• GoldCore
    04/24/2014 - 11:48
    Silver coins with the face of Russian President Vladimir Putin are being minted in Russia. The coins weigh one kilogram (1kg - 2.2lb) and are being launched by the Art Grani foundry to mark Crimea’s...

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Frontrunning: September 27

  • Last week's key story , conveniently buried late on Friday: "Three Wholesale Credit Unions Nationalized As US Securitizes $50 Billion In Legacy Toxic Assets; Failure "Sweep Under The Rug" Friday Just Got Real" - (Zero Hedge)
  • From media shy to publicity whore, book-talker extraordinaire, David Tepper is now everywhere (New York Mag Profile)
  • China Imposes a Steep Tariff on U.S. Poultry (NYT)
  • Gold is the final refuge against universal currency debasement (Ambrose Evans-Pritchard)
  • Japan Looks At $55bn Stimulus Package (FT)
  • Fed Relative Value Model for Treasuries Showing Diminishing Market Returns (Bloomberg)
  • Wolfgang Munchau on why the European Rescue Facility (EFSF) is one
    bid CDO, and would collapse immediately if France is downgraded  (FT)
  • Eurozone banks face test as loans expire (FT)
  • Interview: Marc Faber on the Federal Reserve and Hyperinflation (Seeking Alpha)


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Daily Highlights: 9.27.2010

  • Asian stocks rise to five-month high on US capital goods.
  • Brazil crops shrivel as Amazon dries up to lowest in 47 years.
  • Europe’s central banks halt gold sales; run of large disposals ends.
  • Euro trades close to 5-month high against dollar, buys $1.3469.
  • Eurozone annual M3 money-supply growth grew at a 1.1% in August vs. 0.2% in July.
  • German business confidence rose unexpectedly in September.
  • Germany backs tough EU deficit rules.
  • Gold may advance to record on weaker dollar; Silver climbs to 30-year high.
  • Japan said to consider up to $55B extra stimulus as recovery slows.


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Today's Economic Data Highlights

Boring day, with just Dallas Fed on the roster.



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Moody's Downgrades Unguaranteed Senior Debt Of Anglo Irish Bank By Three Notches To Baa3 From A3

Ireland wakes up to some very ugly news this morning: "Moody's expects a continued asset quality deterioration in the loan book of Anglo Irish that will require further government support for the bank's liabilities," says Ross Abercromby, Vice President and lead analyst for Anglo Irish at Moody's. The rating agency believes that the novation of the deposits into the FB could increase the government's options to share the burden of such support with other creditors that remain in the ARB. Without an explicit government guarantee for senior unsecured note holders, Moody's believes that the ratings for these instruments need to incorporate this greater marginal risk. While Moody's considers the likelihood of the government not supporting this debt to be very small, this risk has been reflected in the three-notch downgrade to Baa3 and will continue to be a focus of the review for possible downgrade. Moody's expects to receive further clarity from (a) the Irish government's upcoming announcement of further details of its plans for Anglo Irish over the coming weeks, and (b) the European Commission's verdict on the proposed restructuring. Until such clarification is forthcoming, Moody's review for possible downgrade will continue. "In the absence of explicit government guarantees, the senior unsecured debt ratings could be further downgraded into sub-investment grade," says Mr. Abercromby.



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RANsquawk European Morning Briefing - Stocks, Bonds, FX etc. – 27/09/10

RANsquawk European Morning Briefing - Stocks, Bonds, FX etc. – 27/09/10



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Here They Come: Thousands Of JPMorgan Home Foreclosures In Doubt After (Perjurious) Firm Exec Confirms Loan Docs Were Not Verified

First one, now all. Just as we predicted - fan: meet feces.



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Central Banks No Longer Selling Gold (Duh Factor: 10/10)

Something funny (and quite revolutionary) happened during the CBGA's (Central Bank Gold Agreement) year ending this Sunday - the group of 15 signatory banks sold a mere 6.2 tonnes of gold, a massive 96% decline from the year earlier, according to provisional data.This means that unlike in the past, when it was central banker prerogative #1 to sell some gold and every year just to keep all the longs on their toes, this year the trend has finally changed. As the FT reports, "the sales are the lowest since the agreement was signed in 1999 and well below the peak of 497 tonnes in 2004-05." And yes, we do love the FT's brilliant summation of the change in mindset: "In the 1990s and 2000s, central banks swapped their non-yielding
bullion for sovereign debt, which gives a steady annual return. But now,
central banks and investors are seeking the security of gold." Hm, when all of Europe (as well as America) is a smoldering heap of bearer bonds that will never get paid, and China is putting up a building today, only to blow it up yesterday, and boast a GDP growth rate of one gajillion, the FT may want to change the bolded assumption. Back to the Captain Obvious narrative of the original article: "The lack of heavy selling is important for gold prices both because a
significant source of supply has been withdrawn from the market, and
because it has given psychological support to the gold price. On Friday,
bullion hit a record of $1,300 an ounce." So market zero supply, and demand that is growing exponentially, means higher prices, eh? All those Voodoo 101 classes, and Poison Ivy college loans sure are paying off in droves...



