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US Food Banks Warn Soaring Prices Will Affect Distributions 

Tyler Durden's Photo
by Tyler Durden
Saturday, Jun 26, 2021 - 08:15 PM

Soaring food prices aren't just impacting financially strapped families and the working poor. They're also affecting the mission of US food banks who are spending a lot more on food than ever before. 

"We're already spending a lot more on food than we have in years past," said Greg Trotter, a spokesman for the Greater Chicago Food Depository, a large food bank, who spoke with VOA News. "Our food purchasing budget has doubled this year."

In the coming weeks and or months, food banks across the country may experience a surge in food demand from millions of folks who are set to have their stimmy checks expire. At least 25 states are ending federal unemployment benefits. 

The perfect storm of factors (soaring food costs and unemployment benefits expiring) may stress food banks even further. 

"The high prices are costing us more to feed a family in need," said Alison Padget, development and outreach director at Food for Others. "We'll have to rethink our purchasing decisions because economists say the prices are going to be high for at least a year."

In Phoenix, Arizona, Jerry Brown, director of public relations at St. Mary's Food Bank, told VOA that food banks could face severe difficulty once federal money dries up. 

It seems the problem has already begun at the Community Food Bank of New Jersey, which covers a large portion of the state. Impact leader Triada Stampas said the food bank serves more people than ever because of out-of-control prices at grocery stores. 

According to Father English Food Pantry officials in Paterson, New Jersey, the food bank is already experiencing financial strain.  

Kelly Mott, external affairs director at the Mississippi Food Network, said, "We already see the price changes will affect us soon, adding that "we are in the process of buying turkeys for the Thanksgiving holiday in November. And since they are so expensive, we won't be able to purchase as many as we usually do, especially for the families with children who rely on us."    

And by the way, there are still 15 million Americans on some form of government dole...

The crisis is far from over as food bank stress begins to materialize, and not everyone might be fed this year. 

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