Venezuela Completes Repatriation Of 160 Tons Of Gold, Gold At 2012 Highs

Tyler Durden's picture

Slowly but surely, ever more physical gold is being removed from circulation in conventional channels. Yesterday, it was Sprott who a week after doing a follow on offering in his PSLV ETF (i.e., adding more physical), reported that he was going to buy an as of yet undisclosed amount of gold for PHYS. This came just as Venezuela completed the rapatriation of its gold from European vaults, which means that it is substantially ahead of all of its other international peers who confidently continue to hold their gold stashed away in vaults situated primarily in London and NY. From Bloomberg: "Venezuela today received the last shipment of gold bars in an operation that repatriated 160 tons of the South American country’s reserves of the metal held abroad, said Nelson Merentes, president of the country’s central bank. Fourteen tons of gold arrived at the Caracas airport today on a flight from Europe, Merentes said. The gold bars were transported in a caravan, broadcast on state television, to vaults at the central bank where street banners proclaimed “Mission Complete.”" So now that the defections in the golden game theory equilibrium have commenced, the question is: who is next?

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“In two months, we’ve brought 160 tons of gold valued at around $9 billion back to Venezuela,” Merentes said on state television from the Caracas airport. “Today marks the last day of the mission.”

 

President Hugo Chavez in August ordered the central bank to repatriate the country’s gold reserves as a safeguard against instability in financial markets. The South American country, which has the 15th-largest holdings in the world, according to the World Gold Council, held 211 tons of its 365 tons of gold reserves in U.S., European and Canadian banks as of August.

 

Venezuela will leave about 15 percent of its reserves, or around 50 tons, outside of Venezuela for financial transactions, Merentes said today. He said on Jan. 3 that the country would leave 15 tons of gold in banks outside the country.

 

A central bank report released in August showed that Venezuela held gold reserves with the Bank of England, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Barclays Plc and Standard Chartered Plc among other banks.

 

“This was the largest type of operation to transport this type of metal in the last fifteen years,” said Merentes. “The repatriation of our gold was an act of financial prudence and sovereignty.”

How peculiar: a central banker really doing the prudent thing and betting on his own hard assets. And in Venezuela of all places.

Gold spikes on this, and other, news to $1745 - fresh 2012 highs, and about $170 below all time highs.