Pictures From A Pelting - Icelanders Throw Eggs At PM, Priests, After Being Forced To Start Making Mortgage Payments

In an advance preview of what will happen in the US once tens of millions of "homeowners" are forced to actually start paying their mortgage bills, Iceland's disgruntled population "gathered in their thousands, beating makeshift drums and hurling red paint at the legislature." As Bloomberg further describes the festivities: "protestors lit a bonfire and threw firecrackers at police while others threw eggs, tomatoes and paint at the parliament as they tried to break through the steel fence protecting the building." And while 8,000 protesters seems like a de-minimis number, keep in mind it is 2.7% of the country total population, and would be equivalent to 9.5 million American lining up to throw rotten vegetables at Ben Bernanke. Seeing how not even one has done so ever, it appears the Volcano dwellers have infinitely more guts than their infinitely more weaponized American equivalents. As to what sparked the ire of the egg-throwers: "A six-month freeze on mortgage repayments put in place by the government expired on Thursday, triggering the anger of many Icelanders who will fall short on home payments." Perhaps when in a decade or so, Americans are once again forced to pay down their debts, we may actually see comparable footage in the US as well. Too bad the world's central banks will start a world war long before that (and yes, you can eat eggs).

And here are some pictures of various members of the Icelandic elite covered in yolk, from Daylife:

Iceland's First Lady Dorrit Moussaieff (2nd L), Prime Minister Johanna Sigurdardottir (3rd L), President of Parliament Asta R. Johannesdottir (4th L), Finance Minister Steingrimur Sigfusson (5th L), Foreign Minister Ossur Skarphedinsson (6th L) and other members of parliament walk to seek shelter as protesters fling dairy products during a rally outside Iceland's parliament in Reykjavik October 1, 2010. Around 2,000 people protested in front of parliament, voicing dissatisfaction with, among other things, a recent parliamentary vote that saw three of four ministers recommended for facing charges of negligence escaping any charges.

A reverend with eggs thrown by protesters on his coat walk outside Iceland's parliament in front of First Lady Dorrit Moussaieff (C) in Reykjavik October 1, 2010. Around 2,000 people protested in front of parliament, voicing dissatisfaction with, among other things, a recent parliamentary vote that saw three of four ministers recommended for facing charges of negligence escaping any charges.

Protesters gather around a fire during a rally outside Iceland's parliament in Reykjavik October 1, 2010. Around 2,000 people protested in front of parliament, voicing dissatisfaction with, among other things, a recent parliamentary vote that saw three of four ministers recommended for facing charges of negligence escaping any charges. The poster on right reads "Do banks' pension funds practice money laundering?", while the other reads, "Arrogance, stupidity, greed = collapse".

First Lady of Iceland Dorrit Moussaieff (C), the Bishop of Iceland Karl Sigurbjornsson (R) and a parliament staff watch from inside the parliament as protesters fling dairy products during a rally in Reykjavik October 1, 2010. Around 2,000 people protested in front of parliament, voicing dissatisfaction with, among other things, a recent parliamentary vote that saw three of four ministers recommended for facing charges of negligence escaping any charges.

Protesters gather outside Iceland's parliament as police officers look on in Reykjavik October 1, 2010. Around 2,000 people protested in front of parliament, voicing dissatisfaction with, among other things, a recent parliamentary vote that saw three of four ministers recommended for facing charges of negligence escaping any charges. The placard reads, "Kill Capitalism".

A security guard looks through a window broken by protesters in a cathedral in Reykjavik October 1, 2010. Around 2,000 people protested in front of Iceland's parliament, voicing dissatisfaction with, among other things, a recent parliamentary vote that saw three of four ministers recommended for facing charges of negligence escaping any charges.

Iceland's Prime Minister Johanna Sigurdardottir tries to shield herself from food products thrown by protesters outside the parliament in Reykjavik October 1, 2010. Around 2,000 people protested in front of parliament, voicing dissatisfaction with, among other things, a recent parliamentary vote that saw three of four ministers recommended for facing charges of negligence escaping any charges.