Michigan State To Pay Gymnastics Sex-Abuse Settlements With $500 Million Bond

Michigan State University's board of trustees approved the issuance bond to finance legal a $500 million legal settlements with hundreds of girls and women sexually assaulted by convicted serial child molester Larry Nassar. Nassar was the doctor for the USA Gymnastics national team and an osteopathic physician at Michigan State. 

Victim Kyle Stephens, Larry Nassar, John Engler

The university will also raise tuition between 2.2 - 2.5% for most in-state students - which will not be used to pay the Nassar settlement. Amid a cash crunch, top administrative and leadership salaries, while raising reducing raises for faculty to 1.5% vs. the typical 2.5%. 

The 50,000-student university is under intense financial pressure following deep budget cuts several years ago - though their net position has improved since 2015 per their most recent annual financial report

At one point during the board meeting, MSU interim President John Engler's job was on the line when trustee Brian Mosallam suddenly changed the agenda to allow for a vote to remove Engler over a disparaging comment he made over email about an accuser and her lawyer.

While the audience cheered the motion, it was defeated 6-2. Engler drew sharp criticism after suggesting that Rachael Denhollander - one of Nassar's most outspoken accusers, must have received a "kickback" from her attorney. some 150 Nassar accusers were demanding Engler's departure before he issued a written apology on Thursday. 

"I didn't give it the consideration it warranted," he wrote. "That was a big mistake. I was wrong. I apologize."

The FBI sat on the Nassar investigation

After FBI offices in three cities were told in July of 2015 that sports doctor Lawrence "Larry" Nassar had been molesting elite gymnasts, the agency advised officials with the US Gymnastics team "not to discuss the case with anyone," before sitting on their hands for over a year - while dozens of girls continued to fall victim to the once-respected Doctor.

Nassar routinely gave his teenage victims highly inappropriate massages under the guise of providing legimiate therapy, with some as young as 12

Jane Doe is an Olympic medalist who claims she was sexually assaulted by Nassar from 1994 to 2000, from when she was 12 or 13 until she was 18. She is also suing USA Gymnastics and three of its past presidents, according to the Indianapolis Star. The lawsuit claims the organization was warned about Nassar and did not adequately address concerns about him.

In the lawsuit she accuses Nassar of “groping and fondling” her “vagina and anus.”

The lawsuit claims Nassar began “grooming” her in 1994 “under the guise of care, athletic training, osteopathy and kinesiology to normalize intimate, inappropriate and sexually abusive contact.”

She accuses Nassar of fondling and groping her “feet, ankles, thighs, buttocks, hips, waist, breast, arms, shoulders and neck” while claiming it was part of the treatment. -Heavy (July, 2016)

In February, the New York Times identified "at least 27 girls and women who say Dr. Nassar molested them between July 2015, when he first fell under F.B.I. scrutiny, and September 2016, when he was exposed by an Indianapolis Star investigation." 

The three alleged victims then at the center of the F.B.I.’s inquiry were world-class athletes; two were Olympic gold medalists. Nearly a year passed before agents interviewed two of the young women.

The silence at times drove the victims and their families to distraction, including Gina Nichols, the mother of the gymnast initially known as “Athlete A”: Maggie Nichols, who was not contacted by the F.B.I. for nearly 11 months after the information she provided sparked the federal inquiry.

I never got a phone call from the police or the F.B.I.” during that time, Gina Nichols, a registered nurse, said. “Not one person. Not one. Not one. Not one.” -NYT

The FBI declined to comment on the investigation, aside from a 112-word statement that said "the safety and well-being of our youth is a top priority for the F.B.I.," while adding that the many allegations against Dr. Nassar "transcended jurisdictions" - an apparent excuse for the agency's lack of action on the case.

Nassar has been sentenced to 40-175 years in Michigan prison - which follows a previous 60-year sentence for child pornography charges. 156 victims testified against him in open court during his sentencing hearing, while he also faces lawsuits from over 100 women who have accused him of sexual abuse. 

