A Time Lapse Video On The Origins Of Globalization

Tyler Durden's picture




 

Before there was seamless connectivity, before there was one global electronic currency and instantaneous global debt creation, before there was the internet, supply-chain "logistics", World Bank, IMF, and economic hitmen, there were... ships. Because in order to allow modern Ricardian economics to flourish (we would be curious to read some/any scholarly papers probing the failure of Ricardo's theories in a ZIRP regime, unfortunately there are none, as never before has the cost of money been zero essentially until regime end), and before money could be printed with impunity, backed solely by full lack of faith and eroding credit, nations had to actually trade with each other, and money was simply a means to facilitate said trade, which in turn allowed the formation of wealth and subsequent asymmetric power relationships. Needless to say, any nation that imported itself to death would be promptly wiped out by its heretofore friendly neighbors who would simply invade it when the money to buy stuff and to fund armies ran out: sadly TARGET2 was not available during Victorian times. So where are we going with this? Ben Schmidt, a Princeton graduate student, using ship logs has conceived of this tremendous time lapse of every single major known ship route taken by Dutch, Spanish and English vessels during the "age of transition", the period between 1750 and 1850, which set the stage for today's "global economy." The result is a fantastic insight into the early stages of globalization.

The first video above shows a time-lapse of 100 years of ship routes. As Schmidt explains:

It shows about 100 years of ship paths in the seas, as recorded in hundreds of ship's log books, by hand, one or several times a day. I haven't watched the whole thing at once, but skipping around gives a pretty good idea of the state of the database (if not world shipping) at any given moment. This shows mostly Spanish, Dutch, and English routes—they are surprisingly constant over the period (although some empires drop in and out of the record), but the individual voyages are fun. And there are some macro patterns—the move of British trade towards India, the effect of the American Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, and so on.

Some notable comments on voyages of interest and limitations of the process:

  • You get some individual voyages of interest. The Battle of Saldanha Bay (1796), when a contingent of Dutch ships sail south and engage with the British in August by the Cape, is clearly visible on the map; so is much of the Resolution's route on Captain Cook's second voyage (1772-1775) through the South Pacific, including its southernmost point. Some other events--the massive Spanish convoys in 1778 leaving from Peru, for example--I can't place as easily. The Beagle, unfortunately, is not represented.
  • The Pacific is, as I said, almost completely ignored in the records. Still, I'm amazed at how consistently the voyages end around Singapore/Batavia rather than proceed up to China and Japan. Dael's the expert on Pacific shipping, maybe he has something to say on this.
  • Relatedly, so are the United States--possibly since this is biased towards naval vessels, and the US was mostly trading, possibly since this is an EU project. But French ships are almost as poorly represented.

 

And for those with time constraints, Schmidt created the following condensed video breaking one century of data into its seasonal constituents.

There aren't many truly seasonal events, but a few stand out. There are regular summer voyages from Scotland to Hudson's Bay, and from Holland up towards Spitsbergen, for example: both these appear as huge convoys moving in sync. (What were those about?) Trips around Cape Horn, on the other hand, are extremely rare in July and August. More interestingly, the winds in the Arabian sea seem to shift directions in November or so. I also really like the way this one brings across the conveyor belt nature of trade with the East.

And the abbreviated video:

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Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:03 | 2350014 SilverTree
SilverTree's picture

Looks like the Matrix Sentinels.

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:16 | 2350046 NewThor
NewThor's picture

Agent Smith the Timothy Geithner model,

is on the electric nets television

talking about a New World Bank order,

and WILL breathing life into ALL.

In a straight fist fight, the Geithner model is the easiest to defeat.l

NEW WORLD BANK LEADER TO ALIGN WORLD BANKS

bitchez.

Whoa.

 

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 21:44 | 2350298 AldousHuxley
AldousHuxley's picture

so in summary, commodities and products to Europe, shiny new impractical toys to kings in Asia/Africa.

 

For China special Opium gift from the British.

