German President Demands Merkel Explain 'Why Germany Needs To Save The Euro'

Tyler Durden's picture

While we have been surprised by the lack of public consternation within Germany at the real levels of servitude that an ungrateful Europe is trying to shove down the German taxpayer's throats; this week it appears the rubber is starting to meet the road. As Europe Online reports, German President Joachim Gauck called for Chancellor Angela Merkel to explain why Germany needs save the euro - at great expense to the country‘s taxpayers - and what will be necessary. In a TV interview, Gauck (having no doubt read our recent explanations of the TARGET2 ticking time-bomb and the real cost of GRExit) said that Merkel "has the duty to describe in great detail what it means [to stay in the Euro], including what it means for the budget". In a somewhat shockingly honest (for a European leader) comment he said that the political establishment has struggled to explain why it is vital for Germany to do its part to save Europe's currency union. Perhaps reflecting Juncker's Modus operandi, Gauck added that "sometimes it‘s hard to explain what this is all about. And, sometimes, there‘s a lack of effort to openly tell the populace what is actually happening."

 

The Telegraph adds, anti-euro protest within Germany is becoming louder as potential costs escalate (as we noted here) and a group of 170 economists from the 'German-speaking' zone published a warning -letter that a banking-union aggregating EUR23 trillion of bank debt would expose northern creditor states to ruinous liabilities (quite notable given the WSJ's report tonight that the overarching banking supervisorory body is getting close - more rumors).

They said such a move would lead to bitter discord between countries and ultimately poison the European Project. The group called for the losses to be imposed on banks and creditors, claiming the EU's current bail-out policies amount to a rescue for "Wall Street and the City of London".

Pro bail-out economists in Germany said such arguments are reckless and echo the sort of "liquidationist" thinking that allowed the US and Central European banking systems to collapse in 1931, with dire consequences.