US Sent Reinforcements To Northern Baghdad During Withdrawal Report: Security Expert

Under the cover of mass confusion over Monday's alleged US withdrawal letter, which was then denied by the Pentagon, the US military stealthily resupplied the Taiji Camp north of Baghdad with troops and equipment, said Al-Masdar News, citing security expert, Hisham Al-Hashemi, who is also an advisor to the Iraqi government on terrorism. Hashemi said that while "everyone was busy discussing the message of the American forces to the Iraqi joint command about their' withdrawal," he was one of the few that pointed out this was merely fake news (actually, so were we, as the report came just moments after our article about the deployment of another 2,500 marines).

"During that period, several American convoys entered the Taiji camp, north of Baghdad, and cargo planes landed with additional equipment," he said.

The mass confusion started with the inexplicable publication of a draft letter from Marine Corps Brig. Gen. William H. Seely III, obtained by AFP, explaining how the US was rapidly pulling out of Iraq. The letter, which was never supposed to be sent out, detailed how "there will be an increase in helicopter travel in and around the International Zone (IZ) of Baghdad. This increased traffic will include CH47, VH-00, and AH-64 security escort helicopters." 

Hashemi said the Pentagon launched an informational war on Iraqis, giving them the perception that increased helicopter and convoy traffic was part of a withdraw mission from the region. But really, it was a deceptive tactic that allowed reinforcements to arrive at the Taiji camp. 

The confusion lasted several hours on Monday afternoon into evening, allowing the US military, at that time, to resupply the camp and prepare for an upcoming fight. 

Once the resupply mission was completed by Monday evening, US Defense Secretary Mark Esper denied the withdraw and said the letter was fake, but not before US forces on the ground received reinforcements which will last them for a long time.