• williambanzai7
    01/25/2015 - 14:27
    A Banzai7 salute to the Greeks for signaling the bankster $hitheads of the world (and their Eurocrat enablers) to shove it where the sun don't shine.

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Initial Claims Flatline Despite NY And Penn. Getting 'Back To Work'

It seems some sense of normality has returned to the initial claims numbers, if that could ever be the case, as NY and Penn saw initial claims  drop 11,295 and 11,247 respectively this week. However, this 22,000-plus improvement was not enough to stall the rest of the nation as we saw a 17,000 rise in initial claims over last month. This week's data remains below the year's average, though not by much, and the trend of claims falling appears to have almost entirely stalled this year from the hope-driven moves of the previous two years.



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N-ICE N-ICE Baby: ICE Buys NYSE For $33.12 In $8.2 Billion Deal

Just about a year after the failed attemped by the Deutsche Bourse to acquire the NY Stock Exchange, we get a friendly reminder that stock trading is a dying business, and venues that engage in it must consolidate or die. Sure enough, moments ago the Intercontinental Exchange, or ICE, announced it would acquire the NYSE for $33.12 or roughly $8.2 billion in stock and cash.

  • ICE TO BUY NYSE EURONEXT FOR $33.12-SHR IN STOCK, CASH
  • ICE PACT IS FOR ABOUT 67% SHRS, 33% CASH
  • INTERCONTINENTALEXCHANGE TO ACQUIRE NYSE FOR ABOUT $8.2 BLN
  • ICE TO FUND CASH IN DEAL WITH CASH ON HAND, EXISTING CREDIT
  • NYSE EURONEXT HOLDERS TO OWN ABOUT 36% OF ICE SHRS POST DEAL
  • ICE SAYS NIEDERAUER TO BE PRESIDENT COMBINED CO, CEO NYSE GROUP

It is unclear if the combined exchange will be called N-ICE.



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China: "Rebound Is Based On Stimulus, Not Real Strength"

Confirming what we all know, here is Bloomberg's "most improved for 2012" (in our humble opinion) commentator, Michael McDonough, on China: "Fiscal stimulus has bought China’s new leadership time to pass critical reforms to spur domestic consumption and rebalance the economy, though there is little room for error. Central banks from U.S. to Japan, through unprecedented levels of quantitative easing, are influencing global markets more than ever. Concerns have arisen over China’s manufacturing sector losing competitiveness; companies including Apple and General Electric have moved some manufacturing lines back to the U.S." The Bloomberg Brief note continues: "Growth in China, which is currently being supported by government fiscal stimulus targeting infrastructure investment, will probably remain between 7.5 and 8 percent. This will buy time for the new leadership to continue with reforms, including interest-rate liberalization, designed to help stoke final demand in China and properly rebalance the nation’s economy."



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Silver To Gain 29% In 2013 - Analysts, Traders And Investors

Silver will rise as much as 29% to $40.25/oz, from $31.10/oz today, in 2013. This is based on the median estimate of 49 analysts, traders and investors compiled by Bloomberg. Global investment through silver backed exchange traded products reached a record 18,854 metric tons in November, or more than nine months of mine output, data compiled by Bloomberg show. Holdings are now valued at about $19.2 billion. Bullion dealers all over the world report robust demand for silver and there has been a shift in many Asian and Middle Eastern markets from gold to silver - due to silver's relative cheapness and undervaluation versus gold. According to Bloomberg, one of Singapore’s largest suppliers of coins and bars to retail investors, says sales tripled since October, part of a global surge in demand for silver that drove holdings to a record.



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Frontrunning: December 20

  • IMF Demands Partial Default for Cyprus (Spiegel)
  • Boehner's 'Plan B' Gets Pushback (WSJ)
  • Beijing criticises US ‘political checks’ (FT)
  • White House Said to Tell Business Groups Talks Stall (BBG)
  • NYSE tries to get hitched again: IntercontinentalExchange in talks to buy NYSE (Reuters) -> N-Ice coming?
  • Greece faces ‘make or break’ year (FT)
  • Fed rejects idea of consensus forecasts, "maybe forever": Fisher (Reuters)
  • Rajoy Drives Spanish Revolution With Low-Cost Manufacture (BBG)
  • Italian Senate Set for Budget Vote Before Monti Resigns (BBG)
  • BOJ Loosens With Pledge to Review Inflation Objectives (BBG)
  • Bowing To Abe, BOJ To Review Price Goal (WSJ)


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RANsquawk EU Market Re-Cap - 20th December 2012



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BOJ's QE10 Is Latest Japanese Dud Ahead Of The US Cliffhanger

Very much in keeping with the tradition of Japan's now monthly QE8 (September) and QE9 (October), last night's announcement of what is effectively QE10, left a bitter taste in the mouth of salivating habitual gamblers (f/k/a traders), after Shirakawa showed he would not bend over to Abe's political demands just yet, and left out any mention of inflation targeting, whether 2% or 3%, out of the QE10 announcement. What he did include was yet another JPY 10 billion increase in the total asset purchase fund to a total of JPY 76 trillion, increasing the size of eligible JGB and Bill purchases by JPY 5 billion each. However, since this approach has proven to be a total failure in recent months, the market immediately faded the move and the USDJPY tumbled to under 84.00 overnight. Of course, this an all other overnight news items are, of course, completely irrelevant, as the market now observes the Cliffhanger drama in what may be its last day. As we expected several days ago, if the GOP indeed proceeds to vote Plan B in the House today (and is subsequently voted down by the Senate), you can drop any hope of a compromise deal in 2012.