How the FBI became involved: 

After the mother of one of Nassar's victims, Gina Nichols, told U.S.A. Gymnastics president Steve Penny about her daughter's molestation - telling him police had to be called immediately, Penny advised her to keep quiet:

Gina Nichols, Maggie’s mother, recalled telling Steve Penny, then the president of U.S.A. Gymnastics, that the police had to be called immediately. But he insisted that she not tell anyone, she said. The organization would take care of alerting law enforcement.

Weeks of silence passed, Gina Nichols said, interrupted occasionally by admonitions from Mr. Penny to keep quiet about the matter — although the United States Olympic Committee has said that U.S.A. Gymnastics reported that one of its physicians had been accused of abusing athletes “and was in the process of contacting the appropriate law enforcement authorities.” -NYT

U.S.A. Gymnastics would eventually hire a specialist in workplace harassment, who recommended that Dr. Nassar be reported to law enforcement following her investigation. 

On Monday, July 17 2015, officials from the US Gymnastics organization contacted the Indianapolis FBI field office. After meeting with agents the next day who assured them they had come to the right place, the gymnastics officials handed the FBI the contact information for three gymnasts: Ms. Nichols, Ms. Raisman, and McKayla Maroney - a retired Olympic gold medalist who had become a minor celebrity. 

Video evidence of Dr. Nassar demonstrating his technique were also handed to agents:

They also turned over copies of videos of Dr. Nassar demonstrating his technique as he chatted clinically about pulled hamstrings, buttocks and trigger points. Reporters for The New York Times have seen the videos, which show him kneading the legs of girls before his ungloved hands begin to work under a towel, between the girls’ legs.

“It’s not a fun place to dig,” Dr. Nassar says to the camera.

“Do the hand-shaky thing,” he adds later, demonstrating how he shakes his hand vigorously when it is deep between a girl’s legs.

Part of the FBI's bungling of the Nassar case may stem from jurisdictional issues; although the agency received the complain in Indianapolis, the alleged sexual abuse by Dr. Nassar had taken place in Texas and Michigan, while one of the victims lived in California. 

When we consulted with the U.S. attorney, we knew right away that we would not have venue,” said Indianapolis FBI agent W. Jay Abbott, who added “It was never really our case.”

Asked why federal law enforcement officials did not notify people — other gymnasts, parents, coaches — that a potential child molester was in their midst, Mr. Abbott said, “That’s where things can get tricky.”

“There is a duty to warn those who might be harmed in the future,” he said. “But everyone is still trying to ascertain whether a crime has been committed. And everybody has rights here” — a reference to both the alleged victims and the person being accused.

An internal debate also took place within the FBI as to whether or not Nassar's techniques were a legitimate medical procedure. 

After not hearing back from the FBI for some time, Mr. Penny and another U.S.A. gymnastics official visited the FBI's Los Angeles bureau. 

“As time passed, concern about a perceived lack of development prompted Board Chair Paul Parilla and C.E.O. Steve Penny to report the matter a second time to a different F.B.I. office,” U.S.A. Gymnastics said in a statement to The Times in February.

So - after two complaints to the FBI over a case that would eventually include three FBI field offices - one of which recommended not saying anything about Nassar - at least 40 victims were molested over the course of the next 14 months.

One father to three of Nassar's victims, Randall Margraves, attempted to attack Nassar in a Michigan courtroom on February 2nd. It took three uniformed deputies and a plain-clothes officer to detain him.

"Let me at that son of a bitch" Margraves shouted in court.

Margraves apologized, telling the court "I feel very remorseful... this cannot be a lawless society, I know that. I lost control but I regained control later in a holding cell," he said.

Comments

Son of Loki FireBrander Mon, 06/25/2018 - 17:33 Permalink

I'm not defending this osteopath, but I will say my masseuse, Mistress Thai Wong, has proven to me that a "Happy Ending" is a quick and effective treatment for certain ailments like a headache, sore back, etc. The "Happy Ending" treatment method also seemed to help my knee when I sprained it.

