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Scotia Mocatta Loses 60% Of Its Physical Silver In One Month To "Reclassification", Total Comex Registered Silver Now Under 30 Million...

About a month ago we indicated that Comex depository Scotia Mocatta "lost" 25% of its Registered (aka Physical) silver after the vault encountered a "reporting reclassification" which saw 5,287,142 ounces of silver moved from Registered to Eligible status, dropping the vault's true holdings from 11.8 million ounces to 6.5 million. Naturally, the response from the peanut gallery was that this was a tempest in a teacup and it was "temporary" and a-ha, any minute it would reverse, and all shall be well, everyone would live happily ever after, and the Comex would actually have silver available for delivery purposes. We decided to not hold our breath. Which after pulling today's most recent Comex warehouse data appears to have been a prudent decision, because for the first time ever total registered silver has dropped below 30 million ounces, after experiencing a 5% overnight drop across the board, primarily driven by yet another 1,456,488 ounce "adjustment" of warehoused silver from Registered To Eligible at Scotia Mocatta. As of last night, total Scotia physical silver was now 4,740,447 ounces, a 24% drop overnight, and a massive 60% drop from the total which we captured on April 20. Still think it's temporary?



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Guest Post: Remember The Can't Lose, First Day Of The Month Trade?

It was big news last year when someone pointed out that 134 out of 143 S&P 500 points came on the first day of the month.  10 of 12 first days of the month in 2010 were positive.  Everyone was chattering about how great it was to go long ahead of the first day of the month.  This culminated in a nice 14 point gain on January 1 after a couple weeks of little movement.  By January 28th, an otherwise down day, the talking heads were kept bouyant by the prospects of big gains to be had the following Tuesday.  The market didn't disappoint and jumped 21 points on the first of February.  In spite of the hype going into March 1st the S&P saw a 21 point sell off.  That move seemed to take the wind out of the sails of that 'easy trade' and although we moved up 7 points on April 1st, On May 2nd we slipped 2 points and today we got slammed 31 points.  Now for the year we are down 12 points in total on the first trading day of the month.  Sadly, by the time my mother heard about on all the financial channels and started trading, she down 48 points.  So much for easy money.



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E-Mini 100 DMA Support Breached

The bullish chartist and Johnny 5 portion of the stock market (which is about 99%) can not be happy: the next ES support is at the swing low of 1241.25, although the 200 DMA looks like a target at 1237.85. We believe a firm bottom exists at 400. And for all those asking, today's ES volume was the 2nd highest since March.



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JPM Lowers Q2 GDP For Second Time In A Week, Warns Of A "Severe Downgrade" To Forecast In Case Of A Technical Default (No, Really)

And to think they cut it from 3% to 2.5% just a week ago. Michael Feroli, take it away: "When we revised down our estimate of Q2 GDP growth last week to 2.5% we noted that the risks to this quarter were still to the downside. Given the hard activity data we've received since then -- particularly the auto sales and construction report -- it looks like those downside risks are being realized, and we are lowering our Q2 projection to 2.0%. Even with this revision we'd assess the risks as still a little to the downside. Most of our downward revision in Q2 is located in consumer spending, where we think growth this quarter is tracking close to 1.5%. If our new estimate for Q2 is realized, GDP growth relative to a year-ago would be only 2.4%, implying almost no closing of the output gap over the past year -- an abysmal performance given that the output gap is arguably greater than 5% of potential GDP, or less arguably, that there are still almost 14 million unemployed workers. Our forecast implicitly assumes the debt ceiling issue is resolved in a manner which does not see a technical default of the US Treasury. Of course if that assumption were not to hold all cards would be off the table and we almost certainly have to pencil in a much more severe downgrade to our growth forecast. Our Fed call is unchanged and continues to look for a first hike in 1Q13."



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"This Is Your Friendly Goldman Sachs Prime Broker Margin Call"

"Please sell anything that is not nailed down. Thank you. Oh yes, your invite to this year's Christmas elves party is in the mail"



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/ES Vol Spikes: Time For A Margin Hike

15 Day realized vol double in last 6 week. 30 Day at 5 week high. 90 Day near highs of year. And just because the CME Group is so concerned about investors and their money, this is precisely the time for an ES margin hike. (Yes, we know, the irony would be priceless.)But we jest: just hike those SI and CL margins already. Nobody can see that coming.



