Map: Where Young Adults Live With Their Parents

Submitted by Visual Capitalist

For a variety of different reasons, there is a growing proportion of young adults that are living with their parents in the United States.

As of 2017, it’s estimated that 34.5% of young adults (18-34 years old) in the U.S live at home – one of the highest percentages in recent memory. How does this national average compare to individual states, and how does data break down further by age and gender over time?

Living at Home

Today’s interactive map comes to us from Overflow Data, and visualizes data at the state level, showing a wide range from 16% (D.C., North Dakota) to closer to 47% (New Jersey).

Here are the five states with the highest proportion of young adults living at home:

New Jersey is the surprising leader here, with 47.3% of young adults between 18-34 years living at home. This is at least partially a result of the state’s proximity to big cities like New York City and Philadelphia, in which young adults choose to commute instead of renting or buying places in those cities themselves.

With higher housing costs and rents, it’s also not surprising to see other states with large populations like California, Florida, and New York as being well represented at the top of the list.

Differences by Age

While figures are going up across the board, a particular subsegment (25-34 years old) stands out as rising to its highest point in at least 30 years.

Both men and women in this older millennial segment are starting to become more likely to stay at home:

There are many potential culprits for this trend, including social and economic factors.

It’s well-documented that millennials are marrying later, which is a traditional impetus for moving away from home. Today’s young adults are also putting off having kids until later in adulthood.

At the same time, on the economic front, higher housing prices and mounting student debt are two factors that are preventing young adults from having the necessary resources to move out as early as they might like.

What do you think is the major cause behind this trend, and do you think it will reverse?