Bank Of America Has Lost Money Trading On Only Three Days In 2012

Tyler Durden's picture

From the just released Bank of America 10-Q: "During the three months ended June 30, 2012, positive trading-related revenue was recorded for 95 percent, or 60 of the 63 trading days of which 75 percent (47 days) were daily trading gains of over $25 million and the largest loss was $11 million. These results can be compared to the three months ended March 31, 2012, where positive trading-related revenue was recorded for 100 percent (62 days) of the trading days of which 95 percent (59 days) were daily trading gains of over $25 million. There were no daily trading losses recorded during the three months ended March 31, 2012." This vaguely reminds us of the JPM's trading performance. Just before they got busted for hiding a $350 billion hedge fund in the firm's "risk hedging" aka CIO/Treasury division that is. Also, if anyone else has problems believing that BofA's trading desk, with or without Merrill, both of which are better known as the C-grade (and that is being generous) of Wall Street traders, could generate profits on 122 of 125 trading days, please lift your hand.

Also, for those who are far more interested by the firm's imminent plethora of putback settlements, in the aftermath of the July 17 Syncora agreement, among which with MBIA, here is what the Bank has to say about that:

Recent Syncora Settlement

 

On July 17, 2012, we, including certain of our affiliates, entered into an agreement with Syncora Guarantee Inc. and Syncora Holdings, Ltd. (Syncora) to resolve all of the monoline insurer's outstanding and potential claims related to alleged representations and warranties breaches involving eight first- and six second-lien RMBS trusts where Syncora provided financial guarantee insurance. The agreement, among other things, also resolves historical loan servicing issues and other potential liabilities to Syncora with respect to these trusts. The agreement covers the five second-lien RMBS trusts that were the subject of litigation and nine other first- and second-lien RMBS trusts, which had an original principal balance of first-lien mortgages of approximately $9.6 billion and second-lien mortgages of approximately $7.7 billion. As of June 30, 2012, $3.0 billion of loans in these first-lien trusts and $1.4 billion of loans in these second-lien trusts have defaulted or are 180 days or more past due (severely delinquent). The agreement provided for a cash payment of $375 million to Syncora. In addition, the parties entered into securities transfers and purchase transactions in connection with the settlement in order to terminate certain other relationships among the parties. The total cost to the Corporation was approximately $400 million and was fully accrued for by the Corporation at June 30, 2012.

 

Unresolved Repurchase Claims

 

At June 30, 2012, the total notional amount of our unresolved representations and warranties repurchase claims was approximately $22.7 billion compared to $12.6 billion at December 31, 2011. These repurchase claims do not include any repurchase claims related to the Covered Trusts. Unresolved repurchase claims represent the notional amount of repurchase claims made by counterparties, typically the outstanding principal balance or the unpaid principal balance at the time of default. For a table of unresolved repurchase claims, see Note 8 – Representations and Warranties Obligations and Corporate Guarantees to the Consolidated Financial Statements. In the case of first-lien mortgages, the claim amount is often significantly greater than the expected loss amount due to the benefit of collateral and, in some cases, mortgage insurance or mortgage guarantee payments. Claims received from a counterparty remain as outstanding until the underlying loan is repurchased, the claim is rescinded by the counterparty, or the claim is otherwise resolved. When a claim is denied and we do not receive a response from the counterparty, the claim remains in the unresolved claims balance until resolution. We expect unresolved repurchase claims to continue to increase due to, among other things, our differences with Fannie Mae (FNMA) regarding our interpretation of the governing contracts ongoing litigation with monoline insurers, and a continuing submission of claims by private-label securitization trustees in combination with the lack of an established process to resolve disputes with private-label securitization trustees. For more information see Estimated Range of Possible Loss – Government-sponsored Enterprises on page 60.

 

The notional amount of unresolved GSE repurchase claims totaled $11.0 billion at June 30, 2012. We continued to experience elevated levels of new claims from FNMA, including claims related to loans on which borrowers have made a significant number of payments (e.g., at least 25 payments) and, to a lesser extent, loans which defaulted more than 18 months prior to the repurchase request. Unresolved claims from FNMA totaled $10.1 billion at June 30, 2012, including $7.3 billion of claims related to loans on which the borrower has made at least 25 payments. During the six months ended June 30, 2012, we received $6.3 billion of claims from FNMA, including $5.5 billion of claims related to loans originated between 2005 and 2007. This amount includes $4.4 billion of loans on which the borrower had made at least 25 payments, including $2.1 billion of loans on which the borrower had made at least 37 payments. Historically, for those claims that have been approved for repurchase from the GSEs, our loss severity rate on loans originated between 2004 and 2008 has averaged approximately 55 percent of the claim amount, which may or may not be predictive of future loss severity rates. We continue to believe that our interpretation of the governing contracts is consistent with past practices between the parties and our contractual obligations. For further discussion of our experience with the GSEs, see Government-sponsored Enterprises Experience on page 61.

 

The notional amount of unresolved monoline repurchase claims totaled $3.1 billion at June 30, 2012. We have had limited repurchase claims experience with monoline insurers due to ongoing litigation and have not received a significant amount of new repurchase claims from the monolines in recent periods. We have reviewed and declined to repurchase substantially all of the unresolved claims at June 30, 2012 based on an assessment of whether a breach exists that materially and adversely affected the insurer's interest in the mortgage loan. Further, in our experience, the monolines have been generally unwilling to withdraw repurchase claims, regardless of whether and what evidence was offered to refute a claim. Substantially all of the unresolved monoline claims pertain to second-lien loans and, except those that have been resolved in the Syncora Settlement, are currently the subject of litigation. In addition, $674 million of monoline claims outstanding at June 30, 2012 were resolved through the Syncora Settlement on July 17, 2012. For further discussion of our experience with the monoline insurers, see Monoline Insurers on page 63.

 

The notional amount of unresolved claims from private-label securitization trustees, whole-loan investors and others increased to $8.6 billion at June 30, 2012 compared to $3.3 billion at December 31, 2011. The increase is primarily due to increases in submission of claims by private-label securitization trustees. We anticipated an increase in aggregate non-GSE claims at the time of the BNY Mellon Settlement a year ago, and such increase in aggregate non-GSE claims was taken into consideration in developing the increase in our reserves at that time. We do expect unresolved repurchase claims from private-label securitization trustees to increase as claims continue to be submitted by private-label securitization trustees and there is not an established process for the ultimate resolution of claims on which there is a disagreement. At least 25 payments have been made on approximately 63 percent of the defaulted and severely delinquent loans sold to non-GSE securitizations or as whole loans between 2004 and 2008. For further discussion of our experience with whole loans and private-label securitizations, see Whole Loans and Private-label Securitizations on page 64.

 

During the three months ended June 30, 2012, the Corporation received $8.2 billion in new repurchase claims, including $4.4 billion submitted by the GSEs for both legacy Countrywide originations not covered by the GSE Agreements and legacy Bank of America originations, $3.7 billion submitted by private-label securitization trustees and $119 million submitted by whole-loan investors. During the three months ended June 30, 2012, $1.6 billion in claims were resolved, primarily with the GSEs. Of the claims resolved, $876 million were resolved through rescissions and $704 million were resolved through mortgage repurchases and make-whole payments.