 

fast forward to 2012, you got oil coming out of middle east to America and Europe, iPad and BMW going to Arab elites.

cheap Walmart from China going to America, iPad and worthless US dollar to China.

 

It is all big happy family.

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 23:32 | 2350468 Urban Roman
Urban Roman's picture

Some of those ship's log graphs remind me of the Blackadder episode where they sail around in circles just outside the harbor.

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 00:21 | 2350545 AldousHuxley
AldousHuxley's picture

pirates?

 

they still have them in the coasts off of somalia I hear.

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 08:53 | 2351011 Dien Bien Poo
Dien Bien Poo's picture

quite brilliant episode. Tom Baker as the mad Captain who was as clueless as a central banker. arrrrgghhhhhhh.

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:01 | 2350016 killallthefiat
killallthefiat's picture

My kids and I have been reading Treasure Island, Gulliver's Travel's, Kidnapped, Mutiny on the Bounty, etc.  They will like this. 

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:41 | 2350082 i-dog
i-dog's picture

They might also enjoy the real origins of global trade -- by the Chinese ... many hundreds of years before the Europeans got in on the act:

"Beginning in 1405, the Yongle Emperor entrusted his favored eunuch commander Zheng He (1371–1433) as the admiral for a gigantic new fleet of ships designated for international tributary missions.


The Chinese had sent diplomatic missions over land and west since the Han Dynasty (202 BCE – 220 CE) and had been engaged in private overseas trade leading all the way to East Africa for centuries—culminating in the Song and Yuan dynasties—but no government-sponsored tributary mission of this grandeur and size had ever been assembled before.

 

To service seven  different tributary missions abroad, the Nanjing shipyards constructed two thousand vessels from 1403 to 1419, which included the large treasure ships that measured 112m (370 ft) to 134m (440 ft) in length and 45m (150 ft) to 54m (180 ft) in width.[47]"

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ming_Dynasty#Treasure_fleet

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 21:59 | 2350326 killallthefiat
killallthefiat's picture

They loved Engineering an Empire, which detailed this, all of which is available on the penultimate big thing, NFLX

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 22:16 | 2350359 Prometheus418
Prometheus418's picture

Sadly, I believe you are right (penultimate big thing.)  It's sad, because I like Netflix- it's cheap, and has all kinds of wierd shit to choose from.  It'll be a sad day if I ever have to stoop the those Redbox things.

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 23:14 | 2350440 JOYFUL
JOYFUL's picture

Dawg!...have you fallen prey to the dreaded disease of chinese citizenism?!* The voyages of Zheng He are remarkable for exactly the opposite reason of the assumed purpose of trade...

as your quoted source points out...

these were 'international tributary missions', which though conducted by ships of gigantic(for the time) tonnage, were not employed to bring back trade goods from far off places, but rather, to shock n awe rulers of other countries into accepting tributary status...the ships brought back oddities for the amusement of the Emperor, carried soldiers, and displays of Chinese manufacturies like silk and paper, but had little commercial purpose...one of the reasons that the fleet was allowed to rot into oblivion - it was a drain on Imperial resources.

Confucian-influenced Chinese culture has always looked down upon trade  and the merchant classes as a necessary but contemptible element of foreign relations...exactly the situation which drove the English crazy in their first attempts to get the Chinese to agree to open up commercial relations in the C18th - the Empire was only interested in bizarrities like clocks and toys, and had no use for the trade goods that they dismissed as mere trinkets, and the round-eyes as crude barbarians. Silks and other precious goods had to be paid for in precious metals....until the imposition of the opium trade changed the balance of power to the gweilos' favor!

A cursory investigation of land-based commercial relations between the Middle Kingdom and the rest of the world will show the same dynamic - articles of trade were handled by the foreign class of commerciante resident there - Armenians, Hebrews, Arabs, Sogdians and the like, overseen by the civil servants of the diplomatic corps who's trips to the West were exactly of the same nature as those permitted to Zheng He(a Muslim hajji btw!). Nothing has really changed even to the present moment...clearly the willingness of the west to export its' manufacturing base and accept poisoned trinkets in return is evidence of the success of the present day Chinese mission to impose it's dominance world wide!

