Mexico Police Find Enough Fentanyl To Kill Millions En Route To US Border

The Mexican National Security Commission reports that federal police discovered a multi-drug international shipment that included 914 pounds of crystal meth, 100 pounds of fentanyl, 88 pounds of cocaine, and 18 pounds of heroin, in a vehicle headed to the California border.

 

According to the Oxford Treatment Center,

The lethal dose for fentanyl is generally stated to be 2 milligrams. Again, this lethal dose considers that the individual has not developed significant tolerance; however, even in individuals with significant tolerance, the lethal dose of fentanyl is extremely small compared to the potential lethal doses of many other opiate drugs.

That means the 100 pounds of fentanyl (45.5 kilograms) is enough to kill millions of Americans.

Federal police regularly conduct security and surveillance tasks along the highway that connects Ensenada with the town of Lazaro Cardenas. Ensenada is a coastal city in Mexico, the third largest in Baja California and located about 77 miles south of San Diego. Federal police closely monitor the highways in Baja, because the network of roads in the area are some of the top preferred methods of hauling drugs into the United States via drug cartels.

 

On Thursday, federal police noticed an SUV traveling without license plates towards the United States border. After pulling over the vehicle, the driver agreed to a physical inspection of the SUV, and that is where officers found “10 sacks, three suitcases, 18 packages made with adhesive tape and 18 plastic containers,” said Gob.MX.

 

“In total, 620 packages and containers were inside the vehicle, with 532 of crystal, 43 of fentanyl, 73 of cocaine and 8 of heroin, which yielded an approximate weight of 508.4 kilograms.,” Gob.Mx adds. The driver was arrested and now faces serious drug charges. Interesting enough, Mexican investigators were able to confirm the vehicle is registered in California.

In December 2017, we noted that drug cartel violence penetrated the tourist areas of Baja California Sur, home to Cabo and La Paz, which is just south to where the 100 pounds of fentanyl was found. In 2017, there were 62 homicides per 100,000 residents in Baja California Sur, as the country suffers from an out of control drug cartel war.

 

Earlier this month,  Mexico was assigned the Level 2 rating, as U.S. citizens and U.S. government employees are urged to “exercise increased caution” and “be aware of heightened risks to safety and security.” Increased violence in the region has been fueled by U.S. demand for opioids coupled with a power struggle between Mexican drug cartels. In the first 11 months of 2017, there were 22,409 deaths across Mexico–making it one of deadliest years ever.

 

It appears the 100 pounds of fentanyl that could have led to millions of overdoses across the United States was en route from the Tijuana cartel controlled area of Baja California.  The vast networks of cartel territories and drug routes are astonishing throughout Mexico.

 

Perhaps it's not supply that's the problem? America has a drug problem and its demand is fueling it.