Meet The Latest Converted Gold Bug: The IMF

Tyler Durden's picture

When wonkish blogs suggest gold ownership as a hedge for the political idiocy of the world, it is mockingly shrugged off. When the BRICs add gold, it is eschewed in a 'well, its diversification' argument. But when the bankers' bankers' bank - The IMF - starts adding Gold to its reserves to cover higher expected credit risk losses (read major devaluations of fiat currency exposure), perhaps - just perhaps - the 'rationality put' we noted earlier is becoming a little more expensive in the minds of Lagarde and her colleagues. As Bloomberg News reports, “The Fund is facing increased credit risk in light of a surge in program lending in the context of the global crisis,” the IMF staff wrote in a report released today, adding "there is a need to increase the Fund’s reserves in order to help mitigate the elevated credit risks,” and as CommodityOnline added: "The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is planning to purchase more than $2 billion worth of gold on account of rising global risks. The IMF currently holds around 2800 tonnes of gold at various depositories".

The IMF announced in February 2010 that phased sales of gold on the market would be initiated shortly (after proposing the initial 403.3 ton sale in September 2009. At that time, a total of 191.3 tons of gold remained to be sold, following the sale of a total of 212 tons to three central banks during October and November 2009.

 

Chart: Bloomberg