Athens - The Morning After: 48 Buildings On Fire, 150 Looted, Hundreds Arrested

Tyler Durden's picture




 

There is a silver lining to Athens' ever uglier transition to a third world country: the massive GDP boost that awaits it as it sets off to fix broken windows and burned down buildings. In fact, we eagerly await Krugman's OpEd praising some of the more recent developments out of Greece in the past 48 hours. Granted, the country will need to get even more bailout funding from the Troika for said GDP boost to occur, but who cares about details anymore.

From Athens News:

Police said 150 shops were looted in the capital and 48 buildings set ablaze. Some 100 people – including 68 police – were wounded and 130 detained, a police official said on Monday.
There was also violence in cities across the country, including Thessaloniki and the islands of Corfu and Crete.
 
Athenians were shocked at the burnt buildings that included the neoclassical home to the Attikon cinema dating from 1870.
"We are all very angry with these measures but this is not the way out," said Dimitris Hatzichristos, 30, a public sector worker surveying the debris.
Altogether 199 of the 300 lawmakers backed the controversial bill. The 43 who rebelled were immediately expelled by their parties, Pasok and New Democracy.
"Night of terror inside and outside the parliament," conservative daily Eleftheros Typos wrote on its front page.
Asian shares and the euro gained modestly on Monday and MSCI's broadest index of Asia Pacific shares outside Japan edged up as much as 0.3 percent.

Some of the more vivid images from this morning's cleanup crew:

Athenians swept rocks and broken glass from the streets of their city on Monday after a night of violence that gave MPs a taste of the challenge they face in implementing a deeply unpopular austerity bill demanded by the troika.

 

Firefighters doused the smouldering remains of several buildings, set ablaze by hooded youths during protests against the package of pay, pension and job cuts adopted by parliament just after midnight, on Monday morning, after 10 hours of debate.

And while we already knew that democracy is only that on paper, and until someone disagrees, following the expuslion of 43 deputies from their respective parties for disagreeing with the ongoing sacking of Greece by Europes' banks, here are potential next steps.

"Enough is enough!" said 89-year-old Manolis Glezos, one of country’s most famous leftists. "They have no idea what an uprising by the Greek people means. And the Greek people, regardless of ideology, have risen."  Glezos is a national hero for sneaking up the Acropolis at night in 1941 and tearing down a Nazi flag from under the noses of the German occupiers, raising the morale of Athens residents.

Odd: the Greeks managed to stand up to the Nazis, yet when it comes to standing up to Europe's banker cartel, the best the "risen" Greek people can come up with is looting and burning down their own country? Oh well, in the scramble for the last money good asset yet to be pillaged, all is fair in love and rehypothecation.

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Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:01 | 2153011 Schmuck Raker
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Better than expected.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:03 | 2153016 Max Hunter
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And the Euro, she's a climbing...

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:06 | 2153024 LongSoupLine
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Guess I picked the wrong week to stop sniffing glue...

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:07 | 2153029 francis_sawyer
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Well ~ they spent that 19% that they'll be getting rather quickly...

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:10 | 2153039 GetZeeGold
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Worse....they've spent the other 19% they were hoping to get after that.

 

 

 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:18 | 2153049 Harlequin001
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Even the dog looks pissed off...

With regard to this, 'Odd: the Greek's managed to stand up to the Nazis and yet when it comes to standing up to Europe's bankers, the best the "risen" Greek people can come up with is looting and burning down their own country. Oh well, in the scramble for the last money good asset yet to be pillaged, all is fair it appears.', can someone explain at what point the Greek people are allowed to define the term 'Enemies both foreign and domestic?"

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:39 | 2153135 HoofHearted
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Lots of broken window fallacies for everyone....bitchez.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:48 | 2153156 trav7777
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the greeks torch the only things they have.  The party is over so burn the house down?

The leftists will fill this vacuum by promising a bunch of shit for free again.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 10:19 | 2153241 Colonial Intent
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Most "Leftists" I know think people buy too much shit to start with, like SUV's instead of TaTa's, Ricerony instead of fresh food, Viagra instead of Penicillin, Coca Cola instead of clean water,  Etc Etc.

"leftist" Surely you're not old enought to remember Mccarthyism...............

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 11:17 | 2153454 Dumpster Fire
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WTF you have against Rice-a-Roni? 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 11:54 | 2153605 Colonial Intent
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LOL!

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 10:49 | 2153357 Oleander
Oleander's picture

Greeks woke to find the country in ruins!

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 13:54 | 2154146 donsluck
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+1 or ruins in the country!

