White House Coordinating Second Trump-Kim Meeting After North Korean Leader Sends "Very Positive Letter" 

The White House is coordinating a second meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, after the North Korean leader sent a "very warm, very positive letter" requesting a follow-up summit to their earlier sit-down in Singapore on June 12. 

"The primary purpose of the letter was to request, and look to schedule another meeting with the president," said White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders during Monday's press briefing, adding that it was a request "which we are open to and already in the process of coordinating."

"The recent parade in North Korea, for once, was not about their nuclear arsenal," Sanders said, pointing to the letter as "further evidence of progress" between Washington and Pyongyang over denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

On Sunday, North Korea celebrated the 70th anniversary of its founding with a massive military parade - which conspicuously did not include long-range ballistic missiles. 

The North’s intercontinental ballistic missiles, including its Hwasong-14 and Hwasong-15, have been a main feature of its recent military parades, including one in February, and they have provoked President Trump to the extent that he has threatened military action. Their absence in Sunday’s parade is an encouraging signal for Washington, which has been urging the North’s leader, Kim Jong-un, to ease tensions and focus on diplomacy aimed at ending his country’s nuclear weapons program. -New York Times

Meanwhile, satellite imagery from the last several months analyzed by 38 North has revealed progressive dismantling of key facilities related to their nuclear program. 

new commercial satellite imagery of the Sohae Satellite Launching Station (North Korea’s main satellite launch facility since 2012) indicates that the North has begun dismantling key facilities. Most notably, these include the rail-mounted processing building—where space launch vehicles are assembled before moving them to the launch pad—and the nearby rocket engine test stand used to develop liquid-fuel engines for ballistic missiles and space launch vehicles. -38 North

These facilities are believed to have played a substantial role in North Korea's intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) program. Photos taken between July 20 and July 22 reveal the deconstruction, including the facility's rail-mounted transfer structure and other features. 

Commercial satellite imagery of the launch pad from July 20 shows that the rail-mounted processing/transfer structure has been moved to the middle of the pad, exposing the underground rail transfer point—one of the few times it has been seen in this location. The roof and supporting structure have been partially removed and numerous vehicles are present—including a large construction crane. An image from two days later shows the continued presence of the crane and vehicles. Considerable progress has been made in dismantling the rail-mounted processing/transfer structure. One corner has been completely dismantled and the parts can be seen lying on the ground. In both images the two fuel/oxidizer bunkers, main processing building and gantry tower remain untouched. -38 North