Hillary Not "Out Of The Woods": Arkansas Bar Considers Disciplinary Action Over Email Scandal

It was just about a year ago that James Comey boldly consolidated the roles of investigator, lawyer, judge and jury when he announced that, although Hillary was "extremely careless" in her mishandling of classified State Department emails, no reasonable prosecutor would be willing to bring charges against her. 

And even though she got a free pass from the former FBI Director, Hillary may not be "out of the woods" just yet.  As The Washington Times points out, a New York attorney has filed a "misconduct complaint" against Clinton with the Arkansas bar accusing her of "dishonest behavior" and "lying under oath"...allegations that could result in disciplinary actions by the middle of next month.

But the issue continues to dog her, not only at the State Department, but as a lawyer.

 

Ty Clevenger, a New York lawyer, filed an attorney misconduct complaint last year against Mrs. Clinton in Arkansas, accusing her of dishonest behavior and lying under oath in testimony to Congress.

 

In an email Wednesday, Michael E. Harmon, deputy director of the state bar’s office of professional conduct, told Mr. Clevenger he’s still working on the matter. “It is my hope to have something to you by the middle of July at the latest,” he wrote.

Clevenger has also asked for discipline in other venues against Clinton’s lawyers during the email fiasco: David Kendall, Cheryl Mills and Heather Samuelson.

Hillary

 

Of course, this follows news from just a couple of days ago that the State Department has also opened a formal inquiry into Hillary Clinton’s alleged mishandling of classified information on her private email server. Clinton, who has repeatedly blamed the FBI’s handling of the inquiry for her embarrassing defeat in November, is now facing the possibility of having her top-level security clearance revoked – a penalty that echoes the investigation of former National Security Adviser Mike Flynn.

Here’s Fox:

The department’s investigation aims to determine whether Clinton and her closest aides violated government protocols by using her private server to receive, hold and transmit classified and top-secret government documents. The department declined to say when its inquiry began, but it follows the conclusion of the FBI’s probe into the matter, which did not result in any actions being taken against Clinton or any of her aides.

 

Depending on the outcome of the current State Department inquiry, Clinton and her aides could have their access to sensitive government documents terminated.
Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, confirmed to Fox News the department’s formal inquiry.

 

Meanwhile, Grassley’s committee launched its own inquiry into Clinton’s handling of emails, an inquiry that began in March. Grassley cited among his concerns the July 5 statement of former FBI Director James Comey that the agency found Clinton and her staff members were “extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.”

So, perhaps it makes some sense to 'stay in the woods' for a while longer?