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"Monetary Bathtub Overflowing" On Misguided Fed Policy, Warns Johns Hopkins Professor

Tyler Durden's Photo
by Tyler Durden
Wednesday, Mar 23, 2022 - 06:30 PM

Submitted By Daniela Cambone via Stansberry Research.

"They're flying blind, and are too little, too late," Steve Hanke says in disbelief, an Applied Economics professor of Johns Hopkins University. "It's utter rubbish and nonsense" that Fed Chairman Jerome Powell sees supply chain issues as a root cause for inflation, he tells me, as we decipher the Federal Reserve's latest official statements on the shape of the U.S. economy. 

"The money supply in excess causes inflation, and the Federal Reserve appears to be almost clueless," Hanke shares with me as we discuss last week's conversation between U.S. President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping. "Obviously the Chinese know this," which is why their inflation rating is less than 1%, the former Senior Economist on President Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers articulates to me. 

"China looks to benefit from all of the sanctions that have been thrown on Russia," he states as an opportunity for the United States adversary. "This is not a free lunch [for the U.S.]; if you impose sanctions, it is not a free lunch," he continues, which equates to severe repercussions for the current world reserve currency from his perspective. 

"The United States has weaponized the dollar-based financial system, we are in war mode," Hanke describes to me in suspicion of recent actions engaged by the U.S. government. He tells me that in the long-run, weaponizing the dollar jeopardizes and exposes vulnerabilities of its dominance, as seen with Saudi Arabia inching closer to accepting payments with the Chinese yuan. 

As foreign policy continues to raise questions about the dollar's outlook, Hanke describes actions taken domestically to deal with the current inflation crisis the Fed is dealing with as a, "monetary bathtub overflowing," seeping out into the U.S. economy. Due to the misguided approach the Fed is taking, Hanke reiterates that the largest piece of the puzzle not being observed is the money supply – where "you control the money supply by shrinking the balance sheet." 

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