Are Stocks Overvalued By $4+ Trillion? Quantifying The Fed's Impact On The Stock Market

A few months ago we penned an article titled: "Bond Yields Imply The Fair Value Of The S&P Is 750" and this was when the 10 Year was still above 3.00%. It is now around 40 bps tighter, meaning the fair value of stocks is even lower based on the historical 75% regression pattern we indicated back in June. Today, David Rosenberg also chimes in on this ridiculous divergence between the S&P and bonds, and in graphic form shows that should the gap ever close, it would lead the stock market to its fair value, which ironically, is just around the March 2009 lows of 666.

Folks — something has to give ... yields on the 2-year T-note (thin line, right hand side on chart below) has a 75% POSITIVE correlation with the S&P 500 and just hit a cycle low. Either it's a short or the equity market is ... take your pick.

As a reminder, historically bonds are right... about 100% of the time.

And with the S&P's market cap at $10.5 trillion, meaning each S&P point is equivalent to about $9 billion dollars, the impact of the Fed's intervention on stocks is roughly $4.4 trillion. Alterantively, one can argue that stocks are right, and bonds are wrong. Since the bond market is double the size of its smaller stock cousin, it would means that the Fed's endless interventions have mispriced just under $9 trillion worth of fixed income assets.

And people want to play in a market that is as ridiculously out of sync with reality as either of these?

Good luck.