Zuckerberg Issues Statement On Cambridge Analytica: "We Made Mistakes"

After three days of being inexplicably missing from the public arena at a time when Facebook stock was crashing, the company was being sued, and shareholders were demanding answers, moments ago CEO Mark Zuckerberg finally broke his silence, and published a statement on Facebook, updating on the Cambridge Analytica situation, "including the steps we've already taken and our next steps to address this important issue."

While we repost the full statement below, the following excerpts are key:

We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can't then we don't deserve to serve you. I've been working to understand exactly what happened and how to make sure this doesn't happen again. The good news is that the most important actions to prevent this from happening again today we have already taken years ago. But we also made mistakes, there's more to do, and we need to step up and do it.

Translation: Facebook never did audits of what apps have access to user data to determine if they complied with the TOS. Which is perfectly understandable: after all Facebook is in the "selling user data" business not "protecting user data" business.

And then there was this:

I started Facebook, and at the end of the day I'm responsible for what happens on our platform. I'm serious about doing what it takes to protect our community. While this specific issue involving Cambridge Analytica should no longer happen with new apps today, that doesn't change what happened in the past. We will learn from this experience to secure our platform further and make our community safer for everyone going forward.

So Zuckerberg "takes responsibility"... he just won't change the Class B super-structure that makes him immune to any shareholder ire or, well, responsibility.  He also promises to not share your data... except perhaps with those who only pay Facebook for your data, i.e. advertisers, but unlike Cambridge Analytica promise not to disclose to the world that they have it.

Incidentally, there was one word missing the disingenuous, dissembling 937-word statement, the only word that matters: "advertising."

His full statement is below:

I want to share an update on the Cambridge Analytica situation -- including the steps we've already taken and our next steps to address this important issue.

We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can't then we don't deserve to serve you. I've been working to understand exactly what happened and how to make sure this doesn't happen again. The good news is that the most important actions to prevent this from happening again today we have already taken years ago. But we also made mistakes, there's more to do, and we need to step up and do it.

Here's a timeline of the events:

In 2007, we launched the Facebook Platform with the vision that more apps should be social. Your calendar should be able to show your friends' birthdays, your maps should show where your friends live, and your address book should show their pictures. To do this, we enabled people to log into apps and share who their friends were and some information about them.

In 2013, a Cambridge University researcher named Aleksandr Kogan created a personality quiz app. It was installed by around 300,000 people who shared their data as well as some of their friends' data. Given the way our platform worked at the time this meant Kogan was able to access tens of millions of their friends' data.

In 2014, to prevent abusive apps, we announced that we were changing the entire platform to dramatically limit the data apps could access. Most importantly, apps like Kogan's could no longer ask for data about a person's friends unless their friends had also authorized the app. We also required developers to get approval from us before they could request any sensitive data from people. These actions would prevent any app like Kogan's from being able to access so much data today.

In 2015, we learned from journalists at The Guardian that Kogan had shared data from his app with Cambridge Analytica. It is against our policies for developers to share data without people's consent, so we immediately banned Kogan's app from our platform, and demanded that Kogan and Cambridge Analytica formally certify that they had deleted all improperly acquired data. They provided these certifications.

Last week, we learned from The Guardian, The New York Times and Channel 4 that Cambridge Analytica may not have deleted the data as they had certified. We immediately banned them from using any of our services. Cambridge Analytica claims they have already deleted the data and has agreed to a forensic audit by a firm we hired to confirm this. We're also working with regulators as they investigate what happened.

This was a breach of trust between Kogan, Cambridge Analytica and Facebook. But it was also a breach of trust between Facebook and the people who share their data with us and expect us to protect it. We need to fix that.

In this case, we already took the most important steps a few years ago in 2014 to prevent bad actors from accessing people's information in this way. But there's more we need to do and I'll outline those steps here:

First, we will investigate all apps that had access to large amounts of information before we changed our platform to dramatically reduce data access in 2014, and we will conduct a full audit of any app with suspicious activity. We will ban any developer from our platform that does not agree to a thorough audit. And if we find developers that misused personally identifiable information, we will ban them and tell everyone affected by those apps. That includes people whose data Kogan misused here as well.

Second, we will restrict developers' data access even further to prevent other kinds of abuse. For example, we will remove developers' access to your data if you haven't used their app in 3 months. We will reduce the data you give an app when you sign in -- to only your name, profile photo, and email address. We'll require developers to not only get approval but also sign a contract in order to ask anyone for access to their posts or other private data. And we'll have more changes to share in the next few days.