China remains inscrutable in it's motives to the western mind, and the cost of such lack of understanding is increasingly reflected in the balance of trade deficits being rung up by the tributary Euromerikan satrapies of the Imperial East! 

*Readers, beware the beguiling words of that arch-perpetrator of chinese citizenism here -AAnonymous- or you too may fall prey of the chinese disease virus through your computer screens!!!!!!!(with credit to Fourth Stooging for his diligent work in identifying this pestilential threat!)

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 00:10 | 2350469 i-dog
i-dog's picture

LOL ... Made me laugh!™

It's both productive and counter-productive to compare the post-Enlightenment world with that pertainlng in earlier times. The rise of private commerce, outside the limited privilege of royal charter, is a relatively recent innovation in human history.

The purpose of my reference to the Chinese Imperial Fleet was simply to demonstrate that the reference point of the original article (the East India companies, both Dutch and British) was preceded by global trade over the seas from other quarters (at a time when Europeans thought they'd fall off the edge of the planet if they ventured beyond sight of land)! The Phoenicians and Vikings also come to mind.

You also overlooked the reference in the wiki article to private trade by China, over the seas, dating back to the pre-Christian times of the Han dynasty ... though, admittedly, one can be sure that the imperial throne still took a cut.

"[dismissed] the round-eyes as crude barbarians"

Who could blame them?

 

PS. I have a very deep understanding of Chinese history, language, psychology and character ... both the positives and the negatives :)

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 00:34 | 2350573 JOYFUL
JOYFUL's picture

Dawg...not overlooked....indeed the 'private' nature of such trade is conducive to the thesis presented...but that is a subject for another time n place...

main thing was to bring on the laughter, and happy to hear 'mission accomplished'!  I am well aware of your signal celerity, and appreciate it's presence here daily as a reward for digging thru the drudgery of lesser dividends!

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 03:35 | 2350706 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

The rise of private commerce, outside the limited privilege of royal charter, is a relatively recent innovation in human history.

_____________________________________________

The King was not a private person? Really?

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 04:09 | 2350740 JOYFUL
JOYFUL's picture

I was hoping you'd git the message, and move yur moronic musings to more suitable digs...but as it seems otherwise, I must warn yu that I am placing an order with AACME SURPLUS today, in expectation of receiving my AANTI-CHINESE CITIZENISM KIT no later than Wednesday...and fully intend to use it to negate yur gnarly nonsense at that time!

 

 

yup...Really!

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 09:35 | 2351102 i-dog
i-dog's picture

 

"The King was not a private person? Really?"

Sheesh ... Don't you have any books in China? Or did they just erase all references to your emperors in the ones that escaped the destruction of the Glorious Cultural Revolution ("Let a thousand flowers bloom ... and all cultural history perish")!

If you don't understand the difference between a monarch and his/her subjects, then I can't help you any further.

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 11:00 | 2351430 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

i-dog said:

If you don't understand the difference between a monarch and his/her subjects, then I can't help you any further.

Agreed. Nevertheless, I must give all due credit to AnAnonymous for participating in a forum in which 99.44 percent of the comments are in English, which is not his native language. Perhaps he would have a better understanding of your point if it was phrased using terms with which he is more familiar:

"The King, or Emperor, in historical Chinese dynasties, was an early prototypical example of a US citizenism corporate CEO. After doing the US citizenish thing at Easter Island by depleting all resources in the year 79 AD, the Indo European US citizen Easter Islanders left the depleted island to a few starving natives and saw a better opportunity for overconsumption in the exterior known as China. They imposed US citizenism corporatism on the newly conquered exterior, making it a public US citizenism corporation. The native Chinese were given paper non-voting shares in the US citizenism Chinese Emperor corporation which paid a negative dividend, thus leading to the extraction of tribute."

