Gun Bill To Require Buyers To Hand Over Social Media Passwords & Search History

Submitted by Joseph Jankowski of Planet Free Will

The bill, drafted by state Senator Kevin Parker and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, would give state officials the ability to review up to three years worth of internet search history, reports WKBW Buffalo.

Providing more information on the newly-drafted bill, Rochester First is reporting that the search history will come from major search engines such as Google, Yahoo, and Bing.

Also, anyone applying for, or renewing a pistol permit would have to give up all login information, including passwords, for any social media sites they’re a part of.

Posts from the past three years on sites like Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat would be reviewed for language containing slurs, racial/gender bias, threats and terrorism.

“There should be more restrictions on how guns are purchased. We should have more background checks,” Paul McQuillen, director of the Buffalo chapter of New Yorkers Against Gun Violence, told WKBW.

“We’ve obviously seen some of the mass shooters have a social media history that should have sent red flags,” McQuillen added.

James Tresmond, a gun rights lawyer, told the local NY station that the bill would violate multiple constitutional rights.

“The first, the second amendment, the fifth amendment, the fourth amendment, and the 14th amendment,” Tresmond said.

Some are arguing that the subjective nature of the bill is highly concerning.

“The judge who grants or denies a permit has fairly broad digression under New York State law.  And it has to have a rational basis. So they can’t say they don’t like your gender or your race,” Sheldon Boyce, an attorney with Brenna Boyce PLLC, told WIVB 4.

“For example, religious practice- are we going to deny permits because a person goes to church or goes to a mosque?” Boyce asked. “In the case of Heller vs District of Columbia in 2008, the US Supreme Court held that the possession of a hand gun in the home is a fundamental constitutional right so anything that infringes upon that right is subject to challenge,” he explained

The bill is currently in committee with a scheduled vote still pending.