Treasury Refunding Upside "Surprise", Q2 Borrowing Higher Than Previous Estimate By $71 Billion, Sees September Debt Of $13.6 Trillion

Today the Treasury issued its quarterly Treasury Refunding statement in which it announced that previous estimate for Q2 borrowing were woefully below expectations. We are confident none of our readers are "surprised" by this development, although seeing how it is an "upside" surprise it will be further evidence of the benevolent decoupling of the US economy from the world. In a nutshell here is what Tim Geithner's payday lending operation announced: "During the April – June 2010 quarter, Treasury expects to issue $340 billion in net marketable debt, assuming an end-of-June cash balance of $280 billion, which includes $200 billion for the Supplementary Financing Program (SFP). The borrowing estimate is $71 billion higher than announced in February 2010. The increase in borrowing is primarily related to cash balance adjustments associated with the recent restoration of the SFP to $200 billion. During the July – September 2010 quarter, Treasury expects to issue $376 billion in net marketable debt, assuming an end-of-September cash balance of $270 billion, which includes $200 billion for the SFP." In other words, the Treasury itself, which chronically underestimates its funding needs by about 20%, sees $716 billion in net funding needs in 6 months. Zero Hedge is prepared to make a market (and no we won't disclose to you that you are idiots if you sell protection on this bet either) on this number actually being north of $850 billion.

Some more details from the Payday Lenders:

During the January - March 2010 quarter, Treasury issued $483 billion in net marketable debt, and finished the quarter with a cash balance of $219 billion, of which $125 billion was attributable to the SFP. In February, Treasury estimated $392 billion in net marketable borrowing and assumed an end-of-March cash balance of $95 billion, which included an SFP balance of $5 billion. The increase in borrowing and the higher cash balance were due to a combination of the increase in the SFP balance, higher receipts, lower outlays, and higher State and Local Government Series net activity.

In April, the Treasury issued a net of $176 billion in total debt (includes Trust Funds and marketable debt), to end the month at $12,892,729,000,000. The final Bill redemption balance in April was a paltry $596 billion, or $675 including Bonds. Let us repeat: in April the US Treasury had to roll over two thirds of a trillion in debt. Assuming the treasury is correct, the Treasury balance will be $13.23 trillion on June 30, and $13.6 trillion on September 30.