For CNBC, 2014 Was The Worst. Year. Ever.

Another year of putting lipstick on the zombie known as the global economy, kept walking only thanks to $11 trillion in liquidity injections by the world's central banks and tens of trillions of new Chinese credit created out of thin air and promptly misallocated and embezzled, and the results are in. The bottom line: according to Nielsen, is that despite the S&P recording a whopping 53 all time highs, and the Dow rising over 18,000, the channel that was once must watch financial TV for mom and pop, and has since devolved into endless cheerleading of failed policies and rigged markets, namely CNBC, just suffered its worst year in, well, ever.

But don't worry: the "retail investor" who has now fully given up on the "market", will surely be back this year, and with it CNBC's ratings.

In the meantime, here are the facts:

  • CNBC's Total Business Day segment (M-F 9:30a-5p), just delivered its lowest rated year since 1995 with P2+ and delivered its lowest rated year ever since 1992 with the 25-54 demographic

Program Highlights 2014

  • Squawk Box delivered its lowest rated year ever with both total viewers and the 25-54 demo
  • Squawk on the Street delivered its lowest rated year ever with both total viewers and the 25-54 demo
  • Fast Money/Halftime Report delivered its lowest rated year ever with both total viewers and the 25-54 demo
  • Power Lunch delivered its lowest rated year ever with both total viewers and the 25-54 demo
  • Street Signs delivered its lowest rated year ever with both total viewers and the 25-54 demo
  • Closing Bell (3p-5p) delivered  its lowest rated year ever with both total viewers and the 25-54 demo
  • Fast Money delivered its lowest rated year ever with total viewers and its 2nd lowest rated year ever with the 25-54 demo (lowest rated year ever is 2013)
  • Mad Money delivered its 2nd lowest rated year ever with total viewers (lowest rated year is 2013) and its lowest rated year ever with the 25-54 demo

Finally, one wonders if without the Fed and other central banks, the real S&P500 wouldn't look like the chart of CNBC's Nielsen ratings...

How ironic, then, that another market crash is precisely what CNBC needs to regain its audience before it slides into complete oblivion (by both viewers and advertisers).

Source: Nielsen

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