The football players this guy treated don't seem to be complaining.

I'm just saying ....

In reply to by FireBrander

Jeffersonian Liberal DownWithYogaPants Mon, 06/25/2018 - 18:56 Permalink

Great. So, once again, the law-abiding citizen has to pay the bill for some scumbags criminal action.

Here's an idea:

In addition to taking the money from the university and the pensions of the teachers and barring them from raising rates to pay for this, put this scumbag on life-support and sell his organs one excruciating operation at a time. Do not use anesthesia. Do not let him die. Let him watch himself being dissected alive and sold.

In reply to by DownWithYogaPants

claytonmoore50 DownWithYogaPants Mon, 06/25/2018 - 20:43 Permalink

"After FBI offices in three cities were told in July of 2015 that sports doctor Lawrence "Larry" Nassar had been molesting elite gymnasts, the agency advised officials with the US Gymnastics team "not to discuss the case with anyone," before sitting on their hands for over a year - while dozens of girls continued to fall victim to the once-respected Doctor."

 

How far the FBI has fallen...

In reply to by DownWithYogaPants

shemite Posa Mon, 06/25/2018 - 21:28 Permalink

The real story goes much deeper. All these high level gymnasts are victims of MKULTRA mind programming. The abuse is part of the programming and their parents prostitute them into the system..The parents are usually witches themselves. 

They outed this doctor now only as part of their "me too" program to demonize men. This is abuse still going on throughout the sports, entertainment and political world.

In reply to by Posa

Son of Loki Skateboarder Mon, 06/25/2018 - 17:37 Permalink

I agree. Two lawyers I talked to in passing said they are surprised the prosecutor did not file some sort of conspiracy charges against the administrators. However, I agree with those on board who would argue the father's might seek a special justice given the horrendous behavior of this guy. I know if someone did this to my sister, there would be no need to involve the police.

In reply to by Skateboarder

land_of_the_few Skateboarder Mon, 06/25/2018 - 19:39 Permalink

Well it seems they were trying to keep it swept under the carpet, while they were busy trying to run with McLaren's "antidoping" psyops with his Russian BFF Rodchenkov - who seemed to use unusual English phrases as if the story script had been written for an English speaking audience by some kind of retarded-thinking native English speaker? Wouldn't want to queer his pitch with stories of abused US athletes ...

In reply to by Skateboarder

Omen IV E.F. Mutton Mon, 06/25/2018 - 17:16 Permalink

ONE Employee= $500 million liability

assuming 100 victims it would be $5mm each

so given the Exposure why would you have “any” Employees for the citizens to pay for?

they are dismantling the entire civilized system over centuries constructed for public education and all government services - the real estate taxes will bury your asset and the income tax will bury your cash flow paying for this 

 

its over!

In reply to by E.F. Mutton

Kickaha claytonmoore50 Mon, 06/25/2018 - 21:43 Permalink

Correct, as to pain and suffering, as opposed to lost income, which is commonly a component of a personal injury Judgment when the injured person was prevented from working by the injury.  It is doubtful these minor girls could legitimately claim lost income, but maybe that might be a tactic on the part of some of them to increase their own share of the $500 M pie.  They won't just split this evenly among the 100 victims.  There will be some sort of damages hearing.

In reply to by claytonmoore50

LadyAtZero E.F. Mutton Mon, 06/25/2018 - 19:03 Permalink

The crazy thing is that monetary compensation isn't even what these families are probably looking for.  

(The money is nice, but --- )

What they are looking for is accountability.   

For every FBI employee who ignored their calls..........for every university employee who ignored them...for every police department employee who ignored them.... and for every gymnastics official who ignored them....

Every one of these people should lose their jobs for at least a few years, and be subject to public shame.

 

 

In reply to by E.F. Mutton

847328_3527 Never One Roach Mon, 06/25/2018 - 16:58 Permalink

His methods were ... "unconventional."

Weinstein says, "Nasser was very creative..."

