"Women For Kavanaugh" March On Washington In Support Of Supreme Court Nominee

As liberal groups plan mass "pussy hat" protests in the event of Judge Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the US Supreme Court, a group of women has come out in support of the nominee. 

"Women for Kavanaugh" appeared on Capitol Hill during last week's Senate testimony by Kavanaugh and a woman accusing him of sexual assault at a high school party 30 years ago - one of several women to crop up right before his confirmation, sending the proceedings into disarray. 

To Hannah King, a college senior from Bristol, Tennessee, Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations of a drunken attack by Kavanaugh at a 1982 party when both were in high school were jarring and scary. But while King expressed empathy for Ford, she also said she’s concerned about the timing of Ford’s allegations, which surfaced publicly only after Kavanaugh — already a federal judge — was nominated to the Supreme Court. -AP

"It was too timely and strategic," said King, 21. "Anything like that makes you question how true it is." 

"someone’s promotion isn’t something that should prompt someone to come forward." 

The group has even made an advertisement conveying their cause: 

43-year-old Tammy Ring told the Daily Beast that she had been both sexually harassed and assaulted, and that she supports Kavanaugh despite believing that Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford believes her account. 

“I thought she seemed credible,” said Tammy Ring, a 43-year-old Kavanaugh supporter from Cocoa, Florida, who told The Daily Beast she had been both sexually harassed and assaulted. “I don't know that I believe that Judge Kavanaugh assaulted her, but I think that she believes that he did. She didn’t come across as somebody that was making this up or coming forward with a lie.” -Daily Beast

Other women backing Kavanaugh have noted that old memories over a lifetime of experiences can become muddied, and some people must question the power of their own recollections. 

"I remember things that happened to me as a child that I talked to my sisters about, and they remembered it totally different than I did," said Maryland resident Debby Leach, 65, who says she was sexually abused as a child. "How I remember it versus how they remember it are two entirely different things. So I think that after a number of years go by, you believe a certain thing. You convince yourself of a certain thing."

Others have suggested Ford's recollection could be a case of mistaken identity - a theory floated by GOP attorney and former Scalia clerk, Ed Whelan, who posted a lengthy theory over Twitter that Kavanaugh's high school doppelganger may in fact be responsible for Ford's memory. Whelan has since deleted the thread. 

"It feels mistaken identity to me," said Sonia Souza, a San Diego resident who said she experienced in her past something "slightly less serious" than the attack Ford described. "I haven’t seen these pictures, but I hear there are a couple people who look like [Kavanaugh]… It’s definitely open to misidentification." 

Souza was also struck by a specific detail in Ford’s account: that six or eight weeks later, she had spotted the man who allegedly helped Kavanaugh attack her—and she waved at him.

“I was like, “What? Why would you say hi to him?’” Souza said, citing her own experience as a survivor of sexual misconduct. -Daily Beast

"There’s definitely a tactic here to just delay because they don’t like [Kavanaugh], or because of whatever they think is going to vote on Roe v Wade," Souza said, referring to the landmark Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion nationwide. "There’s some left side that is definitely pushing this."