Third, we want to make sure you understand which apps you've allowed to access your data. In the next month, we will show everyone a tool at the top of your News Feed with the apps you've used and an easy way to revoke those apps' permissions to your data. We already have a tool to do this in your privacy settings, and now we will put this tool at the top of your News Feed to make sure everyone sees it.

Beyond the steps we had already taken in 2014, I believe these are the next steps we must take to continue to secure our platform.

I started Facebook, and at the end of the day I'm responsible for what happens on our platform. I'm serious about doing what it takes to protect our community. While this specific issue involving Cambridge Analytica should no longer happen with new apps today, that doesn't change what happened in the past. We will learn from this experience to secure our platform further and make our community safer for everyone going forward.

I want to thank all of you who continue to believe in our mission and work to build this community together. I know it takes longer to fix all these issues than we'd like, but I promise you we'll work through this and build a better service over the long term.

And here is Sheryl Sandberg, noting that Facebook's troubles are just starting, because as the COO notes, "we're investigating all apps that had access to large amounts of information before we changed our platform in 2014 to dramatically reduce data access." In other words, CA was just the start. The question of course is

Sharing Mark's post addressing the Cambridge Analytica news. As he said, we know that this was a major violation of peoples' trust, and I deeply regret that we didn't do enough to deal with it. We have a responsibility to protect your data - and if we can't, then we don't deserve to serve you.

We've spent the past few days working to get a fuller picture so we can stop this from happening again. Here are the steps we're taking. We're investigating all apps that had access to large amounts of information before we changed our platform in 2014 to dramatically reduce data access. And if we find that developers misused personally identifiable information, we'll ban them from our platform and we'll tell the people who were affected.

We're also taking steps to reduce the data you give an app when you use Facebook login to your name, profile photo, and email address. And we'll make it easier for you to understand which apps you've allowed to access your data.

You deserve to have your information protected - and we'll keep working to make sure you feel safe on Facebook. Your trust is at the core of our service. We know that and we will work to earn it.

You indeed "deserve to have your information protected" and yet it's odd that instead of promising to do that, the best Facebook can come up with is that it will "keep working to make sure you feel safe on Facebook."

Just keep uploading your confidential information please.

Meanwhile after reading those two statements, if anyone has any idea what Facebook admits to having done wrong, please buy the stock. For now, the market's isn't.

Comments

Adolph.H. Stu Elsample Wed, 03/21/2018 - 15:53 Permalink

Is it the same Jew who talks about protecting data blah blah security confidence than the one who once said from his Harvard dorm that dumb fucks entrusted him with their private data? 

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/05/14/facebook_trust_dumb/

Zuck: Yeah so if you ever need info about anyone at Harvard

Zuck: Just ask.

Zuck: I have over 4,000 emails, pictures, addresses, SNS

[Redacted Friend's Name]: What? How'd you manage that one?

Zuck: People just submitted it.

Zuck: I don't know why.

Zuck: They "trust me"

Zuck: Dumb fucks

 

Tick tock motherfucker... MySpace was a fairytale. 

In reply to by Stu Elsample

slopz38 Karl Marxist Wed, 03/21/2018 - 21:35 Permalink

 

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In reply to by Karl Marxist

ZeroSpam slopz38 Wed, 03/21/2018 - 21:56 Permalink

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>>>>   Slopz38 posted this identical spam post   **75 times** in one day, March 20!!!

This chronic thread-hijacker and poster of "My last paycheck..." spam with Multiple Log-on's (aka "stizazz" and "pier" "beepbop"  "Braveforce"  "PRIVETHEDGE"  "SLOPZ38" "LLOLL"  "JUMANJI1959" -- hopefully banned) is a CHRONIC SPAMMER whose "disguised links" (under other log-on's) will take you to his Spam- and Trojan-laden webpages, fondly known by ZHers as "The Whacked Out Biblicism SPAM page" or "BIBLICISM GOES PORNO" where you will be the happy recipient of numerous virus from this very disturbed and obsessed individual, spamming here for more than five years.

ALL THIS SPAM IS FROM THE SAME SPAMMER!
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In reply to by slopz38

Automatic Choke TheDude1224 Wed, 03/21/2018 - 16:57 Permalink

I REALLY REALLY don't understand all the agonizing, the stock selling, and the apologies.

