Don't Be Fooled - The Federal Reserve Will Continue Rate Hikes Despite Crisis

Authored by Brandon Smith via Alt-Market.com,

Though stock markets in general are meaningless and indicate nothing in terms of the health of the economy they still function as a form of hypnosis, or a kind of Pavlovian mechanism; a tool that central bankers can use to keep a population servile and salivating at the ring of a bell. As I have mentioned in the past, the only two elements of the economy that the average person pays attention to in the slightest are the unemployment rate and the Dow. As long as the first is down and the second is up, they aren't going to take a second look at the health of our financial system.

Historians and economists often wonder after the fact how it was possible for so many "experts" and others to miss the flashing red lights leading into market implosions like that which occurred in 2008. Well, this is exactly how; within any casino there is an inherent bias towards false hope. Meaning, many people will invariably ignore all negative factors and past experience because positivism is more pleasant. Central bankers are keen to take advantage of this condition.

When observing from the outside-in, this attitude rings of desperation. Investors, with no positive fundamental data to turn to in the economy, have now been relegated to scouring press releases and speeches for ANY indication that the central bank might not take the punch bowl away as they have been doing slowly over the past few years. In fact, in most cases negative data has actually triggered spikes in equities because the assumption on the part of investors is that bad data will cause the Fed to second-guess its stimulus reduction policies. In this way, central bankers can, at least for now, fake-out investors with a simple word or phrase released in a strategic manner.

An example of this occurred last week as Fed Chair Janet Yellen threw investors and aglo-trading computers a bone with an admission (finally) that inflation (as the Fed measures it) may not be as strong as the Fed had hoped. Investors cheered. Their assumption now is that the Fed will not continue with its steady interest rate increases. But, if one examines the central bank's past behavior this is a foolish assumption.

The Fed will indeed continue its interest rate hikes unabated, and here's why...

The tone set by the central bank on interest rates has been overwhelmingly "hawkish" over the past six months. Minutes from the Fed's June meeting mention a concern over stocks being "too high," and the potential for "market risks." Fed officials also cite concerns that markets have been ignoring rate hikes with blind exuberance. The Fed has continued rate hikes through 2017 despite a constant barrage of negative data, causing confusion in the financial world.

I covered elements of this deluge of bad data in my article 'Peak Economic Delusion Signals Coming Crisis'.

First, it is important to understand that everything the Fed does and says publicly is highly calculated. When there is confusion surrounding Fed rhetoric, it is often strategic, not random. Yellen's admission to the U.S. House Financial Services Committee that low inflation is a concern conflicts with numerous Fed statements made previously.

For example, last month Yellen surprised analysts with her claim that she "expects no new crisis in our lifetimes." This is an extremely confident and hawkish sentiment on top of numerous other arguments in favor of interest rate hikes regardless of low inflation. Only weeks later, inflation is suddenly a concern?

Investors immediately interpreted Yellen's mention of low inflation to mean that the Fed was backing away from its hard stance on rate hikes, as well as its pursuit of reductions in its balance sheet. What they completely ignored was the fact that Yellen also reiterated to the same Financial Services Committee the Fed's intention to CONTINUE rate increases at the current pace.

The Fed has used this method of mixed messages before. During the lead up to the taper of quantitative easing, central bankers sent mixed messages to the investment world leading everyone to believe that the taper was a no-go. Investors, of course, celebrated, while many alternative analysts were patting themselves on the back for their prediction that the Fed would "never" taper QE.

In the midst of rising potential for interest rate increases, the Fed pulled a fast one on analysts once again. Citing growth concerns, Yellen bamboozled mainstream economists and alternative economists alike, sowing the seeds of assumption that rate hikes were going to fall by the wayside.

In every case, the Fed insinuated it had "doubts", while at the same time stating that the removal of stimulus will march onward. This time will be no different. Interest rates are going up up up, and the only question is, how long will it take before market investors accept this as reality and equities crash in response?

I believe that Yellen's latest pronouncement of "no new crisis within our lifetimes" is a signal that this reversal in the stock bubble will take place very soon. I am reminded immediately of these quotes from prominent names in the economic world just prior to the crash of 1929:

John Maynard Keynes in 1927: "We will not have any more crashes in our time."

 

H.H. Simmons, president of the New York Stock Exchange, Jan. 12, 1928: "I cannot help but raise a dissenting voice to statements that we are living in a fool’s paradise, and that prosperity in this country must necessarily diminish and recede in the near future."

