidity remains front-and-center.

 
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Merkel Is Baaaaaaack





Hold on tight boys and girls, cause Merkel is back from vacation, and she is not happy despite that healthy Santorini due diligence-inspired tan (as deputy-Chancellor Fuchs telegraphed earlier today, when he made it quite clear what his boss thinks about Greece, and about more printing). Per Bloomberg: "German Chancellor Angela Merkel returns to the front line of the European debt crisis this week as the bloc’s leaders squabble over measures including bond purchases to relieve concerns the single currency may fragment. Merkel ends her summer vacation and travels to Canada Aug. 15-16 for talks with Prime Minister Stephen Harper as a spiraling euro crisis threatens to constrain the global economy. With the region’s leaders awaiting a German high court decision on bailout funding next month, they’re struggling to smooth divisions over a European Central Bank plan to buy the bonds of indebted nations."

 
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Obama On America's Drought: Blame Congress





Last week Obama insinuated that in the aftermath of the "amazing" post-bankruptcy GM recovery, his next plan is to bailout, well, everyone: "I believe in American workers, I believe in this American industry, and now the American auto industry has come roaring back... Now I want to do the same thing with manufacturing jobs, not just in the auto industry, but in every industry." Also, as it appears, the Bailout'er-In-Chief has taken the saying "make it rain" a little too close to heart, and is now taking the worst drought in decades as a personal central planning challenge. Just because he can. There is one thing preventing him for bailing out US farmers: that thing apparently is evil congress. From his weekly address: "This is an all hands on deck response...  But my administration can't do it alone. Congress needs to do its part too. They need to pass a farm bill that not only helps farmers and ranchers respond to these kinds of disasters, but also makes necessary reforms and gives them certainly year round.... So call your members of congress, write them an email and tell them that now is the time to come together and get this done. Too many Americans are suffering right now to let politics get in the way." All righty then GOP - you heard the president: stop blocking the man who would end the drought if not for your disturbing lack of faith, and vote promptly for "Let's All Make It Rain: It's Only Fair" bill. How else can the systematic bailout of everyone and everything proceed as planned?

 
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It Is A Strange World We Inhabit





Baupost's Seth Klarman sums it all up:

"It is a strange world we inhabit. One where economies remain extremely depressed yet almost no companies go bankrupt, while low interest rates encourage holders of capital to speculate. One where global turmoil mounts while the world passively watches. One where nearly every member of Congress will insist that we need to rein in deficit spending, while collectively Congress accomplishes virtually nothing. It would be absurdly funny if it weren’t so incredibly tragic."

 
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Austerity, Debt-Deleveraging, And Why 'Muddle-Through' Fails





The debt levels of advanced economies remains unsustainably high - bringing with it the considerable risk of renewed crisis - and while strong growth is the best way to deleverage, this solution appears out of reach for most (if not all) economies. Financial repression, austerity, inflation, or default are the remaining options - all of which come with considerable costs to economic growth and employment. While 'muddling-through' appears to be heralded as a positive by many market-savants currently, SocGen notes that the line between a virtuous (expansionary fiscal contraction) and vicious austerity trap comes down largely to policy confidence. Most (if not all) advanced economy politicians entirely lack the public's or market's confidence in credible policy direction (and in fact we are seeing policy uncertainty at extremes) which leads to SocGen's conclusion that the muddle-through strategy (which comes with a high price tag economically and socially) is too high a burden politically and will inevitably lead to spillover to core-Europe and the global financial system.

 
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Guest Post: Mitt Romney's Selection Of Paul Ryan Is A Sign Of Desperation





Many folks were surprised Friday night as rumors began leaking that Romney tapped Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, for the prestigious VP slot. The surprise came largely because many were expecting a more mundane pick like Tim Pawlenty or Rob Portman.  The reactions from the GOP base is positive overall, although the story is still fresh and drawing conclusions is difficult.  The reactions from the Democrat/Liberal base are predictable and we are guessing that the Obama campaign is licking its lips over the prospect of skewering Ryan like a kabob. We have a slightly different take, my feeling is that this pick is an indication that the Romney team is struggling and sees the prospect of winning in November diminishing with each passing day. People like Pawlenty and Portman is the equivalent of swinging for a base hit - the selection of Ryan is swinging for the fences.  It is desperation and an attempt to shake things up substantially in the hopes of energizing a splintered and unimpressed Conservative base. However we prefer to focus on the economics of politics, not the politics of politics - so lets take a look at what exactly makes Ryan such a risk.

 
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As Another Fisker Karma Spontaneously Combusts, "Green" Dreams Go Up In Smoke





Several months ago it seemed that not a day could pass without someone, somewhere making fun of GM's biggest post-bankruptcy flaming failure to date: the Chevy Volt (gross and net of channel stuffing). Of course, since it was all in the name of ecological progress and carbon footprint reduction, most media observers let it go as merely one of the peculiar hurdles on the way to an utopian future in which America would no longer rely on crude imports from evil petroleum cartels. The time has come to redirect ridicule to that other $102,00+ MSRP object of electric aspiration, and henceforth - mockery: the Fisker Karma supercar.

 
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Who Wants The Highest Crude Oil Price? Presenting The OPEC Cost Curve





With the presidential elections fast approaching, the last thing the incumbent wants is for the one thing that can spoil the party - a surge in oil, and thus gas prices - to happen. Which is why despite a sharp return in Iran/Syria war rhetoric, we doubt that the trade off between a "wag the dog"-type transitory war euphoria and $5 gas will be an accretive one for the administration at least in the short-term. Others who certainly would prefer to avoid the record $140 WTI prices seen just before the Lehman collapse are the majors, where margin contraction can only be offset by very finite end-demand destruction. Yet there are those who not only would like to see a surge in oil prices, but in fact need it, to preserve their viability. Chief among them: Iran. Because according to a just released analysis by the Arab Petroleum Investments Corporation, the price at which oil (read Brent) must trade for Iran's budget to balance has soared to $127/barrel, the highest among all OPEC members, $20 higher than 2 years ago, and about $17 higher than the Friday closing price. And far more dangerously, the APIC study has also found that the cartel (which after last year's fiasco in Vienna is anything but) breakeven price has soared from just $77 two years ago to a whopping $99/barrel. Which means that any and every deflationary plunge in oil prices will inevitably be met with a supply collapse or else OPEC members are in danger of pricing themselves right into fiscal insolvency, and economic collapse.

 
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Guest Post: An Austrian View On High Frequency Trading





What is high-frequency trading? We will never exhaustively address this issue here. We recommend that you do your own research on the subject. There are numerous articles on this topic. High-frequency trading (HFT) consists in using sophisticated technology to trade securities. It is highly quantitative, employing algorithms to analyze incoming market data. HF investment positions are held only very briefly, with HF traders trading in and out of positions intraday tens of thousands of times. The important feature is that at the end of a trading day there is no net investment position. Processing speed and access to the exchanges are critical.

 
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