They provide a free service -- whether you use it, hate it, or advertise on it, you still have to agree that they provide a service (social interaction) to anybody who wants it and they don't charge for it.   It is obvious that they are making money by advertising, and anybody who types ANYTHING or posts any pictures of ANYTHING must absolutely assume that all that information is widely sold to anybody with any interest in marketing, polling, and snooping.

Why anybody would act surprised that the user data was taken and used is beyond me.    If anybody was naive enough to assume that Facebook was acting in the users best interest, they only had to look at the corporate profitability to discern otherwise. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjbPi00k_ME

 

In reply to by TheDude1224

NiggaPleeze Automatic Choke Wed, 03/21/2018 - 17:55 Permalink

 

Yes in a way you can blame the dumbfucks who actually think that the ((government)) will protect them or that Mr. Jewberg is ethical.  Idiots, eh?

we don't deserve to serve you

Now isn't that something, he is "serving us" (noting he became one of the so-called "richest men on the planet" with all of his hard service to us).  Well, I suppose, in a way, they do have computer servers that "serve" up pages but what they really are doing is massively invading our privacy and exploiting us.  So if we had a moment of candor from Mr. Jewberg it would go something like this:

we don't deserve to ruthlessly exploit you and treat you like garbage, but because you are stupid enough to let us, you dumb fucks, we will gleefully continue to do spy on you, your friends, co-workers, acquaintances and family!  We will create a Big Brother database of monumental proportions and sell it to whomever we want for whatever we want whenever we want, and when we get caught and our victims are angry, we will write some meaningless tripe about how honored we are to serve you, hahahaha! and you buffoons will fall for it, isn't it wonderful what incorrigible dumb fucks you are!

In reply to by Automatic Choke

mendigo HowdyDoody Wed, 03/21/2018 - 17:44 Permalink

The problem is not that they shared personal data - that is what they do.

Problem is that they did so in effort to influence election.

The thing is they have been openly bias and manipulative.

There should be classification of media which does not demonstrate balance and impartiality. They are a propaganda tool.

It does not benefit the general public.

In reply to by HowdyDoody

Chupacabra-322 Stan522 Wed, 03/21/2018 - 16:36 Permalink

@ Stan,

 

Only citizens can shut down Google, Face Book & other digital monopolies. Every citizen needs to immediately download brave browser or similar adblocking browser.

 

Brave blocks advertising malware and tracking by DEFAULT on any device and operating system rendering digital advertising model useless.

 

It’s so simple that even grandma can use it.

 

Whoever controls the browser controls the money.

 

What is the value of advertising if an ad can't be sent, viewed or tracked?

Also if you are selling my data and I'm the product then why not give me a percentage of the revenue?

 

If you are going to censor, track, steal & sell my data without compensating me, then each day I will try to destroy your business model one person at a time. 

We the citizens can take down the goobook by installing brave.

The FTC won't do anything.

 

Netscape was pre Google. Everything Google does starts with chrome. Brave blocks advertising malware and tracking by DEFAULT rendering digital advertising model useless on any device and operating system.

 

I use Google phone, what good am I to do an advertiser when I can't be served ads, ads can't be viewed and I can't be tracked around internet?

 

I use brave to watch YouTube, no ads. Let Google pick up storage costs. I am not going to let them monetize me if they won't share the profits from selling my data and tracking and censoring me.

In reply to by Stan522

Chupacabra-322 jimmy c korn Wed, 03/21/2018 - 16:39 Permalink

@ Jimmy,

 

Don’t for one second let the Political Ass Munch Theater distract you from what this is really about.  

CONTROL.

 

CONgress will bring him in cry wolf, regulation, Fairness Doctrine all the way to CONTROLLING free speech on the Internet which is why ZuckerFuckFace & CONgress are all “in on it.”

 

They want to impose similar “Hate Crime” (Whatever the Fuck that is) Legislation to mirror that of the Britain & the EU.    

In reply to by jimmy c korn

Endgame Napoleon Chupacabra-322 Wed, 03/21/2018 - 17:31 Permalink

The Fairness Doctrine makes them give equal time to both sides of the political fence, but the hate-speech ban will not cut down on the overall viciousness and bullying in this society.

It will just punish anything that is said critiquing groups in this country who are called minorities, although they are not world-wide minorities in many cases and are not even minorities in the USA when it comes to women—a minority for EEOC purposes.

This leads to unintended consequences, like minorities using the laws opportunistically. Take a minority in a majority-minority workplace, trying to use a crltique of her company’s race-based hiring as a way to undermine a non-minority colleague for speaking out about it, etc. 

In reply to by Chupacabra-322