According to his victims, Nassar's attention wasn't on their hamstrings or ACLs; instead, he focused on their anuses, breasts and vaginas. In January 2017, one victim spelled it out in her complaint: "Nassar digitally penetrated Plaintiff Jane A. Doe's vagina multiple times without prior notice and without gloves or lubricant." Other victims describe Nassar's forcing his "dry fingers" into their anuses and vaginas. The violent fisting was excruciating. "I'd want to scream," said Kassie Powell, an MSU pole vaulter. As Amy Labadie, a gymnast, put it: "My vagina was sore during my competition because of this man."

 

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-heffernan-larry-nassar-20180…

In reply to by Never One Roach

HRH of Aquitaine 2.0 847328_3527 Mon, 06/25/2018 - 17:32 Permalink

Did you read this?

"Video evidence of Dr. Nassar demonstrating his technique were also handed to agents:

"They also turned over copies of videos of Dr. Nassar demonstrating his technique as he chatted clinically about pulled hamstrings, buttocks and trigger points. Reporters for The New York Times have seen the videos, which show him kneading the legs of girls before his ungloved hands begin to work under a towel, between the girls’ legs.

“It’s not a fun place to dig,” Dr. Nassar says to the camera.

“Do the hand-shaky thing,” he adds later, demonstrating how he shakes his hand vigorously when it is deep between a girl’s legs."

FFS you can't make this shit up. What was this? Mass delusion and people willing to listen and submit to someone in authority? Doctors are powerful.

I had an incident when I was in the hospital two years ago. It was during the diagnostic phase and I was in the observation unit which was one step down from ICU. Some of the shit they did, under the guise of diagnosis, was embarrassing and inappropriate given the information I provided at the time. What would I say now? "No" and "get the fuck out of my room." Doctors are used to people following their orders. They lose empathy and end up looking at people as slabs of meat.

In reply to by 847328_3527

Pure Evil Posa Mon, 06/25/2018 - 22:24 Permalink

I'm sure you've heard how love is blind making someone overlook someone else's faults which are obvious to others.

Greed and ambition is even more powerful.

Here you have parents more than willing to overlook their daughters being molested in the vain hope that their child will succeed at becoming a national champion.

And, now we know why Weinstein got away with what he did for so long. An endless parade of young women hoping to become rich and famous celebrities with many more than willing to do what it takes to get there.

As the old say goes, the end justifies the means. Even if that means having any form of sex with Harvey.

We've all heard the stories and seen the whores chasing after the sports jocks or music celebrities. Just cause a white whore dating the football team's star black athlete gets grabbed by the hair and drug down a flight of stairs doesn't mean he should be barred from playing in a National Championship game. Right Tom Osborne?

Or, allegations of a star quarterback raping a young women shouldn't keep him from winning a National Championship and then moving on to the NFL.

Or, having a serial killer Play for the Patriots while overlooking his obvious gang tattoos.

In reply to by Posa

FireBrander cankles' server Mon, 06/25/2018 - 17:13 Permalink

Nassar was "known" to the FBI; which is code for "people in high places protected Nassar...he was put above the law"...see Hillary's email scandal for another, gross, example of "one law for them, and another for you"...

Meanwhile, locally, a mom fell asleep, her 2 year old walked out the door in his diapers...she's in jail and the child is with DHS...separated from his mom...why not put the kid in jail too?

In reply to by cankles' server

Hal n back ejmoosa Mon, 06/25/2018 - 17:07 Permalink

who pays--the taxpayer or the students. or both.

These are administrators and educators  who are already highly compensated with great retirement benefits the private sector does not get. Many full prof do not even teach. They screwed this up royally.

Some were merely fired: they were lucky with that. They had a fiduciary responsibility, They screwed up royally.

Mom and Dad did not  tell me to be an educator 55 years ago-they should have-less stress, fewer hours, more money. I probably wourl not have fit in. I was too passionate about finance.

Sorry educators--since most of you were not in the public sector and have tenure-you have no clue about real life.

 

In reply to by ejmoosa