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Why Contrary To Popular Opinion Gridlock Would Be A Catastrophe; Is Obama More Like Clinton Or Bush

Some entertaining observations from BofA's Ethan Harris, who describes in detail why there are 500 billion reasons why gridlock would cripple the economy, and asks whether Obama is (or should be) more like Clinton or Bush in dealing with the approaching deadlines that will result in the first openly negative GDP print as soon as Q3 (good luck justifying thoat 10% EPS growth when the economy is about to decline). And just to confirm how bad it is, Jan Hatzius chimes in to explain why the economy will face a nearly 2% point headwind from inventory liquidation and negative fiscal catch up (think Cash For Clunkers gone viral) nearly every quarter in the coming year.



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Takefuji, Third Largest Japanese Consumer Lender, Halted, To File Bankruptcy

Takefuji Corp., the third largest Japanese consumer lender, was limit down on the Nikkei, and was subsequently halted, on reports the company is preparing to file bankruptcy as reported by Nikkei newspaper earlier. The news was also confirmed by the Jiji and Kyodo news agencies. According to Reuters, "Takefuji had 430 billion yen ($5.11 billion) in liabilities as of the end of June, the Nikkei business daily reported, adding that president Akira Kiyokawa would step down." Apparently the reason is that according to Japanese "consumer protection" banks are limited to the paltry 20% they can charge for interest: "Japanese consumer lenders have been struggling to cope with regulations lowering the rates they can charge on loans as well as claims for reimbursement for past interest deemed illegally high by a court ruling in 2006. In June a new set of regulations cemented the interest rate ceiling at 20 percent, down from 29.2 percent, and limited the amount an individual can borrow." Nonetheless, the filing will likely not be a major surprise as even Moody's appears to have been on the case.



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China: Proudly Demolishing Buildings Before Completed In Pursuit Of The Glorious Housing Bubble Perpetual Engine

Ever wonder how China can endlessly generate goal-seeked GDP of precisely 8.00001% year after year? Or how it can constantly find use for the massive and ever-larger surplus of warehoused commodities? Simple - never stop building. Which, apparently means blowing up empty building before they are even finished and rebuilding them. Rinse. Repeat. After all gotta keep all those construction workers from rioting, and all those USD reserves redirected into Brazilian and OZ commodities, now that China is not really buying US debt anymore. China Hush has some stunning pictures confirming that in its search of the great home bubble perpetual engine, the politbureau comrades may have stumbled onto the bricks and mortar equivalent of Shangri La.



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Guest Post: Correlation Of Mortgage Rates With Real Housing Prices II

My last post "Correlation of mortgage rates with real housing prices: how increasing inflation could affect housing prices", raised some questions. I didn't have the chance to respond to them. But before I do, let me go back to the original purpose of the article. I asked the question, "What could happen to real estate in the event of higher inflation?" If inflation shot up from 1% to 7%, what would happen to the real value of your home. My thesis was: you're screwed. You will lose what little equity you have and real housing prices could drop by as high as 50%. - Taylor Cottam



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A Look At Global Economic Events In The Upcoming Week

A busy economic week awaits, full of completely irrelevant data, as the market will ramp on any news. Among the completely irrelevant highlights are the prelim September ISM, PCE Core inflation, Case Shiller, Consumer Confidence, China and global PMI, BOJ's Tankan, a whole lot of central bank meetings which will lead to even more central bank interventions, and, thus, even more completely irrelevant future economic data, now that nobody but the CBs are left trading.



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Further Confirmation On The Irrelevance Of Stock Markets

Simply said, nobody is trading... and it is causing massive pain for parasite volume-churning traders and HFT firms.



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Guest Post: A Plan for Synthetic Fuel Stimulus

It is time for the United States to embark on a serious effort to develop a synthetic fuels program. In 1979, Americans imported 30% of our oil. Now that figure is 60% and growing. This raises a national security crisis that we have blissfully ignored, as the price of crude continues to inflate and our enemies grow stronger, financed by our own petrodollars. There has never been an example of a nation so powerful being willing to place its economic life in the hands of so many hostile powers, while denying itself the natural resources within its own borders. To wit: The U.S. has more energy in coal than all of Saudi Arabia has in oil. We float on a lake of natural gas and swim in a sea of agriculture: grain, corn, switchgrass — the three main substances from which we can create all the synthetic fuels our country needs.



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POMO And Market Intervention: A Primer

With FRBNY Brian Sack's Permanent Open Market Operations (POMO) now firmly back on the scene, and by all appearances about to grow orders of magnitude larger than the prevailing $10 billion a week levels following implementation of QE2, we have been bombarded by requests to explain the methodology behind what the 10:15 am - 11:00 am liquidity intervention by the Fed means in terms of asset prices. We recently presented Nic Lenoir's observations on how POMO impacts rates on an intraday basis. However, the most comprehensive report on the issue comes courtesy of Bob English as the Precision Report. His analysis titled A Grand Unified Theory on Market Manipulation is a must read for everyone who dares to trade ahead of the Fed on POMO days (which, incidentally, this week will be on Tuesday and Thursday). While the report is as of August 2009, the logic behind it is as relevant and applicable today as it was when first written.



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