 

Irving Fisher, leading U.S. economist, The New York Times, Sept. 5, 1929: "There may be a recession in stock prices, but not anything in the nature of a crash." And on Sept. 17, 1929: "Stock prices have reached what looks like a permanently high plateau. I do not feel there will be soon if ever a 50 or 60 point break from present levels, such as (bears) have predicted. I expect to see the stock market a good deal higher within a few months."

 

McNeel, market analyst, as quoted in the New York Herald Tribune, Oct. 30, 1929: "This is the time to buy stocks. This is the time to recall the words of the late J. P. Morgan... that any man who is bearish on America will go broke. Within a few days there is likely to be a bear panic rather than a bull panic. Many of the low prices as a result of this hysterical selling are not likely to be reached again in many years."

 

Harvard Economic Society, Nov. 10, 1929: "... a serious depression seems improbable; [we expect] recovery of business next spring, with further improvement in the fall."

Yellen seems to be echoing the bewildering rhetoric of past economic catastrophe; offering prophecies which she knows are false while purposely increasing instability through interest rate hikes. As I have noted many times, this is the classic modus operandi of the Fed. The Fed raises rates into economic decline and ignores all evidence that they are bursting a bubble they engineered — this is what they do.

During recessionary conditions in 1927, the Fed increased the money supply exponentially through open market purchases and a reduced discount rate, which many economists argue was a primary catalyst for the artificial liquidity that created the stock market bubble of 1929. Once the crash occurred and the depression set in, the Fed RAISED RATES and made matters worse (as openly admitted by Ben Bernanke decades later in 2002). The Fed thus prolonged the depression for years beyond the normal deflationary cycle.

Using history as our guide, central bankers like to conjure an environment of fiscal dangers, then they warn of those danger too little too late, and then claim ignorance of their own activities after the crash.

This is nothing new in our era. Former Fed chairman Alan Greenspan publicly admitted in an interview that the central bank knew an irrational bubble had formed, but claims they assumed the negative factors would "wash out."

Once they are ready to allow their planned implosion to occur, the central bankers are more than happy to throw investors to the wolves. That is to say, the investment world's optimism is only useful to the Fed for a time. If rhetoric and behaviors previous to the crash of 1929 are any measure, today we are only meager months away from a similar event. For further explanation, I outline in detail the reasons why the globalists would instigate a fiscal crisis in my article 'The Federal Reserve Is A Saboteur — And The "Experts" Are Oblivious.'

I suspect that the central banks and the globalists that control them are hoping to bide their time in terms a complete equities crash in preparation for a geopolitical event — a distraction massive enough to draw attention away from the bankers and their culpability for any economic disaster. They certainly will not allow stocks to crash in a vacuum.

In conclusion, I would like to leave readers with a quote from Great Depression era Federal Reserve chairman Roy Young. Perhaps investors should consider that they are being duped by central bank ploys, and that they are useful idiots in a game designed to keep the public under control with fraudulent markets until the Fed is ready to pull the plug. When the crash takes place, the Fed will find a way to remove itself from any blame. In the meantime, make no mistake, the interest rate hikes will continue into next year and the Fed's balance sheet will be reduced.

Addressing the Indiana Bankers Association, before the Stock Market Crash of 1929, Fed Chairman Roy Young had this to say:

"Many people in America seem to be more concerned about the present situation than the Federal Reserve System is. If unsound credit practices have developed, these practices will in time correct themselves, and if some of the overindulgent get 'burnt' during the period of correction, they will have to shoulder the blame themselves and not attempt to shift it to someone else."

Comments

philipat runningman18 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 03:03 Permalink

I beg to differ. Brainard's speech to an academic audience was much more revealing and indicated that the Fed THINKS it can get away with reducing its balance Sheet whilst remaining steady on rates for now and I think that is what they will do for several reasons. First, the Fed believes the two approaches are equal in effect and, Second because the Fed would like to get rid of some of the toxic mortgage debt which, as a result of all the bubbles they have pumped everywhere, actaally has a positive value in the "market" at present.I agree that whatever happens, the Fed will blame Trump for any crash or recession and, actually, he only has himself to blame. By taking ownership of the economy when a few "good" numbers came out he is no longer able to state what he said during the election that the economy sucks and that Obozo doubled the debt to unsustainable levels.