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Moody's Downgrades Greece To Just A Few Notches Above Default: From B1 To Caa1, Outlook Negative

Next up: Greece begins criminal proceedings against the rating agency for character defamantion and libel (or is that slander?). Also, Belgium is next. Yet most importantly, there is no mention in the downgrade if the "Vienna plan" currently contemplated, or the latest zany "debt rolling" proposal constitutes an Event Of Default, meaning the market will have even more uncertaintly to grapple with. From Moody's "The main triggers for today's downgrade are as follows: 1. The increased risk that Greece will fail to stabilise its debt position, without a debt restructuring, in light of (1) the ever-increasing scale of the implementation challenges facing the government, (2) the country's highly uncertain growth prospects and (3) a track record of underperformance against budget consolidation targets. 2. The increased likelihood that Greece's supporters (the IMF, ECB and the EU Commission, together known as the "Troika") will, at some point in the future, require the participation of private creditors in a debt restructuring as a precondition for funding support. Taken together, these risks imply at least an even chance of default over the rating horizon. Moody's points out that, over five-year investment horizons, around 50% of Caa1-rated sovereigns, non-financial corporate and financial institutions have consistently met their debt service requirements on a timely basis, while around 50% have defaulted."



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China Prepares To Export More Inflation Back To US As It Announces Hikes In Commercial Electricity Prices

So much for the interesting theory presented a few days back from Bernstein that one contrarian response from China to its electricity shortage problem is not to hike prices but instead to slow down its economy by pushing the margin producers out and allow the economy to slow down on its own. As a reminder, last Friday Bernstein analysts Parket and Leung, in discussing the 30 gigawatt power shortage currently gripping China, was the following: "a nationwide power price increase to alleviate the problem is not likely. Letting the current stand-off run its course – in the worst case scenario, allowing electricity shortages and the high price of fuel substitutes to force factories to shut down - would slow the economy. And that's the key point in our view: increasing electricity prices is inflationary while holding prices steady would achieve the NDRC's current economic goals." Alas, China has opted for the convention path, and as Business China reports, "China will raise prices for electricity used for industrial, commercial and agricultural purposes to curb demand from energy-intensive industries and encourage power generators to increase electricity supplies." Sigh - add more inflation, more resultant PBoC tightening, and more of the same dog chasing its tail failed policies that will lead the world's fastest growing economy nowhere fast.



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Prepared Testimony By Fed's General Counsel To Be Used In Today's Ron Paul Hearing

Update: Hearing has been delayed until 3 pm.

While we await to find and bring to our readers the channel that will carry today's hearing between the House Financial Services Committee on the topic of "Federal Reserve Lending Disclosure: FOIA, Dodd-Frank, and the Data Dump" chaired by Ron Paul and Fed and NY Fed General Counsels, Thomas C. Baxter, Jr., and Scott G. Alvarez, below we present their prepared testimony that was just released by the New York Fed. The key section from the testimony: "We remain concerned that a more rapid release of information about borrowers accessing the discount window and emergency lending facilities could impair the ability of the Federal Reserve to provide the liquidity needed to ensure the smooth working of the financial system. If institutions believe that publication of their use of Federal Reserve lending facilities will impair public confidence in the institution, then institutions may choose not to participate in these facilities. Experience has shown that banks’ unwillingness to use the discount window can result in more volatile short-term interest rates and reduced financial market liquidity that, in turn, can contribute to declining asset prices and reduced lending to consumers and small businesses." Luckily, courtesy of $1.6 trillion in excess reserves, and the stigma now associated with Discount Window borrowings, for everyone except for Dexia, we doubt the Fed will ever have to worry about the discount window before the banking kleptoracy blows itself up once again.



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Richard Koo Calls For, Surprise, More Reconstruction Stimulus To Prevent Japan's Natural Disaster From Becoming A Man-Made Calamity