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Who Will Keep The German, And Thus Europe's, Economy Running?

After a significant slowdown in the years before the crisis, Goldman Sachs notes that the number of immigrants coming to Germany is rising strongly again. While it is not clear at this point how sustainable this development is, it will nonetheless help to ease the strains in the German labour market. But, given the underlying demographics, we suspect, like Goldman, that an increase in immigration by itself is unlikely to prevent a meaningful decline in the labour force after 2020. Only a continuous rise in the participation rate can offset these demographic trends.



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An Hour In The Company Of Kyle Bass

Last year's AmeriCatalyst interview with Kyle Bass provided much more color than the normal 30-second soundbites that we are subjected to when serious hedge fund managers are exposed to mainstream media. This year, Bass was the keynote speaker and in the following speech (followed by Q&A), the fund manager provides 60 minutes of eloquence on the end of the grand experiment and its consequences. From Money Printing and Central Bank Balance sheets to Japan and the psychology of the current situation - which in many cases trumps the quantitative data - the question remains, "when will this unravel" as opposed to "if?"; Bass provides his fact-based heresy against the orthodoxy of economic thought "On The Financial Nature Of Things" extending well beyond his recent note. Must watch (there's no football or X-Factor on tonight).Make sure to stay tuned to the last 2 minutes when Kyle succinctly sums up our society...

 



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Things That Make you Go Hmmm - Such As A Fake Tan... Or A Centrally-Planned Fake Market

Bernanke and his fellow Beltway insiders continue to apply fake tan in an attempt to make the US economy look more healthy than it is, but even though the public has been in love with the bronze monetary sheen that has been sprayed onto a decidedly pasty economy repeatedly since 2008, the backlash is picking up steam and broadening its reach. As Grant Williams discusses in this week's 'Things That Make You Go Hmmm...', from QE4's lack of 'pop' to Foodstamp Nation and the fundamental deterioration in our economy, the divergence between reality and the beauty-is-skin-deep appeal of the markets can only end one way and the earnings picture lights that up better than any other. For a little bit of everything, the newsletter below provides something for everyone.



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It Really Is Different (Again) This Time

Despite the seemingly generational destruction to household and bank balance sheets and an entirely unprecedented fiscal and monetary policy reponse, investors would never know it given the market's reactions from the 2009 lows relative to its rally from the 2003 lows. Different this time? hhmmm... Worried about gold prices falling also? Doesn't look like we learned anything from the 'Debt Ceiling' debate either...



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Guest Post: Santa, Please Let This Be the Last Christmas in America That 'Saves' The U.S. Economy

Our Christmas wish to Santa: please let this be the last Christmas in America that is dominated by the propaganda that holiday retail sales have any more impact on the $15.8 trillion U.S. economy than a moldy, half-eaten fruitcake left over from 2009.

 



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Global Religion, By The Numbers

Worldwide, more than eight-in-ten people identify with a religious group. A comprehensive demographic study of more than 230 countries and territories conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life estimates that there are 5.8 billion religiously affiliated adults and children around the globe, representing 84% of the 2010 world population of 6.9 billion. These five charts sum up the age, size, geography, and power of the world's major religions.



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Guest Post: What Causes Hyperinflations And Why We Have Not Seen One Yet

What causes hyperinflations? The answer is: Quasi-fiscal deficits (A quasi-fiscal deficit is the deficit of a central bank)! Why have we not seen hyperinflation yet? Because we have not had quasi-fiscal deficits! Essentially, hyperinflation is the ultimate and most expensive bailout of a broken banking system, which every holder of the currency is forced to pay for in a losing proposition, for it inevitably ends in its final destruction. Hyperinflation is the vomit of economic systems: Just like any other vomit, it’s a very good thing, because we can all finally feel better. We have puked the rotten stuff out of the system.



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The Ultimate Valuation Matrix For Global Stocks

Wondering where to place your hard-earned cash next year? Feel like playing the global game of equity market Russian Roulette? The following matrix covering every sector in all developed country stock markets provides just the color you need. Based on price-to-book, US and German stocks are, in aggregate, the most expensive; and EM and South Korea are cheapest currently relative to historical P/B. Oil & Gas seem the cheapest sector overall (on the P/B basis) while Retail, Real Estate, Media, and Tobacco sectors appear richest.



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