In reply to by runningman18

runningman18 philipat Thu, 07/20/2017 - 03:40 Permalink

No, they will hike rates as per their admissions during Yellen's committee hearing, and they'll reduce the balance sheet at the same time. Like the author, I've heard all this garbage before about "pausing" and "stepping back", with the taper and interest rates etc.  It was all distraction and people here bought into it back then just like a lot of them are buying into it now.  The banksters are pulling the plug, otherwise they never would have started the interest rate increases in the first place. 

In reply to by philipat

DavidC philipat Thu, 07/20/2017 - 06:03 Permalink

Nomi Prins said last year that when she was speaking at the Fed, the people there didn't understand why their actions hadn't been or weren't affecting the underlying economy in the way that they expected. In other words, they don't really know what they're doing.

Is the Fed really that evil that it would willingly throw investors and the economy to the wolves? I really don't know, but if it is it should not be allowed to survive.

DavidC

In reply to by philipat

GreatUncle Doom and Dust Thu, 07/20/2017 - 07:18 Permalink

Well here is the FED's choice war or a worthless FIAT and with it all the power that goes with having more worth than the slaves.THE ELITE HAVE CHOSEN, THEY PREFER WAR OR WATCH THEMSELVES BECOME PENNILESS.2008 they got caught wrong footed so they gave themselves a decade to move all there financial interests into safer places.NOW THEY CAN PULL THE ECONOMIC PLUG KNOWING THEIR WORTH AND POWER IS SECURE.

In reply to by Doom and Dust

GooseShtepping Moron Thu, 07/20/2017 - 01:47 Permalink

I agree with almost all of this. The Fed will definitely raise rates and there will be a stock market crash, probably by the fourth quarter of this year. I only have one minor quibble. Not only will the Fed not take the blame for the crash, the Fed in reality isn't to blame for the crash. The problems are structural and fundamental, not monetary. The idea that the Fed and the globalists are purposefully engineering some kind of geopolitical event to deflect attention from their monetary shenanigans presumes too much control on their part.

runningman18 GooseShtepping Moron Thu, 07/20/2017 - 01:55 Permalink

Banksters like Greenspan and Bernanke admit openly they cause crashes and then pretend it was all a "mistake".  They do it deliberately and then laugh in our faces because we can't comprehend that kind of evil or power monopoly could be real.  We make excuses even though the evidence is right in front of us.  They've been doing this for a long time.  Order out of chaos... 

In reply to by GooseShtepping Moron

coast1 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 02:02 Permalink

and it rains in the northwest during winter, and I think it snows in alaska.  Not sure but it seems that the sun comes up in the morning too...not sure, but I think the snowflakes will be in there dresses protesting about nothing...So hey, I learned more about this eclipse thing...I thought it was worldwide but its friggin in a corridor...right theu my city...they expect a million visitors, and all kinds of warnings etc...crazy shit...I dont mean to be sarcstic, but what if its cloudy on august 21? lol

fockewulf190 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 02:10 Permalink

What Yellen really ment: "No crashes can be allowed to happen ever again...in anybody's lifetime".

The evidence that this is the newly agreed upon strategy amongst most of the central banks is clearer than ever. A crash means TEOTWAWKI under current economic conditions. We have come this far. So confidence must be maintained in the current system at all costs. Bad news? Pre-authorize the PPT, or the Swiss, or Mario, or the Japanese, to act. Get 'em to buy stocks. Or sell oil. Or support x currency against y. Or buy debt. Have them coordinate between each other. Give them the vital financial data stats before the public. It's a strategy that has been executed before, but executed in a piecemeal fashion. The resulting support was usually reactive in nature. Not anymore. Now it's preemptive. No need anymore to trample out the Fed talking heads and constantly talk the algos into the direction they should be going. The overloads manipulating the show have gotten "smarter".

Whatever needs to be done, will be done. We are seeing evidence of this every trading day. Observers are perplexed. Minds are baffled. For the professional traders out there, it's a nightmare. Prior thinking....logic...out the window. It's effecting the profits of the big boys now. Their concerns, however, are secondary.

Confidence also means supporting the major fiat currencies of the world...and crushing sentiment and development of alternatives. Gold and silver are so blatantly manipulated in the paper markets, it isn't even attempted to be hidden anymore. On the contrary, that is the purpose (too bad for the individual PM traders and banks who are now being sacrificed "for the sake of the system"). The results have been effective. Sentiment is bad. Retail sales of phyzz have cliff dived.

