Ohio State Offers Class On How To Detect Microaggressions And Be "Self-Aware Of White Privilege"

This spring, Ohio State University will launch a new course entitled "Crossing Identity Boundaries" which will empower America's precious snowflakes with all of the tools they need to detect microaggressions and become "self-aware" of their inherent "white privilege."  Unfortunately, this isn't a joke.

According to the class homepage, at the end of the course, students should be able to "identify micro-aggressions within their daily lives and within society as a whole" and "identify ways in which they can challenge or address systems of power and privilege."

Moreover, although it seems a little off topic for this particular course, students will also apparently be taught whether or not it's appropriate for guys to always pay on a date.  And even though it's not explicitly addressed on the course syllabus, we presume it's a given that such a question would only be asked after determining one's preferred pronoun because otherwise we're just not sure how young people would go about confirming they're actually on a date with a "guy."  It's also very unclear whether the mere discussion of stereotypical gender roles, like who should pay for a date, might be a "micro-aggression" in and of itself...dicey territory for sure.



For those of you who may want to do some personal, private study, here is a list of a couple of books/articles from the course's required reading list:

  • Waking up White: What it means to accept your legacy, for better and worse
  • White privilege: unpacking the invisible knapsack
  • Here’s the perfect explanation for why White people need to stop saying #AllLivesMatter
  • 3 examples of everyday cissexism
  • The science behind why people fear refugees
  • Creating identity-safe spaces on college campuses for Muslim students
  • Christian privilege: Breaking a sacred taboo

Meanwhile, per College Fix, homework assignments include, among other things, taking two "implicit bias tests" and finding at least 12 example of micro-aggressions on social media.

Taking the course, offered through the Department of Educational Studies, is one way students can fulfill the university’s mandatory diversity requirement, and many sections are offered throughout the school year.


Part of the homework includes taking two “implicit bias tests,” and writing journals on prompts such as “power/privilege in your life” or calling on Christians to write about what it might feel like to be Muslim, or males on what it’s like to be female, and “reflecting on how this new identity would have impacted your day.”


One big part of the class is a microaggressions group presentation and reflective paper.


The assignment, according to a syllabus, calls on students to “find at least 12 examples of microaggressions using at least 3 different types of social media (e.g., Yik Yak, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest). Explain who the target of the microaggression is and why your group believes it is an example of a negative remark. Provide an example of how you might respond to such a comment.”


The assignment’s goal is for students to “evaluate the impact that power and privilege have within social media,” a syllabus states. Students are graded on the “quality of microaggresion chosen (do they clearly articulate why they are microaggressions and which group is targeted” and “quality of response (did they address the microaggression in an appropriate and meaningful way?)”

Amazingly, American parents can get all of this for the bargain basement price of just $44,784 per year.  Just an amazing value.


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