"We Fear For Our Lives": First 50 White South African Families Start Resettlement In Russia

Just weeks after we reported that white South African farmers, facing racial genocide, had begun seeking refuge - from the violent attacks and death threats of their own government's policies - in friendly foreign nations such as Australia, RT reports  the first 50 families of Boers, descendants of Dutch settlers in South Africa, could soon be moving to Russia to escape rising violence against farmers.

As a reminder, back in February, after literally years of scandal, abuse, and incompetence, South Africa’s president Jacob Zuma was finally forced to resign last week, and new President, Cyril Ramaphosa, was supposed to represent a positive, new chapter for South Africa.

However, as Simon Black wrote at the time, Ramaphosa addressed the nation’s parliament in Cape Town and made clear that his priority is to heal the divisions and injustice of the past, going all the way back to the original European colonists in the 1600s taking land from the indigenous tribes.

Ramaphosa called this “original sin”, and stated that he wants to see “the return of the land to the people from whom it was taken… to heal the divisions of the past.”

How does he plan on doing that?

Confiscation. Specifically– confiscation without compensation.

The expropriation of land without compensation is envisaged as one of the measures that we will use to accelerate redistribution of land to black South Africans.

Ramaphosa minced no words: he’s talking about taking land from white farmers and giving it to black South Africans.

And since then the violence and death threats have only worsened forcing many to want to leave South Africa and become farmers in Russia.

And as RT reports, earlier this month, farmer Adi Schlebusch visited Russia’s farmbelt Stavropol Region.

Schlebusch, whose grandfather was murdered at his farm, told RT that the land in South Africa “was never taken by whites from blacks with violence or in an unjust manner.”

He explained that when Boers moved to South Africa in the 19th century, they tried to act in a way that was fair, to negotiate officially and to avoid conflict, but Ramaphosa's new government refuses to negotiate.

Rights groups said the initiative incites violence - there were 74 farm murders and 638 attacks, primarily against white farmers, in 2016-17 in South Africa - and while the government doesn't dispute the figures, officials say farmers are victims of crime like just other citizens of the country gripped by violence and that they are not targeted because they are white.

Schlebusch confirmed to RT that roughly 15,000 Boers are ready to leave their country and begin a new life in Russia.

The reason I’m considering immigration is honestly because I see dark clouds hanging over our future. The reality is that we do fear for our lives. And the reality is that a white farmer is attacked every day in South Africa. My grandfather was murdered on this farm. The government is certainly responsible for creating that climate of antagonism towards white farmers.”

The farmer said he visited Russia with his family to explore the possibilities of resettling in the area. “I know the growth of agricultural production is immense in Russia. So, I think it’s the right time to buy in into agriculture in Russia. And I think there’s a lot of potential.”

Stavropol is ready to settle up to 50 Boer families, according to the region’s Deputy Commissioner for human rights Vladimir Poluboyarenko. A Russian delegation is due to come to South Africa to work out a more detailed resettlement plan with the Boer community.