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 10:26 | 2153184 Shizzmoney
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Odd: the Greek's managed to stand up to the Nazis and yet when it comes to standing up to Europe's bankers, the best the "risen" Greek people can come up with is looting and burning down their own country.

Plus infinity here.  This really exemplifies why fascism, and subverted fascism at that, is the most dangerous foe to freedom in the history of civilization.

I had a good agrument on this with a buddy of mine who teaches at George Mason U.  I said that the reason why most voters' complain about today's US political landscape is because we live in "quasi-fascism".  He disagreed, saying while things are bad and corrupt, we "are not Spain in the 1930's under Franco."

As much as Franco was a right wing statist who tried to eliminate any opposition in site, he wasn't a fascist (in my view).  Fascism is very much misindentified in today's society.  People view it as the Nazis or Italy in 1940s; where in fact, all of the states mentioned above where NATIONALIST: where the STATE is the main corporation, the main religion, the main mission statement for its citizens.  The whole "Third Reich" conqueror mentality.  Think Alexander the Great; not Jaime Dimon.  Saluting a flag that represents a NATION; not a dollar that represents INFLATION.

Fascism, on the other hand, is more represented in this picture:

http://www.adbusters.org/files/cultureshop/products/corpflag2010.jpg

THAT'S fascism; when states and constitutional entities are replaced by groups of big corporations and special interests that write the laws, circumvent citizen caucuses, and shape the way we earn, eat, and live our lives. 

Think of it; Walmart/Exxon/Apple/Coca-Cola have bigger GDPs than most COUNTRIES.  Corporations quite often get their way in legislation (ex: McDonald's/CIGNA and the Healthcare bill) and when they don't, they throw a hissy fit and blackmail government entities with threats of monetary and employment withdrawal (ex: Chris Dodd and the MPAA; Catepillar shutting down a plant in Canada over wages).  When corporate leaders get immunity for crimes that EXTRACT resources from society, just because they have alot of connections and green pieces of paper (ex: Jon Corzine), yet as black kids in the Bronx get caught with a nickle bag of weed, they get shot to death in their bathroom.

Corporations are also subversive in propaganda in shaping the populace to vent their anger at the puppet politicans they represent; that's why the people are throwing their hands up without finding someone to blame, because in reality, the majority of those who cooperate in eroding liberties for profit has become a way of life.  It surrounds us.  The "It is what it is" syndrome. 

It's much easier to wage war against a nation of brown shirts who talk funny, than it is to wage war against a system of corrpution lead by those who the populace believes creates value for society, who have our best interests in heart.  Because in reality, we've all become corrupt, including our critical thinking process.  Being selfish is considered a trait: "Treat yourself".  Hypocracy becomes  bullish, and liberty becomes bearish.

Look at Greece now.  They blame Germany, who is (correctly) the quarterback of this austerity mess, but who else is to blame?  Beside the flaccid Greek populace and government (who are now literally a day late, and a trillion dollars, short), the main architects of this bullshit are bankers of German, Dutch, British, and yes, even American, origin.

The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 10:45 | 2153346 NewAmericaNow
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I disagree with the corporate facism model because walmart has no armed enforcers, neither does McDonalds. The State has the monopoly of force and violence and if it (gov) wanted to take in Loyd Blankfein or anyone else for that matter, even if they had to make up a case, it would be done. Government is like the mob, it gets protection money but has all the hitmen. They can make anyone disappear. We the people have given government too much power because some think by doing so it will solve the worlds problems for them, however, people forget the lessons of history. A governmnet powerful enough to give you all you need is also powerful enough to take everything you have. Silly progressives.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 11:00 | 2153393 Omen IV
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The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist.

you are proving his point  - you have been tricked !

 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 20:25 | 2155883 StormShadow
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+1 for excellent Usual Suspects reference

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 11:21 | 2153458 Shizzmoney
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I disagree with the corporate facism model because walmart has no armed enforcers, neither does McDonalds.

Yeah they do, it is called, "the government".  Who do you think writes those checks the government signs; provides jobs for the populace that keeps a buffer between the politicans and the pitchforks?

Look at how the police beat the shit out of OWS protestors for JPMorgan, who gave them 4 million in a donation.  Look at how the United States Military, for the last 20 years have waged war, covertly or overtly, on countries that threaten the corportocracy's OWN interest (Oil). And these companies do employ in-house loss prevention as well in, terms of surveillance and security, and in some  cases, these people ARE armed.

Lastly, look at the 4 presidents who wanted to change monetary policy: Lincoln (Greenbacks), Garfield (Bonds), McKinley (Treasuries), JFK (Gold/Silver standard).  Guess what happened to them when they were in office?

