Pompeo Offers $10 Million Reward For Information On Foreign Election Interference

In his latest speech excoriating China and the American tech industry for helping to enable untrustworthy Chinese companies by including their apps in various app stores, the Secretary of State warned Wednesday that the US was working to rein in Chinese cloud providers, while encouraging US tech firms to drop certain Chinese-run apps from their app stores.

Pompeo also revealed the state department would offer $10 million reward for the identity or location of "any person who acting at the direction of a foreign government interferes with US. elections by engaging in certain criminal cyber activities."

Asked about Alex Azar's upcoming trip to Taiwan, a move that has infuriated Beijing, Pompeo insisted there was some precedent for sending a US cabinet official to China.

"Cabinet members have traveled to Taiwan previously," Pompeo said. "This is consistent with policies of previous times. In 2000, then Pres. Bill Clinton's Transportation Sec. Rodney Slater visited Taiwan."

 

He urged the world to join together to confront the CCP's "coercive" behavior.

And also took a few shots at TikTok.

He also said the US would introduce a resolution next week before the UN Security Council to bar Iran from resuming its weapons program. He also said the US has "made progress" with Russia in moving toward a new arms control treaty, however, the US "hopes the Russians will urge China to participate".

Pompeo's speech comes hours after a State Department Inspector General looking into Pompeo abruptly decided to "return to the private sector", months after his predecessor was fired.

Akard's departure comes just as his office finalizes a report on Pompeo's controversial decision to bypass Congress to sell $8.1 billion in arms to Saudi Arabia and other Arab allies by using an emergency tied to Iran as an excuse to override concerns that the sales would worsen the situation in Yemen, where the Iran-backed Houthis have been fighting a lengthy proxy war against the central government, backed by Saudi Arabia and its allies.

President Trump fired Akard's predecessor, Steve Linick, back in May on Pompeo's advice. Linick was also reportedly looking into allegations that Pompeo abused his power asking employees from the state department to run his personal errands.