 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 10:37 | 2351342 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

i-dog said:

LOL ... Made me laugh!™

ROR!

The purpose of my reference to the Chinese Imperial Fleet was simply to demonstrate that the reference point of the original article (the East India companies, both Dutch and British) was preceded by global trade over the seas from other quarters (at a time when Europeans thought they'd fall off the edge of the planet if they ventured beyond sight of land)!

Thank you so much for providing this insight. While we all have a good laugh about time traveling US citizenism wiping out the Easter Islanders in the 1600s, your contribution enhances the original article by placing it within a broader historical context.

One of the things I most appreciate about history is the way it shows how much of human nature, both the good and the bad, is common to us all, regardless of our separation by geography or time.

The Phoenicians and Vikings also come to mind.

Ah, yes, the Vikings, who began spreading US citizenism to Vinland a thousand years ago, blobbing up and exploiting the resources of the native Skraelings.

"[dismissed] the round-eyes as crude barbarians"

Who could blame them?

Indeed. Some things never change.

 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 04:01 | 2350734 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

Dawg!...have you fallen prey to the dreaded disease of chinese citizenism?!* The voyages of Zheng He are remarkable for exactly the opposite reason of the assumed purpose of trade...

____________________________________________

Chinese citizenism in the 1500s?

Today's China has nothing to do with 1500s China.

More fantasy again.

There is nothing like Chinese Citizenism.

It is just a fantasy invented by US citizens on this site to mediate between reality and their thoughts on how reality should be.

The claims US citizens are ready to produce to avoid facing that globalization is older than they like to claim (that is four decades age), that many US citizen nations are the product of globalization and that globalization has been essentially benefitial to US citizen nations...

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 11:05 | 2351453 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

AnAnonymous said:

Chinese citizenism in the 1500s?

Yes. Chinese citizenism is eternal.

Today's China has nothing to do with 1500s China.

They share more characteristics than there are stars in the sky.

Alas, alas, even the stars are not as eternal as Chinese citizenism.

The claims US citizens are ready to produce to avoid facing that globalization is older than they like to claim (that is four decades age), that many US citizen nations are the product of globalization and that globalization has been essentially benefitial to US citizen nations...

...said the Chinese US citizenism citizen.

 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 13:22 | 2352018 JOYFUL
JOYFUL's picture

 

Made me laugh!

...in the ill-advised attempt of yur programmers to produce a refinement of yur conversational ability, yu have indeed blown a gasket Marvin, and are in the process of meltin down!!!!!

Good luck with that forthcomin Gobi Desert posting boyz!!!! Yu may find that 'today's China' has even more to do with BC fifteenth century China than yu ever thought possible! 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 10:23 | 2351292 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

JOYFUL said:

with credit to Fourth Stooging for his diligent work in identifying this pestilential threat!

While I thank you for the accolades, kind sir, I must point out that proper credit must go to akak, as he is the one that first sounded the warning klaxon about the threat our planet faces from blobbing up Chinese citizenism.

 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 13:04 | 2351961 JOYFUL
JOYFUL's picture

Fourth:

while it be tru that credit is due to AKAK for the initial identification, it has been your diligent work in tracking the viral villain that has made all the difference in allowing us to enjoy this moment of watching the imminent demise of what I had more than half way suspected to be some kind of newfangled bot being tried out upon us...

I am now more than sure that this is what we are dealing with...it's serial inability to form coherent thoughts, grasp vernacular english idioms, or respond with any form of repartee,(though it may be argued that is a condition endemic to many of the minions of satan here!?!?) or indeed, respond at all, is a dead giveaway...just another evil Moriarty cipher played by the usual suspects!

Watch and enjoy the smoke and flames to ensue shortly as AA/CHINESECITIZEN #6 does the BLOWED UP REAL GOOD for us live time! ...er, perhaps I should say....BLOBBED UP REAL GOOD!>!>!????