Think of it in terms of land ownership, which is the real premium in corporate elitism.  Once they grab that, then its your wealth.  Then its your body.  Then its your soul.

Washington IS Wall Street.  Wall Street IS Washington.  Einhorn is Finkle; Finkle is Enhorn.

We aren't talking about small business here; we are talking about big entities who circumvent law and convince the people to open wide and hope they are lucky enough to get the sweet drip of fiat.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 12:16 | 2153715 LvM
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Why do you think there is such a thing as "social security"? Might it have something to do with the fact that average people - not the corporations - want it? The state is a system in which everyone tries to live at the expense of everyone else. That means everyone; JP morgan, McDonalds, Obama, but also Joe Sixpack.

But with the state it is either to take advantage, or be taken advantage of. It's foolish to expect corporations not to try to influence government policy; that would not be neutral, but detrimental to their interests.

Where there is a state, there are entities that will try to use it for their benefit. Long before corporations and banks even existed there was state tyranny. Get the hint.

A last remark about JFK: With E.O. 11110 he was attempting to decrease the circulation of silver certificates, with Federal Reserve notes taking their place, actually shifting power from the treasury to the FED.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 12:23 | 2153751 cramers_tears
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It's not corporate fascism.  It's just plain old fascism.  Walmart and McDonald's do indeed have armed forces and Monsanto now has a fucking army.

http://www.darkgovernment.com/news/monsanto-now-owns-blackwater-xe/

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 11:59 | 2153625 eurogold
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To shizzmoney: Yeah right let's all blame the Germans for allowing this mess to get this far. After all, the Germans actually believed they were doing something good by lending these bandits, and liers Billions upon Billions. Myebe the next time someone asks for such a hand out, the Germans will tell them to go f#*+ themselves. I hope so!

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 12:23 | 2153753 Shizzmoney
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Well, I blame the German bankers, not the German people.  The German people haven't seen any benefit from this, minus a favorable UE rate.  They, like in the United States, are having their own "wage-to-money supply" problems, lead by the fact that there is no minimum wage in Germany.  And you can forget Greece (a beautiful country) being a tourist destination for any German anytime, soon.

I *wish* the Germans would have told Greece to fuck themselves; and vice versa.  It would be GOOD for both sides! 

Greece defaults, sets up its own currency, and can rebuild its economy through soveigernty and decentralization.  Germany calls it a loss, focuses on the PIIGS countries to re-balance the Euro. And the Euro can rid itself of a problem that drags down its own currrency.

The thing is: the bankers, corporations, and their paid government thugs don't want that.  That would affect the Euro, which affects confidence in the currency, which leads to higher exports and bad ROI on their investments (and the investments of international banking houses, like Goldman Sachs). 

Plus, people in general, like being on a power trip.  Tell others what to do "just cause". 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:12 | 2153044 Big Slick
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Great point Tyler.  Using KrugmanLogic, Greek glaziers will contribute tremendously to the 2012 GDP.  Question: will the banks see this as Greece meeting austerity milestones?

What're the laws for firearm ownership by Greek citizens?

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:08 | 2153031 Rakshas
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the best looking pig perhaps.... as if the hangover wasn't bad enough you wake up and gotta chew your arm off to get away.. 

The USD is gonna be one mean ugly bitch when the world wakes up...

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:03 | 2153018 Conrad Murray
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A good start. Now, find the politicians and bankers and slaughter them all. Pike the heads at the gates.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:14 | 2153055 The Limerick King
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The Greeks are now throwing a fit

They're sick of the Kleptocrat shit

Just do the right thing

Like a brave Spartan King

And kick those pricks into the pit!

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 10:15 | 2153234 pods
pods's picture

This one gets my vote for your Magnum Opus!

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:04 | 2153020 Rakshas
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Wall street prequel??

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:59 | 2153192 LawsofPhysics
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A little early for the hopium don't cha think?

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:06 | 2153023 Dick Darlington
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Things change but one constant remains: Head of zEuroponzi Olli Rehn

EU's Rehn Is `Confident' Greece Meeting Demands for Next Bailout (BBG)

Well well, where have we heard that before...

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:06 | 2153025 HD
HD's picture

We can only hope all the bankers are okay.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:19 | 2153080 GetZeeGold
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They're all doing great.....thanks for asking.

 

 

 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:47 | 2153152 GetZeeGold
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Wow.....I didn't think bankers got up this early in the morning. Apparently at least one did.

 

Thanks for the junk amigo!

