For The First Time Ever, Most Americans Don't Believe Their Congressional Rep Deserves Reelection

Tyler Durden's picture

Following years of destroying this country and acting as a spineless proxy only for Wall Street, Congress is facing a historic event: for the first time a majority of Americans are demanding a clean out of the House. The full poll indicating that yet another bloodbath is coming during the next election season can be found here, but here is CNN's commentary. "Only 41 percent of people questioned say the lawmaker in their district in the U.S. House of Representatives deserves to be re-elected - the first time ever in CNN polling that that figure has dropped below 50 percent. Forty-nine percent say their representative doesn't deserve to be re-elected in 2012. And with ten percent unsure, it's the first time that a majority has indicated that they would boot their representative out of office if they had the chance today." Time for a radical overhaul of the utterly criminal and corrupt American political system, preferably replacing it with one that will return democracy back to the system?

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"That 41 percent, in the polling world, is an amazing figure. Throughout the past two decades, in good times and bad, Americans have always liked their own member of Congress despite abysmal ratings for Congress in general," says CNN Polling Director Keating Holland. "Now anti-incumbent sentiment is so strong that most Americans are no longer willing to give their own representative the benefit of the doubt.  If that holds up, it could be an early warning of an electorate that is angrier than any time in living memory."

 

As for all members of Congress, the poll indicates only a quarter of the public says most members of Congress deserve to be re-elected.

 

A lot of that anger seems directed toward the GOP.  According to the survey, favorable views of the Republican party dropped eight points over the past month, to 33 percent. Fifty-nine percent say they have an unfavorable view of the Republican party, an all-time high dating back to 1992 when the question was first asked.

 

The poll indicates that views of the Democratic party, by contrast, have remained fairly steady, with 47 percent saying they have a favorable view of the Democrats and an equal amount saying they hold an unfavorable view.

 

"The Democratic party, which had a favorable rating just a couple of points higher than the GOP in July, now has a 14-point advantage over the Republican party," adds Holland.

Our advice to career politicians: do not be an incumbent in the next few years. The same goes for presidents.