New York County Bans Measles-Infected People From Public-Places For 3 Weeks

Less than three weeks after an unsuccessful attempt to prevent unvaccinated children from public places, Rockland County, New York officials have announced they want to ban people infected with measles from public places for up to 21 days.

CBS News reports that there have been 33 additional cases (555 in total across the nation) since a judge threw out Rockland County's initial emergency order,  leading officials to take these new extreme measures.

After the initial ban was thrown out, Mayor Bill De Blasio declared a public health emergency mandating that any unvaccinated children living in certain ZIP codes must receive the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine or their family could face heavy penalties.

While Rockland County officials said they aren't going to go around arresting people with measles, they insist it's about keeping the public safe. 

"Failure to comply will result in $2,000 per violation per day," said Rockland County Commissioner of Health Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert. 

New York's measles outbreak has now spread to more than 20 states.

"Measles is a huge public health issue because it is so contagious," said Dr. Alanna Levine. 

In March, a New York man, unaware he was infected, drove to Michigan and ended up infecting 38 other people.

"My colleagues across the country are all worried that the measles are gonna hit their community," Levine said.

"So as a country, we need to make sure that everybody gets vaccinated."