Goodbye European Monetary Union, Hello Uncle Sam Bail Out: Greece Cost To IMF (And Pro Rata US Taxpayers) - $27 Billion

First, we have this from Goldman's Erik Nielsen this morning:

According to the Reuters story below, Merkel said this morning as a government declaration in front of the German parliament (ahead of the EU summit) that help to Greece would only come as the very last resort, and that it (bilateral help) would come ONLY in combination with the IMF.  Whether this was formally agreed yesterday by the Euro-zone heads of state remains uncertainly, but I think it is very likely.  If so, its just a matter of rubber stamping it in the full EU summit today, since none of the non-Eurozone EU members would object to the IMF being involved.
 
Erik

09:15 25Mar10 RTRS-MERKEL - ES WÄRE VERHÄNGNISVOLL, WENN DER STABILITÄTSPAKT AUFGEWEICHT WÜRDE
09:15 25Mar10 RTRS-MERKEL - RÜCKKEHR ZU SOLIDEN STAATSFINANZEN OHNE ALTERNATIVE
09:17 25Mar10 RTRS-MERKEL - UNTERLAUFEN DES STABILITÄTSPAKTES MUSS ZUKÜNFTIG UNTERBUNDEN WERDEN
09:17 25Mar10 RTRS-MERKEL - DEUTSCHLAND IST SICH SEINER HISTORISCHEN VERANTWORTUNG BEWUSST
09:18 25Mar10 RTRS-MERKEL - ZAHLUNGSUNFÄHIGKEIT EINES EURO-STAATES WÜRDE FÜR ALLE ANDEREN EURO-LÄNDER GRAVIERENDE RISIKEN BEDEUTEN
09:22 25Mar10 RTRS-MERKEL - MÜSSEN MECHANISMUS FESTLEGEN FÜR DEN FALL, DASS EURO-STAAT KEINEN ZUGRIFF AUF FINANZMÄRKTE MEHR HAT
09:23 25Mar10 RTRS-MERKEL - IM ÄUßERSTEN NOTFALL WÜRDEN WIR BILATERALE HILFEN IN KOMBINATION MIT IWF-GELDERN GEWÄHREN
09:42 25Mar10 RTRS-Merkel - Im Notfall Hilfe für Griechenland nur mit IWF

    Berlin, 25. Mär (Reuters) - Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel sperrt sich unmittelbar vor dem EU-Gipfel weiter gegen direkte Finanzhilfen der EU an das hochverschuldete Griechenland. Infrage kämen für die Bundesregierung im äußersten Notfall nur Hilfen des Internationalen Währungsfonds (IWF) in Kombination mit bilateralen Hilfen der Euro-Zone, sagte Merkel am Donnerstag in einer Regierungserklärung vor dem Bundestag in Berlin. Dies sei dann der Fall, wenn die Stabilität eines Landes gefährdet sei und es keinen Zugang mehr zu den internationalen Finanzmärkten gebe. "Aber ich sage nochmal: nur als Ultima Ratio", unterstrich die Kanzlerin. Sie werde beim Gipfel entschieden dafür eintreten, dass eine solche Lösung gelinge.

   Merkel unterstrich, Griechenland sei bislang nicht zahlungsunfähig. Das Land habe sich selbst ein ambitioniertes Sparprogramm auferlegt und zuletzt erfolgreich seine Anleihe an den Märkten platziert.

   Die Kanzlerin warnte, der europäische Stabilitäts- und Wachstumspakt dürfe nicht aufgeweicht werden. Deutschland sei sich seiner historischen Verantwortung bewusst. Die Zahlungsunfähigkeit eines einzelnen Landes stelle ein gravierendes Risiko für alle anderen Euro-Länder dar.

   Der Streit über Finanzhilfen für Griechenland sorgt seit Tagen für heftigen Streit in der EU. Die EU-Kommission und viele Euro-Länder fordern, die Solidaritätserklärung an Griechenland vom Sondergipfel im Februar durch einen konkreten Hilfsplan der Euro-Länder mit Leben zu erfüllen. Die Bundesregierung ist nur zu Hilfen bereit, wenn Griechenland sich an den Internationalen Währungsfonds wendet.

    (Reporter: Thorsten Severin; redigiert von Sören Amelang)

 

And then we have this from Erik from last night:

The much anticipated EU summit starts tomorrow and runs through Friday.  The agenda consists of discussions of employment (specifically the new strategy for jobs and growth that is to replace the Lisbon strategy), the economy (specifically the divergence in competitiveness and current accounts inside the EU; hot topic these days, but expect no agreement on anything), and climate change (a follow-up to Copenhagen, probably mostly focused on how Europe got so marginalised.)

In addition, the Greek crisis was supposed to be discussed at the summit – i.e. until (1) Merkel (supported by the Netherlands and Finland) called earlier this week for a more prominent role for the IMF, if help is required – a position sharply opposed (at least until now) by several countries, including France, the Commission and the ECB; and (2) the EU presidency (Spain), encouraged by France, called a pre-summit meeting today of the Euro-zone heads of state to address the now serious intra-European tensions on how to deal with Greece.  The point of today’s meeting was clearly to settle the issue of the IMF’s role ahead of the EU-wide summit, given that this would be the last opportunity for the leaders to discuss the matter before Greece might be running out of cash.  The Greek head of their debt office has said that they might be down at EUR7bn by the end of March.

If I am right on this, then a decision on Greece would most likely have been reached today, which means that an announcement could come already tonight, or relatively early tomorrow, Thursday, ahead of the EU summit.  And based on the news flows, one would have to expect that Merkel has gotten her way.  If so, this would constitute quite a defeat for what I have called the “fiscal federalists”.

In summary, I now expect a formal announcement by the EU - probably ahead of the formal EU summit tomorrow, Thursday - that if an Euro-zone member needs financial help, then the IMF will be asked to take the lead, both in terms of financing and with respect to policy conditionality.  Other EU countries might provide some co-financing like they have done to EU countries outside the Euro-zone, but this would be secondary.

It is not clear when Greece will formally approach the IMF, but it might happen within weeks, and very likely during the next few months.  I think negotiations – when they get under way – will focus on a program of about EUR20bn over 18 months.   Stay tuned.

Erik F. Nielsen
Chief European Economist
Goldman Sachs