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WHO Says COVID Origins Will Be Found "Within A Few Years"

Tyler Durden's Photo
by Tyler Durden
Saturday, Mar 13, 2021 - 02:00 PM

In continuing the 12 month long stand up comedy act that the World Health Organization has been putting on (this is the organization who first told us there was no human to human Covid transmission, before then telling us we didn't need to use masks, before taking a year to investigate Covid's origins in China, all the while licking China's boots), the organization is now pushing back finding the origin of Covid for "a few years".

A member of an international team of investigators led by the World Health Organization said that, after focusing in on an animal source, we could know the origins "within the next few years," according to the Wall Street Journal. Peter Daszak, a member of the WHO-led team, said: “I’m convinced we’re going to find out fairly soon. Within the next few years we’ll have real significant data on where this came from and how it emerged.”

Sigh.

Daszak was one of three team members who spoke on a webinar about his recent trip to Wuhan. Daszak said he learned that "meat from animals known to carry coronaviruses belonging to the same family as the pandemic virus were sold in the Huanan market".

We also wonder if he happened to see this building off in the distance at any point during his "investigation":

Regardless, the WHO team has "expressed frustration" with the lack of information China is giving them - as WSJ notes - "particularly regarding early Covid-19 cases that could help determine whether the virus was circulating before the first cases were confirmed."

Sigh.

The team is expected to release a report next week that will talk about its findings and offer up recommendations for an investigation for further study. Daszak said the team's "leading hypothesis" is that a "a bat or other wildlife species carrying a progenitor, or closely related virus, infected a farm animal or a person, who then carried it to the Huanan market."

“I believe that’s the most likely scenario, and I think most people on both sides of the mission felt the same way,” he commented.

Dutch virologist Marion Koopmans said it was "extremely unlikely" that the virus escaped from a lab. And while committing to investigate any such links, she also said scientists were put on restriction during their visit to Wuhan: “The second phase of our trip after the hotel quarantine, we still could not freely go about. That was a disappointment for all of us.”

Daszak concluded: “There was a conduit from Wuhan to the provinces in South China, where the closest relative viruses to SARS-CoV-2 are found in bats. That’s a really important clue."

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