Now, the next threat has emerged. The cryptos. It's been previously a small blip on the central banks radar. Not anymore. They have been observing...learning quickly how the system works. Finding out where the weaknesses are. There is legitimate interest from the Central banks in crypto currency. The advantages are "the final solution" (pardon the morbid pun) over paper fiat. There is no doubt they will attempt to control that market, and they have access to unlimited funds, supercomputer technology, and old generation politicians with legislative powers. Will they succeed? Is "Ripple" the current Trojan horse of the cryptos, sitting there, currently worth chump change, just waiting to fulfill its purpose? Perhaps. It is also no surprise that other cryptos are now under sudden attack from hackers. Sentiment destruction? Where have we seen this before?

So, this is the situation we are dealing with. Yelling is confident it's going to work...despite the ever increasing world debt levels month after month. President Trump has laid political claim to the successful stock market. Crazy, right? But he's a club member like Janet. Isn't he.

GreatUncle fockewulf190 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 07:27 Permalink

And with no crash all the malinvestment rehypothecates itself into more malinvestment.Fastest way to render monetary value worthless is no crash, just go look at Japan.So that cannot be allowed so crash it will be and not time like the present.In reality the FED could just slam dunk +5% on rates but then it is to obvious.So the slow incremental rates to achieve the crash is so you do not hang them as your life or world implodes.Final reality for the FED what good is having money (the crash) if the population is in revolution (no power).The FED wants both money and power.For the population not being in control of the money supply you might want to considerA bigger revolutionary effect to block the FED.

In reply to by fockewulf190

coast1 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 02:11 Permalink

I am such an idiot...I thought things were going to collapse in 2008....it did collapse but how was i to know they would start printing trillions...dunno...now, I am in the same boat waiting for this shit...maybe its time to just turn off my computer, grow some food,  keep powder dry, fuck all the women I can, drink beer and smoke buds and play music...yep, thats what I am gonna do...got my acres, water, herrloom seeds, my guitar my rifles, and my cialis...I am good...

BetterRalph coast1 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 06:39 Permalink

I used to think like an idiot too. then I had a heart attack. After a Stent and DAPT drugs, I got mad and reversed the situation.

That beer has wheat, and wheat wrecks hell on your gut which has a blood brain barrier connection with brain blood flow and your well being. Stomach is bein called a Second Brain. I would skip the cialis chemical, and eat a carrot beet and apple every day, then I predict the long lost dong will find Morningwood. Skip the fast carbs and sugar and soon your BMI will be green, your breath return, and your inflammation reduced. Education is the way out of idiocy. Willpower is made powerful by taking action. The action is not to put BAD stuff in your mouth so you don't end up dead.

Here we are in 2017 and I am stacking gold silver for my third year. What dapt drugs. What angina.

In reply to by coast1

SHRAGS Thu, 07/20/2017 - 02:57 Permalink

This one hit my inbox last week from Ben Hunt: Gradually and Then Suddenly http://www.epsilontheory.com/notes/gradually-and-then-suddenly/...The answer, of course, is the answer that the Fed will never admit. The reason companies aren’t investing more aggressively in plant and equipment and technology is BECAUSE we have the most accommodative monetary policy in the history of the world, with the easiest money to borrow that corporations have ever seen. Why in the world would management take the risk — and it’s definitely a risk — of investing for real growth when they are so awash in easy money that they can beat their earnings guidance with a risk-free stock buyback? Why in the world would management take the risk — and it’s definitely a risk — of investing for GAAP earnings when they are so awash in easy money that they can hit their pro forma narrative guidance by simply buying profitless revenue? Why in the world would companies take any risk at all when the Fed has eliminated any and all negative consequences for playing it safe? It’s like going to a college where grade inflation makes an A- the average grade. Sure, I could bust a gut to get that A, but why would I do that?How does this apply to wage inflation? It’s the same thing. Why in the world would a company pay up to fill a position when it’s a risk they really don’t need to take? Yeah, we’ve got job openings, and yeah, our skill positions are increasingly going unfilled, and yeah, we’d like to expand and grow … I suppose. But, hey, we’re hitting our numbers just fine as it stands and, if you hadn’t noticed, our stock price hit a new high yesterday. Why mess up a good thing?How does this change? As the Fed slowly raises rates, as the barge slowly chugs down the tightening river, it will force companies to play it less safe. It will force companies to take on more risk. It will force companies to invest more in plant and equipment and technology. It will force companies to pay up for the skilled workers they need. You want wage inflation? You want productivity growth? Then raise rates!And god forbid if we actually get a tax reform bill passed. That’s the off-to-the-races moment.My point is a simple one. In exactly the same way that QE was deflationary in practice when it was inflationary in theory, so will the end of QE be inflationary in practice when it is deflationary in theory. That’s the real world impact I’m talking about, the world of wages and output and productivity. You know, the real world that used to be the touchstone of our markets.And here’s my other point. In the Bizarro-world that central bankers have created over the past eight years, raising rates isn’t going to have the same inflation-dampening effect that it’s had in past tightening cycles, at least not until you get to much higher rates than you have today. It’s going to accelerate inflation by forcing risk-taking in the real world, which means that the barge is going to have to move faster and faster the more it moves at all. I think that today’s head-scratcher for the world’s central banks — why haven’t our easy money policies created inflation in the real world? — will soon be replaced by a new head-scratcher — why haven’t our tighter money policies tamed inflation in the real world?My view: as the tide of QE goes out, the tide of inflation comes in. And the more that the QE tide recedes, the more inflation comes in. I know that this sounds like a nutty scenario today, with everyone talking about how inflation is dead and gone, and how the Fed will be “fighting” inflation by raising rates, but I gotta call ‘em like I see ‘em. It’s a scenario that neither central banks nor markets have contemplated in any serious way, but it’s going to be a focus for Epsilon Theory.