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 22:25 | 2353409 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

JOYFUL said:

Watch and enjoy the smoke and flames to ensue shortly as AA/CHINESECITIZEN #6

"I not a number, I a free man. Now how I get off this irand? This virrage drive me coconuts!"

BLOWED UP REAL GOOD for us live time! ...er, perhaps I should say....BLOBBED UP REAL GOOD!>!>!????

Big Jim McBlob: Boy, he blobbed up good!

Blobby Sol Hurok: He blobbed up real good!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUtdXzBSVaU

 

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 23:56 | 2350490 AldousHuxley
AldousHuxley's picture

How about the original "trade" of human resources (aka. slaves)? probably as old as wars.

 

 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 00:07 | 2350511 i-dog
i-dog's picture

One could say that was the original purpose of wars. It goes back to at least the early days of the Pharaohs, if not further.

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 03:37 | 2350710 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

How so? Wars predated the introduction of slavery.

But hey, US citizenism is as US citizen does so...

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 05:29 | 2350773 falak pema
falak pema's picture

by your definition Genghis Khan was the first chinese member of the US citizenism clan. Pretty prolific guy; 2000 mistresses and 6000 progeny in his own lands. Now I know he fathered the US nation all on his own...as per your eloquence about US citizenism, they are all Genghis clones. 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 11:16 | 2351503 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

falak pema said:

by your definition Genghis Khan was the first chinese member of the US citizenism clan. Pretty prolific guy; 2000 mistresses and 6000 progeny in his own lands.

Now that is some serious blobbing up.

Sounds like the Chinese citizenism founding father.

 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 03:55 | 2350730 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

Because the Chinese reached the eastern coast of Africa, it has to be a kick start to globalization?

Global means global indeed.

As one post beneath pointed, the starting point of globalization is circumnavigation achieved by Magellan-Elcano.

Everything to kick the can, everything to avoid facing reality.

Fantasy, here we come.

It is easier to understand why fantasy works sold as fantasy works by US citizens are so poor in quality.

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 11:24 | 2351556 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

AnAnonymous said:

Because the Chinese reached the eastern coast of Africa, it has to be a kick start to globalization?

Global means global indeed.

It is a start, and it reveals the mettle of Chinese citizenism. Their blobbing uppificationism expanded to the exterior as far as their knowledge of the globe carried them.

As an ancient parable from Chinese citizenism fabled past says, "a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single crap along the roadside."

Fantasy, here we come.

It is easier to understand why fantasy works sold as fantasy works by US citizens are so poor in quality.

Yes, very much in agreement. Fantasy works sold as fantasy works by Chinese citizenism citizens are much higher quality due to opiation.

 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 05:31 | 2350769 falak pema
falak pema's picture

the Mongol regime of Kublai, in 1271, when Marco Polo was heading in the other  direction, sent ships from Southern China to Burma and India. So the Chinese navy was very active even then. In 1271, Marco Polo's uncles go to Hormuz and try and catch a boat from Persian gulf to India/Burma; in the hope of then taking the Chinese ships they know are already active on those trade routes, from talking to Khan Aqaba , Ilkhanate Lord of Mongol horde in Persia, and which will take them north to Badu/Xanadu, Kublai's new capitals where they are expected on Kublai's express invitation as per previous voyage.

But they give up their Maritime venture and double back from Hormuz when they see the state of the Persian vessels at port which they esteem unseaworthy. They decide to abandon the sea route and take the land route via Balkh (Bactria) through the Afghan pass to Xinkiang via Kashgar and Tarim Basin. The Ilkhanate leader Abaqa gave Marco Polo's caravan the golden gerege to allow safe passage wherever the Mongol horse was master of the lands. It led them to Badu and Xanadu in around 1274/1275. 

