Employers Show "Strong Distaste" For The 3 Million Long-Term Unemployed

There are still more than 3 million Americans who have been unemployed for more than 52 weeks and, as WSJ reports, economists (via recent studies) worry they will never work again. Of course, with benefits at such heights (and work punished), it is not surprising but on the demand side, for the long-term unemployed, interview "callback rates decrease dramatically at 9 months of unemployment." Worst still, for those applying for medium-to-low skilled jobs (so the majority), being long-term unemployed reduced interview requests by 20% - the equivalent of shaving four years of work experience off their resumes. Critically, one study found employers showed "a strong distaste for applicants with long spells of non-employment."

Sad...

 

But remember this:

 

Via WSJ,

Do the long-term unemployed face a stigma that keeps them from finding jobs? A new experiment suggests the answer is “yes”

 

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More than three million Americans have been out of work for more than a year, a figure that leaves out millions of others who have given up looking for work because they can’t find jobs. Economists worry many of them will never work again.

 

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In a forthcoming paper in the American Economic Review, the researchers find that short-term spells of unemployment (those of six months or less) had no effect on job-seekers’ prospects.... But for the long-term unemployed, it was a different story: “The callback rate decreases dramatically at nine months of unemployment,” the researchers write. For those applying for medium or low-skill jobs (those not requiring a college degree), being long-term unemployed reduced interview requests by 20%, the equivalent of shaving four years of work experience off their resumes.

 

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The good news for the long-term unemployed: If they can find work, the stigma of their joblessness should wash away fairly quickly.

 

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Northeastern University graduate student Rand Ghayad conducted a similar experiment in the U.S. last year. His research, which hasn’t yet been published, found that employers showed “a strong distaste for applicants with long spells of non-employment” — even when they had better experience than applicants who had been unemployed for less time.