pizdowitz Thu, 07/20/2017 - 03:17 Permalink

Higher rates? NEVER.More money. ALWAYS.Read some of Bernanke papers and speeches. The guy is the Messiah of modern central banking.Even today some have difficulty fathoming that simple truth.    

alphasammae Thu, 07/20/2017 - 03:52 Permalink

The FED and Bank system is predatory, pump, confusion, and doubt and at the end of the cycle clean up through failures, defaults, and bankruptcies. Roll off the sleeves and reset. Pump again. One reason why Asia which operates differently will continue to progress through the success of its clients, not the failure. 

Batman11 Batman11 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 04:50 Permalink

The debt-to-GDP ratio monitors unproductive lending into the economy; it is used by the BIS and Steve Keen.Steve Keen saw 2008 coming in 2005 by looking here:https://cdn.opendemocracy.net/neweconomics/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2017/04/Screen-Shot-2017-04-21-at-13.52.41.pngIt wasn’t hard, 1929 and 2008 stick out like sore thumbs when you look in the right place. Let's sit back and watch China,  Hong Kong, Norway, Sweden, Belgium, Australia, Canada and South Korea blow upThey are debt soaked time bombs highlighted by Steve Keen.The BIS will warn us closer to the time, they are usually fairly slow. 

In reply to by Batman11

moorewasthebestbond (not verified) Thu, 07/20/2017 - 06:19 Permalink

One Brandon Smith article is worth at least two Michael Snyder or Mac Slavo doom porn articles in the bush.

The Real Tony Thu, 07/20/2017 - 06:43 Permalink

All you get is a headfake every now and then that is a token rate hike to try substantiate their blatant lying about the economy getting better when in fact is always gets worse each year.

gdpetti Thu, 07/20/2017 - 07:29 Permalink

Pulling the rug out simply means resetting the game... out with the old [OWO], and in with the new. [NWO].There are cycles to civilization.. many have written about this, like Spengler... the ancient cycles or ages of 'gold/silver/copper/iron'.We are at the end of that last and final age of iron.... reset approaches... 'something wicked this way comes'.Mother Nature cleaning house.... otherwise known as the cataclysm, ice age, main comet cluster and all associated EM turbulence.The end allows cleanup, reset and after a couple eons, a restart.... only with a change of 'shirts' this time.The Fed, like all central banks, has to follow orders.... from those in the SG, further up the chain of command. Yellen and the rest will do as they are told. That is why they are in their positions to begin with. Trump can be allowed as a character of chaos to help disrupt the establishment.... success is global chaos. You know what follows. Collapsing the system before Mother Nature does it all herself. Why? Because the PTB feed off of negative energy like fear.... and for 'graduation', they need, LOTS and LOTS of FEAR... ANGER, LUST, et al.

Davidduke2000 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 07:46 Permalink

The central bank has no choice, orders come from large investors, "we want more money" the decision is not old yeller to do, it's the money cartel that can bankrupt the us and any country

Glyndwr will return Thu, 07/20/2017 - 08:01 Permalink

I want a red Ferrari and a Russian brunette. What I actually get will probably be entirely different.The Fed wants to raise rates and might want the subsequent crash - in which case no problemBut the Fed might want to raise rates and no crash - in which case we are in Ferrariland

djsmps Thu, 07/20/2017 - 08:13 Permalink

ZH has finally embraced fake news. They post this shortly after posting another article that said:Last week the Fed raised the white flag on further rate hikes. There won’t be any for the foreseeable future.