 

 

 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:44 | 2153146 engineertheeconomy
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My prayers go out to all the Banksters world wide. God bless them and may they keep their  GLOBAL PONZI ENSLAVEMENT SCHEME alive for eternity, so that not even one of them shall ever have to work a day in his life. That would just be wrong...

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 10:08 | 2153219 Shizzmoney
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People always wonder who "They" is. 

I think we know, now.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:08 | 2153026 HD
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Unintentional double post.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:07 | 2153027 fonzannoon
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Michelle somebody hyphen something just explained to me that this looting was done by a small tiny group of anarchists who would rather Greece have voted no. This small group has no bearing on the rest of the country who is very excited for these austerity measures to take place.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:11 | 2153041 HD
HD's picture

CNBC isn't called "bubble vision" for nothing. It's the 1% reporting to the 0.001% that everything is fine and the unwashed masses have been subdued another day.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:59 | 2153191 WillyGroper
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SeaBiscuit?

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 10:02 | 2153203 oldman
oldman's picture

 

dear fonz,

That small tiny group of anarchists is now 180 years old and has always been been the 'jackboot' that brought about torture, hunger, unemployment, destruction, disease, and death.

Oh yeah, my hearties---let's go get those rotten anarchists and string'em up----the banks, the pols, the machine of fuedalism and mercantilism is sacred and holy; besides---they have all the guns and they give us money.

We deserve the shit we eat-----we earn it every minute of our lives

GO SLAVES GO!!!!!!!                        om

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:10 | 2153030 Bobbyrib
Bobbyrib's picture

 

"Athenians were shocked at the burnt buildings that included the neoclassical home to the Attikon cinema dating from 1870. "We are all very angry with these measures but this is not the way out," said Dimitris Hatzichristos, 30, a public sector worker surveying the debris. Altogether 199 of the 300 lawmakers backed the controversial bill. The 43 who rebelled were immediately expelled by their parties, Pasok and New Democracy. "Night of terror inside and outside the parliament," conservative daily Eleftheros Typos wrote on its front page. Asian shares and the euro gained modestly on Monday and MSCI's broadest index of Asia Pacific shares outside Japan edged up as much as 0.3 percent." I wonder what Dimitris will do if they slash his salary by 40-60% (benefits like pension included), or if he gets laid off and he has to get a real job. Something tells me he would not be "OK" with that.

 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:51 | 2153166 trav7777
trav7777's picture

he doesn't have a choice.

I hated austerity measures forced on me when I was broke too.  But I didn't trash my own place and set my car ablaze to protest them.

There seems to be some confusion around here between paying money back and paying interest.  greece and everyone else SHOULD pay the money back they borrowed.  As for compound interest, that is where the morality comes into play.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 10:02 | 2153201 engineertheeconomy
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Trav7777 - they DID pay the loan back years ago, what they are trying to do but can't is pay back the interest. It is never possible to pay interest, unless you pay it with counterfeit. As for wether or not he has choice, of course he has choice. He can get rid of the ponzi euro and go back to a currency backed by something other than paper, sweat and tears

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 10:03 | 2153202 Colonial Intent
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"I hated austerity measures forced on me when I was broke too"

"But I didn't trash my own place and set my car ablaze to protest them."

So you own a property and a car and yet you think yourself broke?

Isn't that a river in Aegypt?

 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:08 | 2153032 Catullus
Catullus's picture

Under Keynesianism, the burnt down building are a good thing because now they can spend more money to repair them thus boosting the Greek economy.  See, they're not rioters, they're solution makers.

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 11:09 | 2153421 Dan Conway
Dan Conway's picture

This is why the markets are up today.  I remember learning this in college and reinforced periodically by Krugman.  All of this GDP boost from repairing all of these buildings, restocking the shelves of Ipads for those cool but overworked 50 year old retiree hairdressers, the overtime to all of those police and fireman to buy more german submarines, etc.  And to think those nice Germans keep sending more money to keep growing the Greek GDP.   The only question that I have for Professor Krugman is why after several months of rioting does the Greek GDP keep declining with all of this stimulus?  It must be George Bush's fault!

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:08 | 2153033 NoClueSneaker
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How many AR-15s in NJ?

Good luck, NYPD :-P

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:57 | 2153181 GetZeeGold
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Legal or quasi-legal?

 

 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:09 | 2153034 latizziforchizzi
latizziforchizzi's picture

The Greek Redux

 

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 09:09 | 2153035 cossack55
cossack55's picture

Perhaps Mr. Glezos would like to repeat his heroics by climbing the Greek CB building and ripping down the Euro flag.

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