Greek Bank Deposits Plunge By €5.5 Billion In September: Biggest Monthly Drop Ever

Tyler Durden's picture

We had a feeling that the modest upward blip in Greek August deposits by corporations and households, to the tune of €1.4 billion, was a "transitory" event. It was. According to just released data by the Bank of Greece, the September collapse in gross deposits from €188.7 billion €183.2 billion was the largest ever, and took the total to an amount last seen in June 2007. Indicatively Greek deposits peaked at €237.8 billion in September 2009. Said otherwise, in addition to being massively undercapitalized, banks cash in the form of deposit liabilities has plunged 23% from its all time highs. Look for this number to continue dropping month after month as more and more Greeks move their cash offshore. Additionally, the ECB announced that financing to Greek banks in September was €77.8 billion while Greek reliance on the "temporary" Emergency Liquidity Assistance program hit €26.6 billion according to Bloomberg. With every additional deposit outflow, expect ever more money to be needed to keep the Greek sham of a banking system afloat, and more and more Germans to follow in Jens Weidmann's footsteps and start getting very, very angry.