Iconoclast421 Thu, 07/20/2017 - 08:18 Permalink

The Fed could hike a full percentage point every quarter and it wouldnt stop all this funny money from goosing the markets. It would take about 6% rates before it began to have an adverse effect.

kwaremont Thu, 07/20/2017 - 08:45 Permalink

well, you know, we are living in the keynesian world based on the religious prophecy that "in the long run we are all dead" (=be irresponsible interventionist, dear politicians, print and buy voter sheeps, these megadebts do not matter)the only problem is that any sane person, especially with kids, know that we are NOT DEAD in what concerns the debts, we live through OUR CHILDREN who will have to pay them (either in kind, or by war or another catastrophe)only the high priests of gaynomics (like Keynes) who do not have this natural instincts can come up with such a stupidity - which is obviously so tempting for the ruling politico-oligarchical criminals and their clowns called "economists", "central bankers",  "ministers", etc.sheeple are bamboozled by socialist religion (exactly the same way the rulers used catholibanism during dark age) so they do not protest too much, and here we go... and the productive majority somehow became minority, to that the status quo of the power of establishment can even be "democratically" decidedend of civilization for any practical purposes, middle-age minds of the third world  will re-live the history... because the societies that cannot learn from the history will have to suffer it againand this obviously include China, that has millenia long history of huge progress, gathering clever minds under centralized system - and after some time all this gets totally destroyed, usually by their own stupid leaders... since the first dynasties

kwaremont Thu, 07/20/2017 - 08:45 Permalink

well, you know, we are living in the keynesian world based on the religious prophecy that "in the long run we are all dead" (=be irresponsible interventionist, dear politicians, print and buy voter sheeps, these megadebts do not matter)the only problem is that any sane person, especially with kids, know that we are NOT DEAD in what concerns the debts, we live through OUR CHILDREN who will have to pay them (either in kind, or by war or another catastrophe)only the high priests of gaynomics (like Keynes) who do not have this natural instincts can come up with such a stupidity - which is obviously so tempting for the ruling politico-oligarchical criminals and their clowns called "economists", "central bankers",  "ministers", etc.sheeple are bamboozled by socialist religion (exactly the same way the rulers used catholibanism during dark age) so they do not protest too much, and here we go... and the productive majority somehow became minority, to that the status quo of the power of establishment can even be "democratically" decidedend of civilization for any practical purposes, middle-age minds of the third world  will re-live the history... because the societies that cannot learn from the history will have to suffer it againand this obviously include China, that has millenia long history of huge progress, gathering clever minds under centralized system - and after some time all this gets totally destroyed, usually by their own stupid leaders... since the first dynasties

Youri Carma Thu, 07/20/2017 - 08:51 Permalink

??? The Fed Has Hit The 'Pause' Button by Jim Rickardshttp://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-07-19/fed-has-hit-pause-buttonSo who will be right Brandon Smith or Jim Rickards? My bet is on Jim.Gregory Mannarino is saying that the FED is hot on reaching their inflation target by killing the dollar and that's exactly what we see happening.Gold, Silver, Cryptos, Crude, Stocks, All Rebound On Weak DollarJul 19, 2017 Gregory Mannarinohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys_Yf7aSSmw

JailBanksters Thu, 07/20/2017 - 09:16 Permalink

If the Feral Reserve increased the rate 1 10,000 th of a Percent each month since 2008the rate would higher than it is today. They didn't because the economy is F'ed, and couldn't take such a massive increase.Because of that, The Days of Bankers paying to create money out of thin air are long gone. The worlds F'ed, it's gettings worse and it's your fault !!    

DelusionsCrowded Thu, 07/20/2017 - 09:56 Permalink

One of your best articles Bradon . One thing you don't examine is the China question .
I find it interesting that India is picking a fight with China on a boarder issue .

The big difficulty for the SG is losing the ko to China if the west drops the financial ball . If China doesn't fall , then the ball immediately is taken by them . Game over .
This is why a WW is so important for the Globalists . They need to bring the whole system down so THEY can rebuild it in their own image .

barysenter Thu, 07/20/2017 - 11:07 Permalink

Slavery is an economic condition my ancestors broke out of. They brought your ancestors along because of your value as part of a fighting force against a well heeled enemy.Nothing has changed. Treason is the biggest peril we face. Pull your weight or gtfo.