So Chinese navy was pretty awesome under Mongols. Just saying...The chinese had vessels comparabe to the venetian galleys then. 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 11:15 | 2351492 earleflorida
earleflorida's picture

excellent history

thanks

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 22:13 | 2350356 Prometheus418
Prometheus418's picture

When they get a little older, keep them going with Clavell's Shogun, Tai-Pan and King Rat. (Didn't think the rest of his Asian saga was that compelling, personally)

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:04 | 2350017 DormRoom
DormRoom's picture

where's the part where globalization ended in a world war (WWI)?

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 21:23 | 2350258 Diet Coke and F...
Diet Coke and Floozies's picture

Shame it only goes to 1850...

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:07 | 2350024 i-dog
i-dog's picture

There is a BIG difference between global trade (free market exchanges) and globalization (central planner protection of multinational corporations).

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 03:37 | 2350713 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

How could it not be that way? It has to be different.

Because globalization that has been so unambiguously profitable to US citizens so far can not be the same thing as that things that start to hit at some US citizens, making them angry...

Just like capitalism indeed. It cant be capitalism if...

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 09:46 | 2351144 i-dog
i-dog's picture

You're not over-bright, are you?! Now you know why they call you "Chinese lantern" in your village!

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 11:30 | 2351587 TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

i-dog said:

You're not over-bright, are you?! Now you know why they call you "Chinese lantern" in your village!

Ah, but his brain burns bright on the weekends thanks to spending time breathing in the sweetsmoke of Peoples Liberation Opium Parlor wifi hotspot.

At that place he wears Uncle Sam costume to be promote the advocating US citizenism to his neighbourhood downthere.

 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 05:05 | 2350763 BorisTheBlade
BorisTheBlade's picture

If there was ever a free market, it would be much more localized or regionalized than the current system. "Global" trade is really resting upon shoulders of US Navy and control over flow of oil through sea routes. There would be no global trade to speak of if not for the collaterization of US dollar by oil and military projection. Global trade = Sea based empire.

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:17 | 2350045 rlouis
rlouis's picture

Didn't see the British-India-China opium shipment, or opium wars represented.  But interesting to note the rise of Germany as a player in the world's oceans, threatening Britain's claim as master of the seas. 

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:32 | 2350066 _underscore
_underscore's picture

About as interesting as watching paint dry. I'm really not sure what can be drawn from this - lots of ships moving between ports, heck (surprise, surprise..) there's even some seasonaility (would you credit it - people import/export in season, or according to weather/sea conditions). Even more gobsmacking is the implication that some countries rise in economic power whilst others decline & that as new resources are found & become economically important - the more they're shipped!! There may even be a relationship between (and hold you hats here..) the number of people in the world & total trade/commerce going on!!

 Tell me - what do you really think 'globalisation' means?  erm.. that the whole world trades & that this gradually increases as populations grow & societies develop? Yes - top marks!! Grade A student. The only surprising thing is that some academic institutions have enough spare cash to indulge such insightful research.

 

 

Tue, 04/17/2012 - 00:24 | 2350526 earleflorida
earleflorida's picture

Timeline of Aternate Energy: 2000 bc, china using coal as energy - that can't be right...

200 bc, china develops natural gas [i won't dare mention who invented [alchemist?] gun powder in 9th century]

http://www.alternativeenergy.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=002475

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:31 | 2350067 Bill D. Cat
Bill D. Cat's picture

Las Vegas would have been pretty cool if you built it on the southern tip of Africa , back in the day .

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:40 | 2350085 max2205
max2205's picture

Ricky Ricardo system.... Lucy!!!!!!!

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:44 | 2350100 Dr. Engali
Dr. Engali's picture

That's pretty cool. I'd like to see this leading through WWII.

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 20:43 | 2350193 Amish Hacker
Amish Hacker's picture

Nice. I think that image may have been a Time magazine cover, back in the day.

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 23:42 | 2350476 slewie the pi-rat
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if phil can copyright "threePeat" zeroHedge should grab:  "theTimeLapse0fTheCollapse"

zH and tyler present:  the time lapse of the collapse, BiCheZ! 

can we speed this up just a bit, tyler?  jeeeeeeze!  L0L!

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!