Richard Koo is back with his latest piece titled, not surprisingly, that "Fiscal Consolidation is Not the Answer" - alas, a decimated by (previously secret) debt European continent, and even America, is rapidly starting to disagree with this assessment, which stems from the faulty assumption that the economic "balance" achieved after 30 years of endless balance sheet expansion courtesy of ever declining interest rates is sustainable. Hint: it isn't. And until the world realizes that it is precisely this Fiscal Consolidation that is the answer, we will continue seeing bankers sell bits and pieces of Greece to each other, transfer payments in the US from the government ending up straight in Wall Street pockets, and broadly the Big getting Ever Bigger to Fail. Yet for those who still believe (Krugman) that one last hit is all it takes and after that it will be better, here is Koo's summary, on why Japan, which we continue to believe is the key macroeconomic variable over the near term, may be in very deep trouble unless it commences yet another (what number is that, #20, #50, is anyone even keeping score?) round of fiscal or monetary stimulus: "Fortunately for the Kan administration, Japanese institutional investors have been dealing with this surplus of private savings on a daily basis for more than 15 years and understand its macroeconomic implications. It is only because of their calm and calculated response to these conditions that the yield on 10-year JGBs remains at 1.2%. To prevent this natural disaster from becoming a man-made calamity (ie a recession), the government needs to push ahead with reconstruction efforts. With private savings surging, the necessary funds can be borrowed for now. Later, once businesses and households start looking to the future, funding can and should be shifted to tax hikes and budget reshuffles." That is the conventional wisdom. For all those who wish to read what will happen if and when Japan continues on this unsustainable path of converting private savings into public funding without regard for demographics, please read Dylan Grice (here, here and here).



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Tim Geithner Top Tick Op-Ed #2: "A Rescue Worth Fueling"

About a year after Tim Geithner literally top-ticked the economy with his first Op-Ed, "Welcome to the Recovery", which came days ahead of the QE 2 announcement, he has just released his Op-Ed #2 "A Rescue Worth Fueling" in the WaPo, in which he praises the administration for using billions in taxpayer capital to save a few hundred thousand union jobs. His bottom line: "The domestic automakers are getting stronger. For the first time since 2004, each has achieved positive quarterly net income." Perfect release timing: just as both GM and Ford announce a drop in monthly sales, and GM discloses record channel stuffing. If there is one call to fade and short all the US automakers, this is it.



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LNKD Touches All Time Low Of $75.82; Everyone Who Bought Post Break Is Now At A Loss

We really hope that the guy who bought LNKD at $122 on its first tday of trading has sold, because while one may debate the merits of gold and silver as an alternative currency to the infinitely dilutable linen/cotton contraption that has become enemy #1 of every central planner alive, there is absolutely no debating that LNKD is and will be nothing short of a dot com bubble until it drops to its fair value, somewhere 60% lower than current prices...where its fwd PE will be at most triple digits. Yet that will hardly be a consolation to LNKD longs: since everyone who got an allocation at the IPO has since sold, the entire LNKD long base (that has not booked a profit) is now at a loss.



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Guest Post: Outlaw Josey Wales - Part Four

At this point it looks bad for the working middle class and it looks
like they aren’t going to make it through the next banker made financial
crisis. The middle class just wants the chance for a new beginning.
They want jobs. They know the country has been hijacked by the banking
corporatocracy, supported by the corrupt political class in D.C. It is
time for the middle class to channel their inner Josey Wales and get
plumb mad-dog mean. It is not time to lose your head and give up. The
middle class are being pursued by Wall Street bounty hunters and
government crooks trying to finish them off. It is time to make a stand
and fight. It is essential that we know our enemies and how they
achieved their power. It all began in 1913 with the creation of the
Federal Reserve and the implementation of the personal income tax. I’ve
previously detailed how the baby boom generation contributed to our
fiscal plight in Part One – For a Few Dollars More,
how the actions of the Federal Reserve’s over the last few decades have
impoverished the middle class and placed the country at the brink of
collapse in Part Two – Fistful of Dollars and addressed the nefarious creation of a central bank in Part Three – The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.



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Deutsche Bank's Joe Lavorgna Cuts His NFP Forecast From 300,000 To 160,000 In Two Days

There is little we can add to what can only be classified as career suicide facilitated by terminal incompetence from one of CNBC's most beloved "economists" (in this case, naturally, Deutsche Bank's Joe LaVorgna), who just cut his NFP estimate from 300,000 to 160,000 in two days. From yesterday: "Our preliminary estimates were for +300k on payrolls and a three-tenths decline in the unemployment rate to 8.7%. However, in light of the softer tone of the data—particularly the inability of initial jobless claims to recover below 400k—we trimmed our projections. We lowered our May payroll estimate to +225k and raised our unemployment rate target to 8.9%." And from 10 minutes ago: "In light of the significant downside surprise in the ADP employment numbers earlier today, as well as the equally important slowdown in the ISM employment component, we are trimming our May nonfarm payroll projection to 160k from 225k as we previously estimated. We project private payrolls to increase 185k. We continue to anticipate a one-tenth decline in the unemployment rate to 8.9%."



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